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Author Topic: Quentin Tarantino  (Read 54554 times)
dane with no name
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« Reply #40 on: June 24, 2004, 06:58:38 AM »

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I love the Hopper and Walken scene, did any of you find this racist though ? I didn't, but what do the rest of you think ?
I dont think it racist per see, hopper use the word deliberatly to piss of Walken, not to offend black people directly. In the quote
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and your great-great-great-grandmother f*cked a n*gger, and she had a half-*ggerkid
he clearly associate walkens character with blacks no matter how pale he is, thus spitting him in the face while being tortured. He caps it off after asking vincent concotti (walkens character) if he´s lying,(which concotti agrees that he dont.)by telling him that he is half eggplant.
Tarantino takes it just to the edge, and stops there. Two of my black friends consider this their favorite scene as well so i dont think it´s racist at all. If it´s racist, it´s pointed at the sicillians, but as hopper says
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i´m quoting history
You cant really say anything about that...  ;)
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masterchief
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« Reply #41 on: June 24, 2004, 09:14:30 AM »

Tatantino was acctually told that by a black friend of his, and the way how you wind up an Sicillian is to compare them with a black person, I read somewhere.
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Doug
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« Reply #42 on: June 24, 2004, 10:16:12 AM »

And the whole point of the scene is to anger Walken's character enough that he'll kill him because he knows otherwise he will be tortured and will betray his son.   It's a great scene, exposing the false racial pride of this guy.  And it's the last redemptive act of a guy who's been a poor father his whole life.
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Christopher
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« Reply #43 on: July 17, 2004, 08:28:31 PM »

I just watched Reservoir Dogs. I liked it. Very interesting film. It has a nice pace to it as well, it didn't feel like I spent an hour and forty minutes with it.

Brendan, you mentioned early on in this thread that it was the first parallel film you'd seen (or at least you used words somewhat to that effect), but have you ever seen Stanley Kubrick's The Killing? Since every movie Tarantino has directed is like this, I'm guessing he has. ;) :D

I've only seen each of Tarantino's films once apiece (aside from Kill Bill Vol. 2, which I haven't seen yet), so I really can't make a list as to which I like the best. Plus, as I've mentioned, Pulp and Jackie were a few years back. But if I had to, I'd say:

Jackie Brown
Pulp Fiction
Reservoir Dogs

Kill Bill Vol. 1
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Brendan
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« Reply #44 on: July 18, 2004, 12:21:59 AM »

I just watched Reservoir Dogs. I liked it. Very interesting film. It has a nice pace to it as well, it didn't feel like I spent an hour and forty minutes with it.

I love Reservoir Dogs. I don't think I can say that enough. I love it becuase he was able to do so much, with so little. Pretty much all of the movie took place in one room with four characters (not including the cop), and Tarrantino managed to use the room and the performances to hold your interest and keep you on the egde of you seat until the end.

The pacing was also very well done, which goes with what I said about keeping you on the edge of your seat. I've seen two of the deleted scene, both of which were crap and were rightfully deleted. One consisted of Freddy (Mr. Orange) and his partner getting informatio about Mr. White's history. The scene dragged on and revealed too much about Mr. White, it's better that we don't know all that much about him. The other scene featured Mr. White, Mr. Pink and Nice Guy Eddie heading back to the rendezvous after ditching the cars and getting the diamonds. All it is is just Mr. White yelling at Nice Guy Eddie because he refuses to get a doctor for Mr. Orange. It was a waste of time and never accomplished anything, so with those scene edited out, the movie ended up perfect.

There were also differant angles of the famous ear cutting scene, which were close-ups of it being cut off. I liked it better that Tarrantino just panned away from the action and then panned back in. It was just... better.

Reservoir Dogs is truly and amazing film, and will forever be in my top ten.

Jackie Brown... ick. BORING. That about sums it up.

Christopher you should check out From Dusk Till Dawn. It's a stupid, cheesy movie, but I think you'd enjoy it alot.
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Christopher
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« Reply #45 on: July 18, 2004, 10:24:00 AM »

I remember going to see Jackie Brown in theatres and found to be extremely boring and disapointing. I have since re-watched it and enjoyed it a bit more, but it still doesn't compare to Pulp or Dogs.
Now it's "Ick. Boring." ???
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Brendan
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« Reply #46 on: July 18, 2004, 04:05:48 PM »

I enjoyed it more then I did before, but I still don't like it all that much, and it is still slightly boring. Perhaps a third viewing will change my mind.  ;D
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masterchief
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« Reply #47 on: August 08, 2004, 05:53:35 PM »

In Pulp Fiction, when Mia and Vince walk into 'Jack Rabbit Slims' what is the song in the background, I think it's by Ricky Nelson, and I think it goes:

1,2, Gonna find you too, 3,4, get down on the floor, 5,6 gonna get your ya kicks.

