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Author Topic: Tag, you're it! #2 (Swell, another Eastwood game)  (Read 105652 times)
philo
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« Reply #200 on: January 23, 2003, 11:51:01 AM »


If I am not supposed to be tagging twice sonebody please tell me .


KC

The trailer for Two mules for Sister Sara claims "The most action packed Clint Eastwood film ever made". At that time agree or disagree ?


Matt

We all know that the marketing for The Beguiled was one of the worst in Eastwood history . What would you have as the tag line on the poster for a 2004 restoration re-release ?


Philo .
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Conan
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« Reply #201 on: January 23, 2003, 12:36:40 PM »

A couple of questions ....

Conan

Tom Nowak's story continues , how would you do this ?


  I've always thought I'd at least be an average actor, but one thing I know for sure is that I'd be a terrible screenwriter.  But I'll try, I'm going to be vague since I could go on forever with specifics (dialogue, camera angles/pans, etc...)  Five years after the first "Pink Cadillac", Nowak is vacationing in Malaysia; dragged there by his current girlfriend kicking and screaming.  The Neo-Nazis that Nowak confronted in "Pink Cadillac" have a splinter group in Europe - they waited for him to leave the United States to make their move.  They track him down while he's visiting the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur.  A group of Neo-Nazi thugs grab him and his girlfriend as they are leaving the towers, throw them in a van, and take off....Then the rest of this lame actioner ensues :)

  I over tagged by three or four yesterday, so I won't tag anyone.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2003, 12:37:18 PM by Conan » Logged

philo
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« Reply #202 on: January 23, 2003, 12:57:37 PM »


Sounds good to me .

It was the worst film of that holiday season , so much so that we were not given the chance to see it on the big screen here in the UK .

I have seen worst sequels than Conan's idea made .


Philo .
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« Reply #203 on: January 23, 2003, 01:53:43 PM »

First off, I'd argue that the serial killer thriller genre is completely played out. Ever since Seven, these films have been growing increasingly ridiculous, with the killer inventing more and more elaborate ways to torture his victims and mess with the police (a trend that's satirized in the recent film Adaptation).

This flaw is also readily apparent in Blood Work. I didn't believe for a second that Jeff Daniels, an apparently laid-back beach bum who enjoyed drinking brewskies, was also a demented serial killer who had been cagily outwitting Eastwood's character for years. Perhaps a more accomplished actor could have pulled this transformation off, but it would probably have been difficult for anyone (though Daniels didn't help the cause).

As for the DeJesus-Eastwood romance, I've already stated my feelings that it was lame and detracted from the film. Perhaps a more interesting angle would have been for DeJesus to seduce Eastwood as a means of convincing him to track down her sister's killer. After the killer was disposed of, she could have then dropped the Eastwood character, giving the film a darker shading more in step with the noirish feel Eastwood seemed to be trying to accomplish.

The Rodriguez character is the latest in a troubling trend that's been plaguing Eastwood's more recent efforts: an over-the-top, hammy performance that plagues every scene he or she is in. Perhaps Eastwood thought the contrast of Rodriguez' hyperactive personality and his laid-back cool would make for an interesting contrast. At any rate, it's a major misstep.

Here's some food for thought: In the film, Rodriguez vaguely hints that Eastwood's character used to hog the limelight. This is a fascinating angle that should have been explored for a ton of reasons. Let's say Eastwood's character IS an ass, he loves the attention, maybe he was pandering to the press when he should have been spending more time searching for the serial killer, and Rodriguez -- who was busting his ass on the case -- resented it. Now the Eastwood characterization has been deepened a little, and the script has suggested a real reason for the rift with Rodriguez. Instead of cartoonish rantings, maybe his character has a legitimate beef with Eastwood's. It's just an idea, and it's far from fully realized, but it still seems like an improvement...

In my opinion, in the last five years Eastwood has done a generally poor job of selecting scripts to direct. He seems to be focusing solely on scripts that he feels have a strong character that he can play. In theory, that's fine. The problem, though, is that in concentrating on character he's selected scripts that are often cliched in terms of plot and trapped within genre limitations. If he's going to focus on character studies (which I think is a great direction at this point in his career), he should focus on stories that don't really fit into any genre ("White Hunter, Black Heart") or defy genre expectations ("Unforgiven," "A Perfect World").

