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Messages - Speedzoo

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General Discussion / Re: If You Could Pick Clint's Next Project ...
« on: February 02, 2020, 12:00:06 AM »
Hey Speedzoo! Long time, no see. Great to have you back. For anyone who hasn't been around since the dawning of the Clint Eastwood Web Board, Speedzoo is one of our first members, dating back to the last millennium.

Thanks, Matt. Even though I haven't posted anything in ages, I've definitely continued visiting this site over the years -- especially the "Eastwood News" section, always enjoying reading what my fellow Eastwood fans were saying about announced projects as well as their thoughts on the finished products. I've just been more of an anonymous lurker. Even now, I'm not sure that I'm going to post frequently like I once did, but I felt like re-registering ... and reassuming my old screen name. ;)

I'm still very much an Eastwood fan (even if I really wish that he hadn't devoted a decade almost exclusively to biopics). I recently had the joy of buying a ticket to the "Richard Jewell" premiere at the Chinese Theatre, getting assigned a seat at the far right corner of the very front row. It was such a horrible place to sit to watch a movie, but I literally had a front-row seat when Clint walked up to the podium and, surrounded by the cast, introduced his film. And I'm pretty sure that was Saul Rubinek who walked right past me in the theatre lobby near the concession stand. ;)

I think I was still in college when I was an active member on this site. Since graduating and working in journalism, I've been able to interview a few people with Eastwood connections. As a lifelong Eastwood fan, it was cool to get to talk on the phone with John Lee Hancock (writer of one of my favorite Eastwood films, "A Perfect World") and Mario Van Peebles (Stitch Jones himself!), as well as to sit down with the three real-life heroes from "The 15:17 to Paris" at a press junket.   

I wondered if it was the "real" Speedzoo! ;D

I agree with Matt ... great to see you around again!  8)

Thanks, KC. Yes, it's the "real" Speedzoo -- even if I am now ranked as a "newbie" with one credited post. ;) It's nice interacting with all of you again. :)

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General Discussion / If You Could Pick Clint's Next Project ...
« on: January 30, 2020, 11:39:03 PM »
If you could choose Clint’s next projects for him, what would they be? Is there a book that he should adapt? A classic film that he should re-imagine? A new genre that he should tackle?

Well, these would be my two suggestions:

1) “Dragon Teeth”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragon_Teeth

Michael Crichton’s posthumous novel “Dragon Teeth” is set in the late 1800s during the early days of paleontology. Having loved Crichton novels as a middle-school student in the mid-1990s, I checked “Dragon Teeth” out of the library a while back and was surprised to discover that the novel was really … a western. Among other things, there are Indian attacks, gunfights, stagecoach passengers trying to fight off an ambush by outlaws, etc.

I would *love* it if Steven Spielberg, whose Amblin Entertainment owns the rights to “Dragon Teeth” and is apparently planning to make a limited series out of it, would instead get Clint to direct it as a film. Just imagine the buzz that would surround a new western directed by Clint Eastwood! It would also be historic in that it would be the first time that Clint has ever directed a western in which he didn’t also star.

Plus, “Dragon Teeth” is a western unlike any he has ever directed (i.e., a story with an arrogant young Easterner as its protagonist, a unique paleontology angle, historic settings like Deadwood and encounters with real-life western figures like Wyatt Earp, etc.) Therefore, it's a project that wouldn't encourage viewers/critics to make comparisons with “Unforgiven,” which is likely what has kept Clint from ever making another western. We’d get a great new western, yet “Unforgiven” would retain its status as the perfect “last Clint Eastwood western STARRING Clint Eastwood.”

2) “One for the Road”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_for_the_Road_(short_story)

“One for the Road,” which is included in Stephen King’s short story collection “Night Shift,” is such a great, atmospheric vampire tale. The heroes happen to be two older guys – one, a bartender; the other, one of the bar’s regular patrons – who assist a young guy who wanders into the bar one snowy night and tells them that his car broke down on the road several miles back -- just outside some town called Salem’s Lot -- and the man’s wife and small daughter are still in the car waiting for him to come back with help.

Of all the genres that Clint has tackled, he’s never done horror. And this one is a perfect vehicle for an older actor. It’s been a while since I read it, and the characters are probably supposed to be MUCH younger seniors and not 89-year-olds, but it's such a great little story and I could see Clint in something like it. (A more serious challenge, though, would be taking such a short, simple and straightforward story and stretching it into a two-hour movie, when it’s perhaps better suited to be an episode of an anthology TV series like “Tales from the Crypt.”)

But what great fun it would be to see Clint directing himself in something so different than anything he has ever done before. And, with the other lead character also being a senior citizen, there would be possibilities for pairing Clint with one of his legendary peers. Imagine Clint and Michael Caine onscreen together for the first time. Or just imagine Clint finally working with Robert Duvall again. (Two of my favorite actors deserved a better collaboration than “Joe Kidd”!) Hey, Clint could even play on nostalgia for “Unforgiven” and “Million Dollar Baby” by casting Morgan Freeman! 

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