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KC
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« Reply #360 on: June 21, 2003, 02:06:07 PM »

KC: Eastwood accords you an interview. But since he doesn't have much spare time, he would like you to accompany him on a mountain climbing tour (not too difficult, but with small paths where you see right down the mountain without anything to hold unto). Do you agree?
 Sorry, Clint!  :'(
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bcm
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« Reply #361 on: June 21, 2003, 02:21:03 PM »

Love your blue smilie  :D
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« Reply #362 on: June 21, 2003, 04:21:06 PM »


From MGK :

Quote
Philo: Which film do you think that Eastwood appeared to have the most fun makiing?


From the location scenes I have seen I would say all of them. If we are talking on screen , Michael Cimino said that he wanted to make Clint laugh and he sure does in Thunderbolt and Lightfoot. Every which way but loose is the other film that he appears to enjoy himself.


Tagging :

The stranger

Which Eastwood film that you missed would you most like to see on the big screen ?


Matt

Should there ever be a get together of Clint Eastwood board memebers ?



Philo .
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« Reply #363 on: June 21, 2003, 04:26:22 PM »

AKA: You've been selected to handle the release date and schedule of Mystic River. When (date) and how (wide, limited, etc.) do you release Mystic River in theaters to maximize box office and awards potential?

I've thought about this some more, MC. Thanks for the question.

 As a fan of Clint's and a filmgoer, it's frustrating to have to wait months and months to see a film that's already been completed, just because the studio wants to make the most money possible. However, if I was then a part of that studio, and my responsibility was to maximize box office potential, which ordinarily I wouldn't really care about, then I may keep Mystic River right where it is. Either way, Mystic River will probably be forgotten for major awards (a nomination for one of the actors is not so implausible), so I don't think it will really make all that much difference. I don't see Mystic River securing lots of nominations in the big categories come Oscar time, but in scheduling the film one would need to acknowledge that possibility. For awards and things like that, the Sepember/October time period is supposed to be good for exposure, so we'll just have to see. It might have been even better to have released it following the Cannes Film Festival, as it seemed to get a lot of praise there as being one of the better films this year, and following on the heels of such success, having a release closely following that festival, when the film would still be close to the forefront of many people's minds in the industry, might not have been such a bad idea. That way the film would be able to take advantage of the recent positive publicity more effectively.

However, I think you also have to take into account the fact that this film has a very liberal cast, and given the current political climate, there may be quite a few people who, for whatever reason, take issue with the stars of the film, which could hurt box office success. Sure, it's probably a small minority of people who would boycott the film on account of the cast, but waiting a bit longer, as the studio is doing with its September release, will help to ease tensions and the anger of some people may fade with time. So, either releasing it in the September/October time period, or shortly after the Cannes Film Festival, would probably be good for the film and there are advantages and disadvantages to both time periods. Does that answer your question? Agree or disagree? What were your thoughts?

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AKA23
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« Reply #364 on: June 21, 2003, 04:52:47 PM »


AKA23 - In a parallel universe, Clint never took up directing. However, he did have the clout to pick and choose his projects, and to look for films that best suited the kinds of issues he wanted to address. Therefore, his filmography remained the same. What movie do you think would have suffered the most minus Clint as a director, and are there any you feel would have been better without him sitting in the Big Chair?

It's always tough for me to try to assess the influence of the director in a film. Who's to say how much of that influence is in the finished product of the film. I think as a lay person, and somebody who doesn't necessarily have a great conception of the duties of a director, the importance of a director to the overall feel of the film and the project in general, sometimes it seems as if I don't necessarily know what was the directorial touch that Eastwood added, the thing that was different, how much of the general aura of the film would be different had he not been a part of it. Sometimes it's impossible to discern these things until they aren't there and you realize, wait a minute, this doesn't feel like it should. I'm not used to it being done this way. This feels different than his other films. Unless you sense the ABSENCE of something that was there previously, it's difficult to assess what kind of an impact was made day to day and in the overall realization of the vision of a particular film. Does this make sense to you?

