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Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: Christopher on July 25, 2008, 04:43:09 PM

Title: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on July 25, 2008, 04:43:09 PM
I did a search and couldn't find a Hitchcock thread. I know we've had one before, but I guess that could have been on the old board. Anyhow, we should have a general Hitchcock thread. He was sorta good at what he did. ;) And I did notice that there's a decent number of Hitchcock titles in our survivor game.

I've recently watched The Lady Vanishes and Young and Innocent, and I was very impressed with both. I'd seen The Lady Vanishes a long time ago, but liked it much more this time around. I've realized there's a number of his British films I haven't seen, so I need to get to those. I've seen a few others but not a lot. I haven't seen any of his silent films, and I'd think The Lodger would probably be a must.

So what are everybody's favorite Hitchcock titles? Least favorite?

Usually if I'm going to name off a few favorite titles, I'll say Vertigo, Psycho, Strangers on a Train, Shadow of a Doubt, and Frenzy. Vertigo is my favorite, but the others are just randomly listed.

Of all his films I've seen, I think Topaz is my least favorite. I should probably watch it again, actually. I couldn't really seem to get into it.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: WeAllHaveItCominKid on July 25, 2008, 06:06:03 PM

I'm a big Hitchcock fan here so I always welcome a thread dedicated to arguably the best suspense director ever.

My personal favorite Hitchcock film is "The Birds." I just think it's absolutely brilliant that a man can direct a film without a musical score and still make it tention and suspense filled. It's a think of genius if you ask me.

I own most of the Hitchcock library. I have many, many favorites.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Gant on July 28, 2008, 04:45:55 AM
Lets have a Hitchcock top 5

I'll go with

Vertigo

North By Northwest

The Birds

Rebecca

Rear Window
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Alcatraz on July 28, 2008, 09:21:01 AM
A top 5. . . . lesse:

1. Psycho

2. Rear Window

3. Rebecca

4. North by Northwest

5. Vertigo


Psycho introduced me to black and white films and I loved it, so its def my #1 Hitchcock film.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Ellen on July 28, 2008, 06:15:09 PM
These are sort of in order. From what I have, my favorites are . . .

Rebecca (1940)
Rear Window (1954)
Psycho (1960)
Dial M for Murder (1954)
The Birds (1963)
Notorious (1946)
North by Northwest (1959)
Strangers on a Train (1951)
Vertigo (1958)   
Spellbound (1945) 
The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934)

The only one I have that I don't care for is The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956).

I still want to see this one. The Trouble with Harry (1955)

Here are some that he directed, that are totally legal to view. Their copyrights are now public domain.

The 39 Steps (1935) (http://www.archive.org/details/The39Steps)
Shadow of a Doubt (1943) (http://www.archive.org/details/shadowofadoubt1943hitchcock)
The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934) (http://www.archive.org/details/AHTheManWhoKnewTooMuch1934)
The Lady Vanishes (1938) (http://www.archive.org/details/lady_vanishes)
Stage Fright (1950) (http://www.archive.org/details/Hitchcock_Stage_Fright)
Young and Innocent (The Girl Was Young) (1937) (http://www.archive.org/details/YoungandInnocentTheGirlWasYoung)

I've not seen all of these, so I'm not saying they're all worth watching. To each their own, anyway!
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on July 29, 2008, 04:01:53 AM
I'm willing to bet those films you listed are not in the public domain, except maybe the 30's movies, but I doubt those are either.  They're all worth watching, though I have not seen the last one you listed.

Anyway, Shadow of a Doubt is probably my favorite Hitchcock film, followed by Rear Window and North By Northwest.

Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Ellen on July 29, 2008, 08:29:04 AM
I truly believe they are. Here is their about (http://www.archive.org/about/about.php) page.


I wouldn't dare to post them, if I thought otherwise.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on July 29, 2008, 04:22:45 PM
Psycho introduced me to black and white films and I loved it, so its def my #1 Hitchcock film.
Psycho was my favorite Hitchcock film for a while. It was the first of his I saw, waaay back when I was around 10 or so. I didn't know anything about the movie before watching it, which is, of course, ideal. I remember it just came on TV, whatever channel I had it on, and I sat and watched it.

And of course I remember Nick@Nite showing Alfred Hitchcock Presents, which is one of my all time favorite TV shows. I'm a sucker for anthology shows anyhow, and Presents and Twilight Zone have always been my favorites.

Getting back to my favorite movies, I realized Vertigo was my favorite a few years ago when I was taking a film appreciation class in college (that's been nearly five years ago...now :o). We watched a couple Hitchcock movies in class, and then we had to view Vertigo outside class and write a paper about it. I watched it about three times for that paper, and realized I absolutely loved the movie. It struck such a strong chord with me. It's a movie I've always liked, but it grew into my favorite. The first time I saw it, it was shortly before Jimmy Stewart died, unfortunately. I remember watching this and The Man Who Knew Too Much, and it seemed within weeks later, Stewart had died. Stewart is my favorite of the "old-time" actors, and I think his greatest performance is in Vertigo.