Thats the chorus, anyone know the name?
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Christopher
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« Reply #48 on: August 20, 2004, 08:28:01 PM »

I just saw Kill Bill Volume 2, and it's a whole heckuvalot better than Volume 1! I had hope that I'd like it better, but it even surprised me a little. It felt like a whole different movie to me.

I know my brother has recently seen both of these movies, though I don't know what he thought of Volume 2 yet. He told me that he remembered reading an interview with Tarantino back when the first movie came out where Tarantino said he broke the movie up into two parts because he was afraid the audience wouldn't be able to handle all the killing and blood, only my brother said he felt Volume 1 was...(shall I even say it amongst such fans on this board? :P)...boring ( :o). I didn't use that term myself, though I can understand it as I didn't find too much excitement in the movie. So, I'm quite interested in talking to him about Volume 2.

Hey, Matt, we might even agree once again on a movie! ;) ;D If you liked the first, you have to like the second one.
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Brendan
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« Reply #49 on: August 20, 2004, 08:40:11 PM »


I know my brother has recently seen both of these movies, though I don't know what he thought of Volume 2 yet... only my brother said he felt Volume 1 was...(shall I even say it amongst such fans on this board? :P)...boring ( :o).


One of the DVD reviewers over at IGN.com didn't like Volume 1 either and he got quite the load of hate mail for it. I don't see how Volume 1 could be boring, but I can understand why people wouldn't like it because of the violence.

Volume 2 is alot better and one of my only problems with it comes at the end, (I don't think I'm spoiling anything but look away if you must) when Bill and Beatrice are talking. Damn that just goes on for so long. And it's also slightly anti-climactic...
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masterchief
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« Reply #50 on: August 21, 2004, 03:55:22 AM »

(I don't think I'm spoiling anything but look away if you must) when Bill and Beatrice are talking. Damn that just goes on for so long. And it's also slightly anti-climactic...

I agree with you, we have been watching the two films for around three to four hours, and how she has gone on about killing Bill, and, when she is with him, they start talking! I was expecting a sword fight (or fire fight) that would be more entertaining than the 'O-Ren' fight, and end in some exreamly gory ending.
SPOILER!!!!!!!!!















But no, they have a ten minuite chat, and a 15 second fight. I was quite dissapointed with that

















SPOILER END

Also, I watched 'Jackie Brown' and, to be honest, I was as Brendan said:
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Jackie Brown... ick. BORING. That about sums it up.
And I completely agree with that.
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Christopher
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« Reply #51 on: August 21, 2004, 06:19:13 AM »

One of the DVD reviewers over at IGN.com didn't like Volume 1 either and he got quite the load of hate mail for it. I don't see how Volume 1 could be boring, but I can understand why people wouldn't like it because of the violence.
I don't think I've heard anybody say they didn't like it because of the violence. ??? The whole film is just fight scenes. It doesn't take the characters into consideration (I'm sure that's much like the kung fu movies being paid homage to). This led me to believe it would be a normal revenge movie (and not a great one at that). But Volume 2 complicates that a bit. Makes it a little more. I appreciated the style much more in 2 as well. I could feel the excitement in the fight scenes because I knew a little more about these people.

And I don't see how anybody could find Jackie Brown to be dull, so I guess we're all even there. ;)
« Last Edit: August 21, 2004, 06:21:29 AM by Christopher » Logged
Doug
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« Reply #52 on: August 21, 2004, 10:27:00 PM »

I may be repeating myself, but oh well.  I did not like Vol 1.  I had to see it twice in the theatres to make sure, but I felt the same about it after both times, that it was trashy and really quite stupid.  Scenes that were supposed to be funny weren't.  There's no suspense, just a lot of campy gore.  Vol 2 is a completely different movie, with great scenes, great action, and great surprises.  The time flew by while I watched it, I was so engrossed in the movie.  And I like the finale, I like its understatement.  And mostly I liked its emotional impact.  It's too bad Vol 1 is so bad, because instead of having a four hour movie to enjoy over and over, I only have the last hour and half.

And Jackie Brown is still my favorite of his movies.  Dull ... hardly!    :)
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"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
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« Reply #53 on: September 27, 2004, 08:20:17 PM »

Right now, Kill Bill Vol. 2 is my favorite movie. I've watched the DVD about 4 times since I got it a couple of weeks ago. But, does anyone know why Quentin Tarantino used different first names for this actor (Michael Parks)?





I'll say that one of the things I love about both of the Kill Bill films is that the characters are so fun and memorable. Esteban Vihaio is one of my favorite 'bad guys' of all time. Put him in the category of Angel Eyes... and he made that much of an impression with only about 5 minutes of screen time.

The time flew by while I watched it, I was so engrossed in the movie.  And I like the finale, I like its understatement.  And mostly I liked its emotional impact.