This being said, I think either Unforgiven or A Perfect World would probably have suffered the most without Clint as a director. In the case of Unforgiven , this was the film that led people to respect Eastwood more as a director, so you've got to acknowledge that the film was very well directed, and not only that, but that had Eastwood not been involved in the directing of this picture, it may have been very very different. It's possible that somebody else directing the film might not have had the same passion for the story, the same resolve to do it right, or the same vision with respect to the film. Another director might have tried to make the William Munny character more sympathetic, feeling that he was too amoral to connect with audiences who were looking for a more traditionalist western where the good guy triumphs over evil. Another director might have left the ending less ambiguous, might have included the homecoming scene, might have included a few scenes about Munny's past, might have given us more backgroud, more of a sense of who this person was before Claudia. Another director might not have had the sense to recognize the brilliance in David Webb People's script, might have changed it around, might have added too much, taken away too much. Another director might not have had the sense or the inclination to put on film what already worked as a script. In trying to improve on it, another director could have changed some of the things that made it work, making it worse, and not better. For all these reasons, and more, Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven in large part because it is just that, Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven . If it had been somebody else's [] Unforgiven [/I], if they had the opportunity to put forth their own vision, it could have been a very different film, having suffered greatly.

As you yourself have pointed out Eutressor, A Perfect World works in large part again because of Eastwood's part as director. A lot of it is highly stylized, some would say more than most of Clint's self-directed films, and for that reason alone, for that presence of an abundance of directorial touches here and there that combine together to contribute to this fully realized whole, the film would have suffered greatly without Clint as director. Not only this, but due to the co-starring role of Clint in this one, his role as director was far more important than his role as an actor. His impact on the production as director/producer far outshadowed, in my mind anyway, his role as an actor. It could be argued that a fair number of people COULD have possibly played the Red Garnett character, perhaps differently, perhaps not as well as Eastwood, but it can be argued that perhaps only Eastwood could have it realized in the way that he did as director. It can also be argued quite well that one of the strongest points of the film, the acting, was related to Eastwood's ability to get the most effective and the best performance out of both Kevin Costner and the little boy who played Philip. I don't think just anybody could have gotten those performances out of the actors. Just looking at Kevin Costner's range of performances, with a different director, we could have had a very different performance. Eastwood was able to get the best out of Costner. With another director, without that passion and that ability, who knows what we might have seen on the screen from principal actors in the film.

As far as films where it may have been better had Eastwood sat out on the directing, I can point to a few, but I don't know if the films would have actually been better without Eastwood as a director. I think they would have been different films. Whether or not that would have improved the quality of the film, or made it more enjoyable, that's very difficult to say. Eastwood has been criticized for the lackluster pace of a lot of his films, and two films where somebody else might have done it better, possibly, are both Absolute Power and True Crime . With the race against the clock story of True Crime I think a lot of people were expecting a faster paced, more suspenseful film. Both films were very slow paced, and may have benefited a bit had somebody picked up the pace a bit, injected a little more suspense and nail biting tension into the story. I think In the Line of Fire would have been a very different film had Eastwood directed it, and for some of these same reasons, it probably turned out better because Wolfgang Peterson was the director.

What do you think of these comments Eustressor? What do you agree with? What do you disagree with, and how would you answer the same question? Your question was quite loaded Eustressor, so I do hope that I've given it the time and the respect that it deserved. I did my best given the circumstances.
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AKA23
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« Reply #365 on: June 21, 2003, 04:55:35 PM »

AKA23: which movie of Eastwood's career do you think is the most good (in the sense of the least immoral)

BCM, I must confess that I don't really understand this question. Is there any way that you could perhaps clarify it a bit for me, perhaps using different language, so that I would better be able to answer it? Somebody asked me what Eastwood film had the most positive message, is this the same question, just with different words? Is the intent the same as asking me which was the most positive? I'm having difficulty understanding the meainging of the "least immoral." I answered Bronco Billy in that question. I'd love to be able to answer your question, but I need a little bit more information. Thank you! :)
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the stranger
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« Reply #366 on: June 21, 2003, 05:09:15 PM »

From Philo
Quote
Which Eastwood film that you missed would you most like to see on the big screen ?
Pretty Easy really, It would be one of the few I have not seen on the big screen; which are Coogan's Bluff and The Eiger Sanction. I'd probably go for the later, simply because of the scope aspect of the movie.
I did have the Universal 8 2 x400 FLAT which I screened in my living room on a 6ft screen, but I doubt if that counts right? ::) ;D ;D ;D
Cheers Philo :)
-Stranger-
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« Reply #367 on: June 21, 2003, 05:32:07 PM »

Clyde: What is your favorite Eastwood character and why?