Just to continue this rambling post of mine... ;)

Of my favorites I've listed, I'd say Frenzy might be the most surprising to include. The first time I watched it, probably back sometime as a teenager, I really didn't know what to think about it. It was quite graphic, and laced with this very dark humor. I just thought it was an okay movie. But with multiple viewings, I've liked it more and more. It's so macabre and funny--it's classic Hitchcock!
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on July 30, 2008, 03:52:14 AM
I truly believe they are. Here is their about (http://www.archive.org/about/about.php) page.


I wouldn't dare to post them, if I thought otherwise.

I wasn't trying to give you a hard time, Ellen, I would just find it shocking that the copyrights for those movies weren't renewed, but anything's possible.  Regardless, the restored version of all of Hitch's movies would have a new copyright, and therefore would not be in the public domain even if the original version is, just in case there's any confusion. 

You mentioned The Trouble with Harry.  I really like that movie.  I watched it on TCM actually just a couple of weeks ago.  Shirley MacLaine is quite charming and Edmund Gwenn is great as the Captain.  It's a very low-key movie considering the outrageousness of the plot, and I remember when I first saw it being a little uncertain for the first twenty minutes or so, but then the movie's charm grew on me.  In another director's hands, the movie might have tried for bigger laughs and perhaps more slapstick, but I enjoy the low-key approach to what is actually quite macabre humor.


Of my favorites I've listed, I'd say Frenzy might be the most surprising to include. The first time I watched it, probably back sometime as a teenager, I really didn't know what to think about it. It was quite graphic, and laced with this very dark humor. I just thought it was an okay movie. But with multiple viewings, I've liked it more and more. It's so macabre and funny--it's classic Hitchcock!

Also one of my favorites.  Hitchcock got away from the glamorous, Hollywood style film of murder and suspense and went back to England to film what is without question his grittiest movie, and is also his most modern film.  There are many of the Hitchcock touches, but it's definitely a different style.  It very likely points to the new direction he might have taken had he stayed healthy and creative for another ten years.  And like you said, the humor is great.  Nobody combined humor and the macabre as deftly as did Hitchcock.  It's one of the many things I love about Shadow of a Doubt.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on November 23, 2008, 06:03:06 PM
So nobody else has anything to say about Hitchcock? 

Anyway, some of Hitch's films are among the most watched movies in my life, but there's still a few I haven't seen (or have only seen once) and for that I cannot explain why.  So I finally saw Stage Fright the other night.  Here's a few thoughts.  (Ahem, there are SPOILERS here.)

First of all, it features some truly great performances, especially by the female leads Jane Wyman and Marlene Dietrich.  You cannot accuse the film of not being well acted.

In this noir-ish suspense thriller we the audience are told through a “false flashback” that Charlotte Inwood (Marlene Dietrich), a famous stage actress, killed her husband and that Jonathan Cooper (Richard Todd) helped her dispose of her bloodstained dress.  By the end we find out that Cooper was in fact the murderer and that Charlotte witnessed it.  Sort of a lame twist, if you ask me.  Either way they’re both guilty, and there’s not even any twist in motivation -- in fact, there’s no real exploration of motivation given at all, except we are to assume she felt nothing for her husband and was able to convince Cooper to kill him.  Of course, it’s all just an excuse to put our heroine Eve Gill (Jane Wyman), an aspiring actress herself, who one time had a crush on Cooper, into various suspenseful situations as she tries to pin the murder on Charlotte, even going so far as to assume a fake name and act as Charlotte’s dresser.  And the suspense at times is first rate, as only Hitch could do suspense, and in it all are some wonderfully humorous scenes.  Hitchcock, after all, was the master of combining suspense, murder, and humor.

Still, it’s a rather average Hitchcock film, and one he personally did not care for, as he felt the “false flashback” didn’t work.  I think he was onto a good idea there, but like I said, the final twist just doesn’t pay off.  Although at the point we learn for sure he’s the murderer, and in fact had gotten away with murder once before due to a self-defense plea, we see a truly scary transformation as he’s hiding backstage with Eve, and begins to come to the conclusion that if he commits murder a third time, this time with no motive at all, that perhaps he can escape with an insanity plea.  The use of lighting in this scene and in several others is worth noting.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Hemlock on November 23, 2008, 06:40:49 PM
My all time favourite Hitchcock film is North By Northwest also it`s the only Hitchcock film that I own on DVD  :o
I like Psycho,The Birds,Vertigo,The Rope,Notorius and ofcourse Rear Window.
One of his  not so well received film was Marnie with Sean Connery and Tippi Hedren.It is quite good if not going to make my top five list.
Actually I can think only two films from Hitchcock that didn`t work for me and those were Topaz and Torn Curtain even though the latter had Paul Newman in it.
Also there`s still number of Hitchcock films that I´ve not seen yet like The Paradine Case,Family Plot,Stage Fright and just about anything that he did before The 39 Steps.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Walt on November 24, 2008, 05:39:38 AM
My top 5 Hitchcock.

