News: Having trouble registering?  Please feel free to contact us at help[at]clinteastwood.org.  We will help you get an account set up.


Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Topics - John Omohundro

Pages: [1]
1
Just wondering:

Did anyone else catch the goof with the money stolen from The Bank of El Paso by Indio's gang in FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE?

It's only on camera for a few seconds after Colonel Mortimer cracks the safe, but I believe that the banknotes which appeared briefly on camera were stamped "CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA".

Not unusual in  and of itself, except that the films were all set in the mid-1870s/early-1880s, and Confederate money was worthless to anyone except a currency collector after April 1865.

Funny how they'd make a mistake like that, especially since THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY wasn't filmed until later (it was the last one filmed, but the first one chronologically), and it was the only one of the three set during the Civil War.

--John Omohundro

2
Clint Eastwood Westerns / Basis for "Joe Kidd" ?
« on: January 06, 2004, 01:57:10 PM »
Hello, all!

I was looking at on-line reviews of some of Clint's older films, and a reviewer at www.amazon.com, the on-line bookstore, claims that JOE KIDD[/i] was based upon a book by Elmore Leonard.

I have the film on VHS videotape, and I know that he wrote the screenplay. I have also read that the original  title of the film was SINOLA[/i], after the nonexistent town in the New Mexico Territory where at least part of it took place. (Someone has a screenplay for JOE KIDD[/i]  on sale at www.barnesandnoble.com, and mentions that SINOLA[/i] was the original "working title", but I'm not willing to pay their asking price of $200-plus.) However, I wasn't aware that there was a book from which the film was adapted.

Would anyone out there happen to know what the title of the aforementioned book might be?

--John Omohundro

3
General Discussion / Clint's "-handedness" (right-, left- ? both?)
« on: January 03, 2004, 12:40:16 AM »
Just out of curiosity:

Would anyone happen to know which hand Mr. Eastwood favors?
That is, is he naturally right-handed, left-handed, or ambidextrous?

In most of his films, he's portrayed RIGHT-HANDED characters, but  four that I can think of break that rule:

JOE KIDD (shot pistol RIGHT-handed, but shot rifle LEFT-handed);

HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER (ditto);

THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES (shot pistols equally well with EITHER hand, and frequently used one pistol in EACH hand; however, shot rifle RIGHT-handed);
and

BRONCO BILLY (same as in above entry, except never used a rifle; threw knife with RIGHT hand)

There may be other films which I've forgotten, but those are the only ones which come to mind at the moment. Besides (and I'm almost ashamed to admit this), I haven't seen every film in which Mr. Eastwood has appeared.  ;)

As always, thanks in advance for any responses.

4
Clint Eastwood Westerns / Couple of questions about "Joe Kidd"
« on: September 17, 2003, 07:20:55 AM »
Hello all.

I have a couple of questions about "Joe Kidd", which was, until the release of "In the Line of Fire" and "Absolute Power", one of my all-time favorite Clint Eastwood flicks.

First of all--does anyone besides me consider it to be the FOURTH "Spaghetti Western"? In "A Fistful of Dollars", the old undertaker ("Silvanito") refers to Eastwood's character as "Joe".

Secondly, at the end of "For a Few Dollars More", when Eastwood's character (called "Manco" in this film) is asked by Colonel Mortimer (Lee Van Cleef) what he intends to do with all the money (the combined bounty on Indio's gang, and the reward posted by the Bank of El Paso for the return of its stolen money), "Manco" replies something to the effect that he wants to retire from bounty hunting and become a rancher--he even has a nice piece of property picked out!

Thirdly, in "Joe Kidd", when told by Frank Harlan (Robert Duvall) that he "used to hunt men", Kidd (Eastwood) replies "That was a LONG time ago..."

Make sense to anyone else here?

Also, I'd like to know if anyone else besides me has had any luck identifying the two rifles used by Eastwood and actor James Wainwright ("Olin Mingo") in the sniper duel in the middle of "Joe Kidd". I've identified Mingo's rifle as either a Remington-Keene (a .45-70 bolt-action built just after the Civil War) or a Winchester Hotchkiss (another .45-70 bolt-action--however, this one wasn't produced until the late 1870s/early 1880s). I haven't had as much luck with the unusual takedown rifle used by Eastwood as Joe, though. I think it's an early Mauser (given that the earliest Mausers came out in 1871, and "Joe Kidd" is, judging by the weapons present (Lamarr Simms' (Don Stroud) Mauser C1896 automatic, and Frank Harlan's Savage Model 1899), the rifle was most likely an early smokeless-powder Mauser--the earliest of them was either the 1888 "Commission Rifle" (a combination of Mauser and Mannlicher designs), or the Model 1893 7mm, used by Spain in the Spanish-American War of 1898.

Any ideas?

Sorry I ran on for so long, BTW. :)
--John

Pages: [1]



C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T