Clint's most interesting character is "Unforgiven's" William Munny.  At times caring and human and then a brutal savage.  Not many films present a character as wide-ranging as this.  Clint was able to make both ends of Munny's spectrum crystal clear.  A fantastic character done justice with an excellent potrayal.
P.S. Matt, thanks for the tip to the "Dollars" vs. "Yojimbo" board.


tag to...

Matt:  Hollywood's current way is sequels, remakes, or comic books.
a. Which Clint film that wasn't should have been "sequelized"?
b. Which Clint film would stand up for a remake?
c. Which Clint character could be the star of a daily newspaper comic strip?
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the stranger
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« Reply #368 on: June 21, 2003, 05:58:46 PM »

OK. I think I owe about 6 tags... been straining the brain for these, don't know if they have been asked already, but hey, who cares ;D
Philo
Jerry Goldsmith has never scored a Clint Eastwood movie, which film do you thing jerry would have done a good job on?

Matt
If you was in a Bathroom with Clint.. ;D ;D relax, just kidding!
What 70's or 80's TV Series do you think Clint would of worked well in?
KC
What 60's 70's or 80's film of Clint's do you think would of been interesting to see a sequel made?
MGK
M, what scene in any Clint film has made you laugh the hardest?
Christopher
If you could change an ending to any Clint film, which one and why?
D'amb
You have a camera, you have 36 shots only, you can be present at any one scene from any one film to use these 36 shots, which scene would you use up your film?


-Stranger- ;)
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« Reply #369 on: June 21, 2003, 06:11:52 PM »

From The Stranger :

Quote
Philo
Jerry Goldsmith has never scored a Clint Eastwood movie, which film do you thing jerry would have done a good job on?


Well I am a big fan of Goldsmith, Star trek, The Omen, Magic and Legend to name a few.
The problem is that I can't think of any Eastwood scores that could be replaced.
I think Jerry would have been at home on Where eagles dare or Kelly's heroes.


Tagging :

MGK

Was it right for Lightfoot to die ?


Philo .
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Doug
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« Reply #370 on: June 21, 2003, 09:13:11 PM »


Doug - Say you're on the staff at Malpaso (lucky you!). One afternoon, Lenny Niehaus marches out of Clint's office, shouting, "That's it! I'm through! You never let me play!" Clint follows him out and turns to you and says, "Find me a new composer - and I'm not talking about John Williams, either!" Who would you recommend?

Oh man, I'm the wrong person to ask this of.  The only film composers I can name are the ones everybody knows -- all three or four of them. I love Jerry Goldsmith, but his music wouldn't really fit Clint's movies -- and I don't think he's even working anymore these days, is he?  However I just saw About Schmidt, and I noticed the music was very subdued, and quite reminded me of Clint's use of music.  According to IMDB, the original music is by Rolfe Kent and Erik Satie -- so maybe that would be a start.  Or maybe I tell Clint I got the perfect guy, just give me a couple of weeks, and I send my own personal assistant ( ;D) to find some new young guy with a background in jazz and a yearning to score films, and we can shape him into the perfect man.  Really, that's the best answer I can give.  Sorry.



Doug: Who was the best Eastwood sidekick (not including the Dollars trilogy)?


I assume I'm not limited to genre ... so I'd have to say Jeff Bridges' Lightfoot.  He only ranks below Eli Wallach's Tuco for me as a favorite "sidekick" -- male co-star.  
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Doug
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« Reply #371 on: June 21, 2003, 09:22:17 PM »

Tags:

Holden Pike: How do you think the movie Thunderbolt and Lightfoot ranks against (or compares to) some of the great "buddy" action (action, western, etc.) films of the 1970's?  

KC: Which Clint directed movie do you watch the least?

Concorde: What's your favorite "gun scene" in a non-western Clint movie?
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« Reply #372 on: June 21, 2003, 09:23:56 PM »

Xichado: Is there a director that you'd like to see Eastwood work with? If so, who?

Hey Christopher. Doug asked me more or less the same question in the old tag thread, and I believe I said I would like to see Clint working with Tim Burton.