1. Vertigo

2. Rear Window

3. Psycho

4. Rope

5. Frenzy
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on November 24, 2008, 05:46:46 AM
 :)  I watched yesterday night " Mary " (1931)  It was very interesting ,  because OV was in German !   :o
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on November 24, 2008, 06:42:50 AM
:)  I watched yesterday night " Mary " (1931)  It was very interesting ,  because OV was in German !   :o

That's not surprising ... Mary was the German version of the film released in English as Murder. According to a commentator on the IMDb, it was ...

Quote
filmed at the same time on the same sets [as Murder] but with a mostly different cast, [and] is 28 minutes shorter than the English version! It leaves out all of the touches that make the English version enjoyable, and also leaves out some of the clues that lead to the murderer.

http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0021128/#comment

It wasn't uncommon in the early days of "talkies" for different versions of movies to be filmed in different languages; the modern practice of dubbing hadn't been developed yet.

Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Chris66 on November 24, 2008, 09:30:45 AM
My favourites would be Rear Window and The Birds.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: WeAllHaveItCominKid on November 24, 2008, 03:04:08 PM

I'm watching "Rebecca" right now. I just love this film. It's amazing that this is the only Hitchcock film that won BEST PICTURE out of all his great work.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Gant on November 25, 2008, 03:41:39 AM
I read today that John Michael Hayes passed away a few days ago..

Hayes was a screen writer who collaborated with Hitchcock on four films..

To Catch A Thief, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and most notably Rear Window.

Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on November 25, 2008, 06:23:30 AM
I read today that John Michael Hayes passed away a few days ago..

Hayes was a screen writer who collaborated with Hitchcock on four films..

To Catch A Thief, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and most notably Rear Window.

R.I.P.

Here's a link to his obit in the New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/25/movies/25hayes.html

Quote
In interviews over the years, Mr. Hayes was forthright about what it was like to write for Mr. Hitchcock. “I enjoyed working with him professionally, but off the screen he wasn’t so likable,” he told The Worcester Telegram & Gazette in 1999. “He was egotistical to the point of madness.”
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on November 25, 2008, 01:48:52 PM
   :(   R.I.P.  Mr. Hayes .


    I watched last night " Rope" ( 1948 ) .   I love this one very much .  This film is very simple but I think that there are many interesting things .
 
        Before, Jimmy's performance is very nice as always .   Camera work ; like a long one take shot is beautiful . The plot of this film is very interesting too.
        A story make feeling about homosexual is rare in those days .   I felt everything very fresh !
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: JMG on March 24, 2009, 11:14:18 AM
Here's my top ten list of favorite Hitchcock movies. It's difficult to put them in any kind of an order because they're all so good. It goes something like this...

Vertigo (1958)
Shadow of a Doubt (1943)
Psycho (1960)
North by Northwest (1959)
Rear Window (1954)
Lifeboat (1944)
The Birds (1963)
Strangers on a Train (1951)
Notorious (1946)
Dial M for Murder (1954)

There are several more that I haven't seen in a while and want to pick up on DVD.

Honorable mention needs to go to 'Alfred Hitchcock Presents' and 'The Alfred Hitchcock Hour', TV anthology series' I watched as a youngster that got me interested in Hitchcock in the first place.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on May 04, 2010, 04:17:00 AM
 
 On the occasion of 30th death anniversary of Hitchcock, there are on parade of his movies on TV.
 
 " Rear Window" (1954 )   I like this couple in this movie, especially Grace Kelly was sublime!   8)

 " FRENZY " ( 1972)

 " The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1934 ) Original version for a first time. I prefer the second ( 1956 ) with Doris and Jimmy!  :D

 
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on August 29, 2010, 06:51:37 PM
 
 " Dial M for Murder "  1954 With Ray Milland, Grace Kelly.
 
 One of best film in the mystery genre.   Grace Kelly is beautiful and sublime as usual.   :)
 
 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/48/Dial_M_For_Murder.jpg)
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dial_M_For_Murder.jpg

 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9a/Dial_M.jpg)
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dial_M.jpg
 
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: gwb, pt deux on September 02, 2010, 08:44:46 AM
 
 " Dial M for Murder "  1954 With Ray Milland, Grace Kelly.
 
 One of best film in the mystery genre.   Grace Kelly is beautiful and sublime as usual.   :)
 
 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/48/Dial_M_For_Murder.jpg)
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dial_M_For_Murder.jpg

 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9a/Dial_M.jpg)
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dial_M.jpg
 


I saw that film in 3D!  Perfect use for it, too, especially back in the day....  Hitch used 3D to great effect, at the end.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on January 24, 2011, 07:06:10 PM
I watched tonight " Marnie " 1964 with  Tippi Hedren, Sean Connery........Bruce Dern and Melody Thomas Scott... 
Tippi is very different in this movie than in "The Birds".