Oh, absolutely, I loved the last few scenes. I was never bored of the dialogue, I found it all fascinating. I loved Bill's story of Superman and Clark Kent in relation to Beatrix Kiddo and Arlene Plimpton.
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Clark Kent is how Superman views us. And what are the characteristics of Clark Kent? He's weak. He's unsure of himself. He's a coward. Clark Kent is Superman's critique on the whole human race.
Wow. Never thought of it that way. :o

Anyway, I liked these movies so much that I bought the DVDs for Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction... can't wait to watch them both again.

Doug, I'll be sure to get your favorite, Jackie Brown, next. :)
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Brendan
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« Reply #54 on: September 27, 2004, 08:42:24 PM »

But, does anyone know why Quentin Tarantino used different first names for this actor (Michael Parks)?



That's Michael Parks son, James Parks standing behind him. And his character name was "Edgar McGraw". ;) :D

Also Matt, do you realize who Michael Parks is? He's none other then the Outlaw Josey Wales himself!!
« Last Edit: September 27, 2004, 08:42:44 PM by Brendan » Logged
Matt
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« Reply #55 on: September 27, 2004, 08:44:08 PM »

Ahhhhh... now it's making sense!

mgk just told me tonight that Parks was Josey Wales in the sequel. I looked it up on the IMDb... it has a 1.1 rating.  :o  Yikes.

Okay, HERE we go:



Now I've got him. :) ;)
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Conan
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« Reply #56 on: September 28, 2004, 02:51:21 AM »

  That same actor is in the beginning of "From Dusk 'Till Dawn".  He plays a Texas Ranger or Sheriff-like character.  Gets blasted point blank in the head by Tarantino's character.
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Matt
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« Reply #57 on: September 28, 2004, 04:11:47 AM »

He has the same name, too. Earl McGraw.  ;D
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bdc28
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« Reply #58 on: September 28, 2004, 06:04:30 AM »

Chiming back in on this subject (Matt has that effect, I follow him around thread to thread like a lost puppy).

I dont believe that Tarantino calling his movie a 4th Tarantino movie is arrogant. Its a sign that all of these movies tie together in some way shape or form. Tarantino has a big thing about all his movies having some kind of "heritage", they are all family. For example.

THE VEGA BROTHERS: His first two movies are going to have main characters with the last name Vega, and of course they are going to be related.

BLACK SUITS: In RESERVOIR DOGS, PULP FICTION, and even FROM DUSK TILL DAWN, all of the alpha male lead aggressive people wear black suits.

RED APPLE CIGARETTES: In Reservoir Dogs, when Mr. Pink asks Mr. White for a cigarette, he pulls out a fictional brand of cigarettes called RED APPLE. In Pulp Fiction, Bruce Willis' character walks up to the bar and orders a pack of RED APPLES before his verbal show down with Vincent Vega. Also when seen in the airport in KILL BILL, Uma Thurman's character walks past a advertisement on the wall for RED APPLES.

EARL MCGRAW: Yep, same guy in both Kill Bill and FROM DUSK TILL DAWN. Obviously the timeline is reverse, but some of his characters he has a total love for.

There are also consistencies with his characters and the way he writes them. We had mentioned earlier the use of the "N word" by Dennis Hopper. But racial tensions are a consistent in alot of his movies. The heritage of Lucy Liu's character being brought into question by the Japanese mob in KILL BILL, and the N word also being used by Mr. Pink in RESERVOIR DOGS, as well as the drug dealer in PULP FICTION. There is also reference to it in FROM DUSK TILL DAWN from Seth Gecko, regarding latino. "Richie, these are not spic firecracker salesmen from Tiuana".

Also, consistent in alot of his movies are respect of the older movie genres. Aside from the obvious homage that he pays to every director he respects in KILL BILL by changing the way he directs each scene to another discipline (Kubrikian, Scorsese), there is also subtle ways. In KILL BILL, they mentioned "a Hatori Hanso sword"...Hatori Hanso was actually a hero character in some Kung Fu films, that was so popular he actually got a threequel from it. Now if you want to see homage, Hatori Hanso was played by Sonny Chiba in the movie, but also in TRUE ROMANCE, a DIFFERENT Sonny Chiba character was mentioned in the movie theater.

So in other words...ALL THESE MOVIES tie together.
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Matt
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« Reply #59 on: September 28, 2004, 04:32:13 PM »

BLACK SUITS: In RESERVOIR DOGS, PULP FICTION, and even FROM DUSK TILL DAWN, all of the alpha male lead aggressive people wear black suits.


So in other words...ALL THESE MOVIES tie together.

I read on the IMDb trivia board for Kill Bill Vol. 2 that:

Quote
Elle Driver wears the same outfit that Uma Thurman wears in Pulp Fiction (1994). It was also worn by Pam Grier in Jackie Brown (1997).


In fact, there's so many ways these movies all tie in together that it would be a major chore to list them all. Some of these are discussed HERE.  I think it's really cool.  8)
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