I like Tim Burton a lot, mainly because of “Edward Scissorhands”, a movie that captured (unknowingly) so much about my generation (Gen-X) thru the main character. Edward has all the characteristics of the Gen-Xers, those that do not see themselves as Beavis and Butthead, that is hard not to see myself reflected on Edward and on his emotions. By the way, I would love to see Johnny Deep work with Clint.

Anyway, when I watch the majority of Tim Burton’s movies I completely forget about everyone and everything around me, I feel like a little kid that is hearing a ghost story or a fairy tale for the first time… I am transported into another dimension and that is the reason why I like Burton.

A few others: Scott Hicks, director of Shine (liked it a lot) and Snow Falling on Cedars (loved it loved it loved it).

Sidney Pollack because I like the way he tells a story.


Xichado:  Your turn at the lottery question!  But this time... it's $2 million.  What do you do?  Work with Clint as Assistant Director on one of his films (no pay involved) or take the $2 million tax-free cash?

Still the same answer as before (last time was only $1 million)

Quote
Since I don’t really care about the money I would go with working with Clint.

Only because it would be the chance of a lifetime, it would be an experience to remember and cherish for the rest of my life. I would have the chance to work closely to someone I admire and maybe I could learn something about movie-making and from those teachings I could make my own movies and earn my own $1 million or 2 or 3…

the two million would solve a lot of my current problems but I still have to go with the (priceless) opportunity to work with Clint. :)
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KC
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« Reply #373 on: June 21, 2003, 09:25:50 PM »

Oh man, I'm the wrong person to ask this of.  The only film composers I can name are the ones everybody knows -- all three or four of them. I love Jerry Goldsmith, but his music wouldn't really fit Clint's movies -- and I don't think he's even working anymore these days, is he?  However I just saw About Schmidt, and I noticed the music was very subdued, and quite reminded me of Clint's use of music.  According to IMDB, the original music is by Rolfe Kent and Erik Satie -- so maybe that would be a start.  
I don't think Satie (1866-1925) would accept the commission, Doug, but come to think of it ... he might be a better answer than Richard Wagner for the tag Xichado gave me about classical music to accompany a video of "highlights and best moments of Clint Eastwood’s career." ;)
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« Reply #374 on: June 21, 2003, 09:48:35 PM »

KC
What 60's 70's or 80's film of Clint's do you think would of been interesting to see a sequel made?
Hmmm ... For a Few Dollars More? (Assuming it's the last in chronological order of the three "Dollars" films.)

It would have been interesting to see what he does with all that bounty money ... ;)

KC: Which Clint directed movie do you watch the least?
Probably Breezy, Doug ...  ;)



I'll try to post some more tags before this game ends tomorrow ... but sorry, not tonight.
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Doug
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« Reply #375 on: June 21, 2003, 10:10:37 PM »

I don't think Satie (1866-1925) would accept the commission, Doug, but come to think of it ... he might be a better answer than Richard Wagner for the tag Xichado gave me about classical music to accompany a video of "highlights and best moments of Clint Eastwood’s career." ;)

Didn't pick up on the date of birth (and date of death) ... but I did only say it was a place to start! ;D  The other guy is still alive though.  And I recognize some of the movies he's worked on -- of course I did for the films Satie contributed to as well...  And hey, he's not going to get all egotistical all of a sudden, right?!

Breezy!  I should have worded that question differently, now I see.  But still it's a interesting answer -- considering I've never seen the movie.  
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« Reply #376 on: June 22, 2003, 05:00:27 AM »

 
mgk: You are allowed (say by a leprechaun  ;)) to spend a one week holiday with a female character of your choice. Who do you choose, and why?

If I'm going on a holiday for a whole week, then I'm going to want someone who is ready to have some fun.  But, of course, I have to like her, too.  When I think about "fun," I tend to think of Strawberry Alice (Frances Fisher) from Unforgiven, Gus Malley (Sondra Locke) from The Gauntlet and Sister Sara (Shirley MacLaine) from Two Mules For Sister Sara.  But, as I list all three of those, I suddenly realize that I have just picked three prostitutes. ;D  We never got to see Strawberry Alice have much fun...she was angry during most of the movie.  Gus Malley might be a handful to handle and I wouldn't want to have to do that for a whole week.  So, I think I would choose Sister Sara because she seemed to have a great sense of humor but maybe not as belligerent as the other two.

MGK
M, what scene in any Clint film has made you laugh the hardest?