  (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/ac/Marnie1.jpg/395px-Marnie1.jpg)

   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marnie_%28film%29
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on January 24, 2011, 09:31:20 PM
And Sean Connery is very different than in the James Bond movies! ;)
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Aline on January 28, 2011, 07:41:19 AM
I watched this one again last night.

(http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh205/raissa_2008/filmepactosinistro.jpg)
(Strangers on a Train)

Everytime is like the first one...love Robert Walker in it.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on March 27, 2011, 06:44:37 PM

 " Torn Curtain "   1966 With Paul Newman and Julie Andrews.

 For espionage like this, I prefer "The Man Who Knew Too Much" 1956 with Doris and Jimmy.

  (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6e/Torn_curtain.jpg)
 
   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Torn_curtain.jpg
 
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: The Schofield Kid on April 01, 2011, 11:31:52 PM
Today's quote on my desktop calendar is from the man himself.

Quote
Drama is life with the dull bits cut out.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on April 02, 2011, 08:34:06 AM
I like that ... though sometimes I think it's the other way round. ;)
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Phantomstranger on April 05, 2011, 10:06:47 PM
Lets see:

1) Psycho (greatest thriller ever made)
2) North By Northwest
3) The Birds
4) Rear Window
5)Dial M For Murder
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Lin Sunderland on April 06, 2011, 01:37:35 AM
Apart from Psycho my favourite Hitchcock movie has to be North by Northwest.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: The Schofield Kid on March 03, 2012, 11:53:10 PM
Anyone know much about this film being made at the moment?

Alfred Hitchcock And The Making Of Psycho (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0975645/)

Anthony Hopkins playing Hitchcock, Scarlett Johansson playing Janet Leigh and James D'Arcy playing Anthony Perkins.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on March 03, 2012, 11:57:45 PM
Who's playing Mother? :D
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on March 04, 2012, 08:43:58 AM
Anyone know much about this film being made at the moment?

Alfred Hitchcock And The Making Of Psycho (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0975645/)

Anthony Hopkins playing Hitchcock, Scarlett Johansson playing Janet Leigh and James D'Arcy playing Anthony Perkins.
I just read something about this a day or two ago on IMDb. It sounds interesting, though I'm curious about what type of movie could possibly be made about the making of Psycho. ???

I do think Hopkins is a good choice to play Hitchcock.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on September 13, 2012, 05:40:27 PM
Quote

 On the occasion of 30th death anniversary of Hitchcock, there are on parade of his movies on TV.
 
 " Rear Window" (1954 )   I like this couple in this movie, especially Grace Kelly was sublime!   8)

 " FRENZY " ( 1972)

 " The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1934 ) Original version for a first time. I prefer the second ( 1956 ) with Doris and Jimmy!  :D 


 And this year on the 30th death anniversary of Grace Kelly!!  :(

 Then again...
 
Quote
 
 " Dial M for Murder "  1954 With Ray Milland, Grace Kelly.
 
 One of best film in the mystery genre.   Grace Kelly is beautiful and sublime as usual.   :)
 
 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/48/Dial_M_For_Murder.jpg)
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dial_M_For_Murder.jpg

 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9a/Dial_M.jpg)
 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dial_M.jpg
 


  " To Catch a Thief " 1955    With Grace Kelly and Cary Grant.  John Williams and Charles Vanel.

 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8b/To_Catch_a_Thief.jpg)
  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Catch_a_Thief
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: The Schofield Kid on January 19, 2013, 05:05:20 PM
Anyone know much about this film being made at the moment?

Alfred Hitchcock And The Making Of Psycho (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0975645/)

Anthony Hopkins playing Hitchcock, Scarlett Johansson playing Janet Leigh and James D'Arcy playing Anthony Perkins.

I'd forgotten I'd posted this. I should have posted my review of the film here. :-[

Anyway, what I wanted to ask was about the film Blackmail. Having just bought the DVD, I was wondering if this film is a silent or an early talky? I was looking at imdb but I didn't want to read too much and get a spoiler about the film. Is there two versions or is it just the first 10 minutes that are silent?
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on January 19, 2013, 05:07:39 PM
Anyway, what I wanted to ask was about the film Blackmail. Having just bought the DVD, I was wondering if this film is a silent or an early talky? I was looking at imdb but I didn't want to read too much and get a spoiler about the film. Is there two versions or is it just the first 10 minutes that are silent?
It's a talky. In fact, it was one of the first British talkies, if I remember right.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: The Schofield Kid on January 19, 2013, 05:08:58 PM
Thanks Christopher. :)

I thought you'd might know. :D
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on January 19, 2013, 06:47:47 PM
Quote
Having begun production as a silent film, the studio, British International Pictures, decided to convert it to sound during shooting. A silent version was released for theaters not equipped for sound (at 6740 feet), with the sound version (7136 feet) released at the same time. The silent version still exists in the British Film Institute collection.

Quote
The film began production as a silent film. To cash in on the new popularity of talkies, the film's producer, John Maxwell of British International Pictures, gave Hitchcock the go-ahead to film a portion of the movie in sound. Hitchcock thought the idea absurd and surreptitiously filmed almost the entire feature in sound (the opening 6 and a half minutes of the sound version are in silent with musical accompaniment), along with a silent version for theatres not yet equipped for talking pictures.

Blackmail, marketed as one of Britain's earliest "all-talkie" feature films, was recorded in the RCA Photophone sound-on-film process. (The first U.S. all-talking film, Lights of New York, was released in July 1928 by Warner Brothers.)

Lead actress Anny Ondra was raised in Prague and had a heavy Czech accent that was felt unsuitable for the film. Sound was in its infancy at the time and it was impossible to post-dub Ondra's voice. Rather than replace her and re-shoot her portions of the film, actress Joan Barry was hired to actually speak the dialogue off-camera while Anny lip-synched them for the film. This makes Ondra's performance seem slightly awkward.

Ondra's career in the UK was hurt by sound. She returned to Germany and retired from films after making a few additional movies and marrying boxer Max Schmeling in 1933.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackmail_%281929_film%29

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b3/Blackmail1.jpg)

Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on January 19, 2013, 08:14:25 PM
^That's certainly interesting! 8)
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: higashimori on October 13, 2013, 05:19:25 PM

 " Rebecca "  1940   With  Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine and Judith Anderson.....

 For me, Rebecca is most dramatic film among the works of Hitchcock.  :)

 (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/16/Rebecca_1940_film_poster.jpg)
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_%281940_film%29
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Rawhide7 on January 14, 2016, 01:51:27 AM
Any of you own the 1948 movie rope. Directed by Hitchcock and starring jimmy Stewart. Have you seen this before?  I am trying to buy some classic movies. I really enjoyed rear window and this movie Rope looks pretty good. What are your thoughts about it?  I have been into watching and buying older classic movies. I enjoy movies that have Hollywood legends like Judy garland, Kim Novak, Grace Kelly, Micky Rooney, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, etc. Thise are some of my favorite classic actresses and actors.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on January 14, 2016, 02:33:29 AM
Rope is good -- but spend your money on Eastwood films so you can do our Eastwood Movie Challenge!

But if you really want Hitchcock, my 10 favorites are Rebecca, Marnie, Notorious, North by Northwest, Spellbound, Rear Window, Psycho, The Birds, Strangers on a Train, and Vertigo. Argh, I need room for at least one more:  The Wrong ManRope doesn't make my cut.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Rawhide7 on January 14, 2016, 02:44:33 AM
Thanks Matt. Yeah I'm fixing to purchase more Eastwood movies I don't own. And I'm getting 12 Angry men as well. I already own rear window and I really enjoyed that one. I rented vertigo last night and watched it for the very first time and for some reason I really didn't take to that one. I think it's because I was tired and had a bad sinus headache. Because I'm in the minority on that movie. I mean I didn't think it was just terrible. I thought it was okay. But I actually enjoyed watching rear window better. I plan on watching vertigo again and when I'm well rested and feel better. Because I read online that back in 2012 it was voted the greatest movie ever made. I do defenately want to revisit that movie. Thanks for that list. Rope looked good based on the trailer. But it didn't even make your list.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on January 14, 2016, 02:59:52 AM
Rope has an interesting gimmick ... if you can buy or rent it cheap or borrow it from the library, you might watch it and see if you can figure it out. (If the trailer didn't give it away.)

By the way, Matt's list left off Shadow of a Doubt ... sometimes said by Hitchcock to be his own favorite. Say, isn't there a Hitchcock thread around here somewhere? ???

Say again, why are we all three online at five o'clock in the morning? ??? ???
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on January 14, 2016, 03:02:21 AM
It's only 4:00 here, but I'm not even beginning to feel tired. Out of sleeping pills. :(

Yeah, Rope is definitely worth watching, but not one I'd purchase.

I can't remember Shadow of a Doubt. I need to watch that one again soon.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on January 14, 2016, 03:13:06 AM
Well, I'm going (back) to bed (had a long nap earlier). Good night, all night owls.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on January 14, 2016, 04:46:24 AM
I like Rope a lot and have seen it many times, but I'm not so sure about recommending it as a blind purchase, because I'm not sure how many times you will want to watch it. I'd recommend something else by Hitchcock, like Shadow of a Doubt, which is my third favorite Hitch film, or North by Northwest, which is my second favorite Hitch film, and one of the most rewatchable films ever.

Somewhere on this board is a Hitchcock thread.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on January 14, 2016, 08:04:00 AM
Somewhere on this board is a Hitchcock thread.