The first scene that came to mind for me, Stranger, is the scene that many people have mentioned that they thought was also funny.  When Francesca (Meryl Streep) tells Robert (Eastwood) in The Bridges of Madison County that the flowers he has just picked for her are poisonous and Robert immediately drops them, then Francesca tells him that she was just kidding is a really funny scene.  And, it keeps on being funny because Francesca can't quit laughing and Robert just keeps giving her "that look" that says so many things....it says, "I can't believe you just said that;" it says, "I like your sense of humor;" and, it says, "I think we're going to get along just fine."  That was an enjoyable and funny scene for me.

MGK
Was it right for Lightfoot to die ?

That's a really tough question, Philo, and one I had to think about for a while.  I think Lightfoot did have to die at the end.  We, the audience, had come to like the relationship that Thunderbolt and Lightfoot had cultivated and we were enjoying the "buddy" film that was so unusual for an Eastwood movie.  We really liked both of these characters a lot.  But, the movie would have lost all of its "punch" if Lightfoot had lived.  When he died, it made us go back in our minds and relive everything that happened up to that point and it made us ask the same question you just asked me: "Why did he have to die?"  We also needed to see the genuine, caring feelings that Thunderbolt had developed for this man as his friend and we needed to see the surprise that Thunderbolt felt in losing him.  If he had lived, it would have been just another "buddy" film with a happy ending and would not be a movie that we gave much thought to.  It's a great movie just as it is.

I'll be back with some tags.
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« Reply #377 on: June 22, 2003, 05:52:47 AM »


Matt

Should there ever be a get together of Clint Eastwood board memebers ?

I think it would be a great idea, and I'd love to meet everyone.  On the other hand, because our members are really spread all over the globe, it would be a big commitment to ask of everyone in order to make it worthwhile.  We really only have, (I'm estimating all of these numbers) about 40 active members.  Of these, probably 10 are in the UK, 5 more are in other parts of Europe, 4 are in Canada, 1 is in Australia, 1 is in South America, and the rest are scattered over every point of the US.  I'm at one extreme... the furthest southeast you can get.  KC's at another extreme... northeast, AKA another extreme: southwest, MGK's in Texas... basically, the way I see it, most of us would have to travel a long, long distance, no matter where we hold it.  And that would be worthwhile if we'd get enough members who would do it.  So really, it would depend on the level of commitment from everyone that would determine if there should be a web board get-together or not.
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« Reply #378 on: June 22, 2003, 06:03:15 AM »


Matt:  Hollywood's current way is sequels, remakes, or comic books.
a. Which Clint film that wasn't should have been "sequelized"?
b. Which Clint film would stand up for a remake?
c. Which Clint character could be the star of a daily newspaper comic strip?

a)  Hmmmm...  well, I don't think I'd want to see any of the films sequelized that weren't, but if I must choose, I'll say Pale Rider only because that movie really seems like only one episode of what could be many.  Where is Preacher off to now?  Where will he be summoned next, and what wrongs will he right there.  It's a possibility, but I'm glad it wasn't done.

b)  I read that Clint was very, very unhappy with the way Kelly's Heroes came out.  He said the script for it was great, but the finished product was just a lot of laughs, and nothing like the serious, anti-war film that he had expected to make.  I wondered when I read that, if Clint had ever thought of re-doing it, this time the way it was originally supposed to have been made, and with himself directing it to protect that vision.  So, I suppose my answer would be Kelly's Heroes

c)  Well, there's a whole Dirty Harry line of books, so I can easily see it being made into a newspaper cartoon strip.  

Tags comin'...
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« Reply #379 on: June 22, 2003, 06:06:15 AM »

Wow!Im gone for a day and this thread is 4 pages longer! ;D Ok thanks for the tag MC
Quote
Misty71: Since viewing Dirty Harry and becoming a big Eastwood fan, have you watched any Eastwood films that you felt matched (or at least approached) the greatness of the original Dirty Harry?

Yes, of course yes! Everytime I watched a Clint movie afterwards, I was impressed all over again!(exept maybe by the rookie) I saw "in the line of fire" and again, my jaw dropped at the floor, it was just so good. then the enforcer and so on. Everytime I see a Clint movie for the first time, Im always amazed. You cant get used to quality like that!But I have to admit, dirty harry remains among my top 5!

Be back with tags
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