I found it ... merger accomplished. :)
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Rawhide7 on January 14, 2016, 06:57:26 PM
Thanks everybody,

Yeah I am defenately a night owl.  It was actually 4am here where I live as well.  This site is addictive!
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on March 10, 2017, 06:31:15 PM
I just watched Rope again. I'd seen it years ago, and then just saw where Rawhide had asked if people had seen it earlier in this thread. I think it's a terrific movie.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on July 11, 2017, 07:11:34 AM
Turner Classic Movies is doing Hitchcock movies two nights a week for the month of July (Wednesdays and Fridays), so last Friday night I watched Number Seventeen and the 1934 version of The Man who Knew too Much. There was nothing special about the first one, but I was very pleased with the original Man who Knew too Much. I didn't realize the 1956 film had been changed so much, besides the basic plot line and the assassination attempt sequence. I still like the 1956 film better (and it's one I've been wanting to watch again), but I definitely enjoyed the original film.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Gant on July 26, 2017, 02:17:35 PM
My Mum saw Psycho at the cinema when it was released and never got over it.. !!!
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 14, 2018, 12:26:50 PM
I was curious if we had a Hitchcock thread. I just found this and since I think I'm going to be watching more Hitchcock films, I'd like to revive this thread.

I am going to repost my reaction to the first Hitchcock movie which I saw here to re-start this discussion:

I watched "Dial M for Murder" this weekend. It was randomly on TV and I decided to check it out. I don't think I'd ever seen an Alfred Hitchcock movie before. I liked it!
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 14, 2018, 12:41:23 PM
I finished "Vertigo" last night. I think I set myself up for disappointment, since I had read during my research on Hitchcock films that Sight and Sound magazine had listed it as the number one movie of all time. I have to confess, I don't really understand why. I preferred "Dial M For Murder."

"Vertigo" was definitely worth watching and I'm glad I saw it, but why is it listed as one of the best movies of all time? Does anyone know?

I actually watched it over two days since I had difficulty getting through it initially. All those scenes with "Madeline" acting potentially possessed and the retired detective running around town acting like a lovesick puppy because of a girl he barely knew got a bit old to me after awhile. 

To me, it got much more interesting SPOILERS FOLLOW FOR VERTIGO...........after Madeline, from the detectives perspective, threw herself off the building. I definitely really enjoyed the twist. I did not see it coming that an imposter, Judy, had been acting as Madeline and that her husband used the retired detectives illness as cover to murder her. I wasn't a big fan of the ending though, when Judy randomly fell off the building when the nun came in to ring the bell, and found those scenes where Jimmy tried to remake Judy into Madeline to be extremely disturbing and uncomfortable to watch. 

I can definitely see the appeal of Hitchcock though. He's pretty masterful at creating the environment and setting the scenes that are needed in order to create the story that he seeks to tell. 

What does everyone else think of "Vertigo?"
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 14, 2018, 01:46:01 PM
All those scenes with "Madeline" acting potentially possessed and the retired detective running around town acting like a lovesick puppy because of a girl he barely knew got a bit old to me after awhile. 



 ;D I mean, it's JAMES STEWART.  If he wasn't running around after a girl he barely knew like a lovesick puppy, who would?

To me, black and white movies, and classics like Vertigo are just special experiences -- it's a time capsule. Few of these movies still feel new, but many are still very exciting and thrilling. I love the way it feels ... like history. It's exciting to think of how they did the photography back in the days before CGI. Like, this shot from Hitchcock's Saboteur:

(http://prettycleverfilms.com/files/2012/11/Saboteur-statue.jpg)

AKA, I'm jealous that you have all these great films to discover for the first time. Think of them as cinema history lessons if you must. Watch Citizen Kane, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (though James Stewart will run around a bit more -- not quite like a lovesick puppy, but still, classic James Stewart), and definitely Cassablanca and maybe Rebecca, one of my favorite Hitchcock films.

Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 14, 2018, 01:51:53 PM
Actually, I've been thinking of getting the Movie Club going again. Maybe we should do some favorite classic films, and get a schedule together. Stay tuned after baseball has ended next month.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on September 14, 2018, 10:28:52 PM
AKA, those scenes in Vertigo "where Jimmy tried to remake Judy into Madeline" ARE "extremely disturbing and uncomfortable to watch." I'm not sure they were meant to be so, but it's hard to see them any other way. I think that is part of the reason why some critics rate the film so highly. I don't agree, though ... I admit that it hypnotically beautiful to look at, but I much prefer several other Hitchcock films, for instance North by Northwest, Rear Window and (among black and white films) Shadow of a Doubt, which Hitchcock himself ranked among his personal favorites.

You'll find little that's "uncomfortable to watch" in at least the first two of those.  :)
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 15, 2018, 06:39:41 AM

AKA, I'm jealous that you have all these great films to discover for the first time. Think of them as cinema history lessons if you must. Watch Citizen Kane, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (though James Stewart will run around a bit more -- not quite like a lovesick puppy, but still, classic James Stewart), and definitely Cassablanca and maybe Rebecca, one of my favorite Hitchcock films.

I've actually seen "Mr Smith Goes To Washington." Thanks for the other recommendations!
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 15, 2018, 06:45:34 AM
AKA, those scenes in Vertigo "where Jimmy tried to remake Judy into Madeline" ARE "extremely disturbing and uncomfortable to watch." I'm not sure they were meant to be so, but it's hard to see them any other way. I think that is part of the reason why some critics rate the film so highly. I don't agree, though ... I admit that it hypnotically beautiful to look at, but I much prefer several other Hitchcock films, for instance North by Northwest, Rear Window and (among black and white films) Shadow of a Doubt, which Hitchcock himself ranked among his personal favorites.

You'll find little that's "uncomfortable to watch" in at least the first two of those.  :)

KC, it's heartening to hear that I am not crazy and that you also prefer other Hitchcock films. Was anyone else underwhelmed by "Vertigo?" or have a historical perspective to offer for why it's seen as one of the best films ever? Upon its release, it was apparently not critically or commercially successful, so there does appear to have been a re-evaluation of it decades later and I'd be interested to learn why people think that occurred. 

I think I will watch "Rear Window." That does sound interesting, and I recently read a book, "Woman in the Window" (which will soon me made into a movie starring Amy Adams) that was clearly based in part off of that story.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 15, 2018, 08:38:33 AM
AKA, so you haven't seen Psycho yet?  Put yourself down for Rear Window on the movie club schedule, and think about recommending Psycho. It's a movie everyone should see at least once.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 15, 2018, 03:44:09 PM
I haven’t seen “Psycho.” On Imdb, they state it’s partly a horror movie. Is that true? That doesnt seem to fit the plot description to me. I really hate horror movies though, so if its in that genre, I don’t think I’d like it. I’m definitely up for watching Rear Window.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on September 15, 2018, 04:37:48 PM
I mentioned in the first post of this thread that Vertigo is my favorite Hitchcock movie, and that's still true. I LOVE the punch in the gut ending.

I remember the first time I watched the movie was shortly before Jimmy Stewart died, which would place that in 1997. I liked the movie then, but it wasn't until I was in college and watched the movie three times to write a paper about it that it became my favorite (and that would have been around 2003). Yes, Stewart's character falls in love awfully fast, but watching him become unhinged just isn't something you'd typically expect from one of his characters. Of course Stewart wasn't afraid to get a bit dark with some of his roles, and he pulled it off wonderfully in Vertigo. It's my favorite performance from Stewart.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 15, 2018, 06:44:50 PM
I haven’t seen “Psycho.” On Imdb, they state it’s partly a horror movie. Is that true? That doesnt seem to fit the plot description to me. I really hate horror movies though, so if its in that genre, I don’t think I’d like it. I’m definitely up for watching Rear Window.

Yeah, it technically can be considered horror, so can The Birds. But, they're not like horror films today. They are psychological dramas with horror aspects that I think helped spawn the horror films that we know today. I'm not sure, but it's possible Psycho could be considered the first slasher film. But don't let that scare you away (pun intended). It's too good a drama for one horror-type scene to keep you from watching one of the best acting performances in history, and some damn fine directing.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Gant on September 15, 2018, 11:33:44 PM
Back in the mid eighties some of Hitchcock's most famous films were re-released in the cinema in London and that's where I got to see them for the first time... Rear Window totally blew me away and I still think of it as my favourite of his..

To this day when I'm travelling and or staying somewhere new I'll check the view from the window to see if there's a " rear window" type view... Often there is and it never fails to set my imagination racing...

My top 5

Rear Window
Rebecca
Psycho
Strangers on a Train
North by Northwest
 
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on September 16, 2018, 01:23:07 PM
What does everyone else think of "Vertigo?"

I've always been a bit underwhelmed by Vertigo as well, and I've seen it a bunch of times, including many times as a kid. But the last time I watched it might be the closest I've come to appreciating it the way others seem to do. I think the trick is see it strictly through a psychological perspective. The plot is so outlandish, but if you focus on Scottie's obsession, you can get more out of it.

Like KC, my three favorite Hitchcock films are Rear Window, North by Northwest, and Shadow of a Doubt, but I like or love just about all of his films.

Here's an interesting video I saw a couple years ago focusing on one scene in Vertigo.

https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 17, 2018, 09:53:02 AM

Here's an interesting video I saw a couple years ago focusing on one scene in Vertigo.


That was cool -- a mini film class. It's interesting how the blocking plays into the subconscious when you watch it, because non-film students wouldn't think about all that, and yet we still get the feelings that Hitchcock wanted to get across with the blocking.

Doug, how about joining us for some of the Hitchcock movies in our Movie Club? Shadow of a Doubt still hasn't been nominated. You don't have to participate in all of them, maybe just the ones that you haven't seen in a while.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Gant on September 17, 2018, 12:57:14 PM
Wow... That was brilliant, thanks for posting..

I do think Vertigo is a grower. I was a little disappointed the first time I saw it but have enjoyed it more and
More with subsequent viewings...
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 23, 2018, 05:26:02 AM
How's Marnie? I like Sean Connery and was intrigued that he was in a Hitchcock film.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 23, 2018, 08:38:25 AM
Marnie is another of my favorites!  I would love to watch this again. Maybe 2 more bonus films?  ;)
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: AKA23 on September 23, 2018, 10:05:51 AM
It sounds like you're a pretty big Hitchcock fan, Matt. As directors go, is he your second favorite after Eastwood?

I'd be down for adding "Marnie" to the schedule if others are also interested in seeing it.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Matt on September 23, 2018, 05:01:12 PM
It sounds like you're a pretty big Hitchcock fan, Matt. As directors go, is he your second favorite after Eastwood?

Yeah, he probably is. His movies are just so great, but his casting is also divine. These are the screen gods and goddesses in some of their best roles. They're classic films that are intelligent, mysterious, romantic, and so well acted. Sean Connery, James Stewart, Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier, Henry Fonda, and Gregory Peck are some of the best golden screen actors, and then they're paired with royalty (literally) Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, Kim Novak, Eva Marie Saint, the list goes on and on. When I said earier that I like classic films because it's like a time capsule and a bit of history, this is exactly what I meant, and probably half the reason I love these films.

Quote
I'd be down for adding "Marnie" to the schedule if others are also interested in seeing it.

Okay, we now have it on there as a second bonus. That brings us right to the week before Christmas.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: The Schofield Kid on September 23, 2018, 05:32:48 PM
Sean Connery, James Stewart, Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier, Henry Fonda, and Gregory Peck are some of the best golden screen actors, and then they're paired with royalty (literally) Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, Kim Novak, Eva Marie Saint, the list goes on and on.

Did Hitchcock ever write an autobiography?

Or has anyone read a good biography on him?

That list of actors make me wonder did they rush at the chance to be in a Hitchcock film or Hitchcock chose them?
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on September 23, 2018, 06:28:58 PM
Hitchcock never wrote an autobiography, and you won't like him very much (as a person, not as a director) if you read any of the more thorough biographies out there, such as Donald Spoto's The Dark Side of Genius (1983; reprinted to mark the Hitch centenary in 1999).
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: KC on September 23, 2018, 06:55:46 PM
Here's an interesting video I saw a couple years ago focusing on one scene in Vertigo.

https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw

Excellent. Thanks for posting that, Doug.

For those who wondered, the name behind "Nerdwriter" is Evan Puschak.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: The Schofield Kid on September 23, 2018, 08:47:20 PM
https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw


That was great.


If you have a spare 64 minutes, watch the Dick Cavett show from 1972 with Hitchcock. Very interesting.

https://www.youtube.com/v/OvNla9-u6xM

Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Gant on September 24, 2018, 01:01:55 AM
I recently played at a converted cinema in East London, Walthamstow where Hitch went as a kid to see movies.. Amazing building, I've got photo's but unfortunately they're on my phone so I can't upload..
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on September 24, 2018, 11:04:53 PM
How's Marnie? I like Sean Connery and was intrigued that he was in a Hitchcock film.

Funny, I've never thought very highly of Marnie. Of his 60s movies, it's my second least favorite ahead of Torn Curtain. Yes, I think I like Topaz more.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Doug on September 28, 2018, 04:10:22 AM
I watched The 39 Steps tonight, which I had not seen before, despite what I wrote earlier. I also watched the 30s version of The Man Who Knew Too Much, also a first-time viewing of the movie. I have these movies from a collection of early Hitchcock movies I have, and the quality could certainly be better, and maybe that played a factor in my lack of appreciation for The Man Who Knew Too Much, or maybe I'm just too familiar with the 50s remake, but I was underwhelmed. I really liked The 39 Steps, though. The Lady Vanishes is included in this collection, but when I first watched it, it was a good quality DVD. I remember that, because it was the very first DVD I ever watched on my then new computer which had a DVD player before I had a stand alone player, and the picture quality was quite exceptional. I'm hesitant to even bother with this version of the movie.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on September 28, 2018, 06:26:58 AM
That's probably close to the same cheap set I have of Hitchcock's early films, Doug. I can't remember if it was earlier this year or last year that I watched the 1930s version of The Man Who Knew Too Much for the first time, but I liked it.
Title: Re: Alfred Hitchcock
Post by: Christopher on April 11, 2024, 08:36:07 AM
I haven't seen any of his silent films, and I'd think The Lodger would probably be a must.
Well, it took me a while but I finally watched The Lodger last night, along with Sabotage. Both were first time watches for me. I liked both. The Lodger is maybe one of the best silent movies I've seen, but my silent movie watching is still limited.