Ironically, however, I actually felt the Eastwood character in Blood Work was underwritten. He doesn't really have any flaws, and I don't get enough of a sense of his daily routine and how his heart problems affect it. There's a great scene in Absolute Power when Eastwood's character sets alone and eats dinner. Although brief, it speaks volumes about his character. Scenes like this seem to be missing from Blood Work.

I guess, then, that I really don't think that the film could have been saved unless it was significantly rewritten (I haven't read the book). Ever since Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil, it seems like Eastwood's been playing it safe. I'm hoping Mystic River marks a return to the more uncompromising Eastwood that marked him as my favorite filmmaker.

MC, it's really great to have you back! Welcome back man! I'd really have to say that I agree with nearly everything that you said there. I'd argue that you're correct about the serial killer genre, but that it could have still really worked. There are conventions of the genre, and it is a bit played out, but with a good cast and a good script, it could have still been really good, and Clint hasn't really done a real psychological thriller in that vein. The closest to that was In the Line of Fire , and that film was very good. Part of the problem as I see it is the complete lack of that torture, that sinister attitude, that relationship with the hunter and the hunted. It wasn't there. The cat and mouse game was implied, but it wasn't even shown. As we saw in In the Line of Fire , if that kind of thing is done effectively, it can really work, and it wasn't done effectively. Not only was Daniels a very poor choice for the killer, in my opinion, but his whole character was completely underwritten. There wasn't any development to this guy. There wasn't any development with any of the characters in that movie, and that was one of the major problems with it.  

The Rodriguez character was absolutely terrible. I don't know if your suggestion would have improved things, but it would have given Eastwood a more complex character, and if Rodriguez was played more as a serious investigator with legitimate reasons for his feelings towards McCaleb, I think that would have definitely played better. As it stands, that entire character portrayal was completely inaproppriate, and detracted from the film every time he was on the screen. His character lacked legitimacy.

As far as his choices recently, again I agree with you. I've said the same thing myself a few times before. Eastwood has been trying to find interesting characters to play, and I think for the most part he's succeeded, but he's capable of so much more. If Blood Work would have been up to the caliber of an Absolute Power or True Crime I still would have been happy though. I think another problem is that I'd really love to see him work with some really big name actors, and see how he plays off of them. I think that could be really interesting, and I bet there are tons of actors that would work with him if he asked. Anthony Hopkins in particular said he would love to work with Clint! How cool would that be? Where's the film for that? I want to see that film! Clint Eastwood and Anthony Hopkins! WOW!
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« Reply #204 on: January 23, 2003, 02:06:42 PM »


AKA: What's the worst promoted Eastwood film (including trailer) of the last 10 years, and why? How would you have improved the film's promotion, advertising, etc.?

This may seem difficult, but I think the answer is quite simple: True Crime . Now, to be fair, ten years ago I was only 8 or 9 years old, so I think it would be fair to say that I wasn't really paying attention to the advertising (or lack thereof) for Eastwood films. If you asked me about the advertising for Unforgiven I wouldn't have a clue, because I don't even remember one single advertisement for that film. I think several of Eastwood's films of late have been marketed poorly. Apart from Space Cowboys , and perhaps Blood Work (I don't know because I wasn't here) all of his films have not been marketed spectacularly. I do remember True Crime , and I think that was really done poorly. I remember seeing a commercial during the Superbowl about it, but other than that, I don't really remember any kind of sustained advertising campaign for the film. I remember seeing the trailer in the theater, and that was it. Not only was there little or no promotion of the film, but I think the film was marketed wrong. The trailer for True Crime marketed the film wrong. It made it seem like this was going to be a really action packed, suspenseful and tense race against the clock Eastwood thriller. That wasn't what True Crime was about. I would have actually done advertising for the film, had television commercials, had a teaser trailer so people knew that True Crime was coming up (like most films do, but most Eastwood films don't) and devised a better trailer that really sold the good points about the film, and even though it may have been less exciting, it would have been more faithful to the film. For most people, I don't think that trailer would have gotten people into the seats. I think people going into True Crime were expecting something totally different than what was on the screen. The film shown was not the same film advertised.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2003, 02:07:12 PM by AKA23 » Logged
Brendan
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« Reply #205 on: January 23, 2003, 02:09:59 PM »

I agree with ya there AKA23. I remember watching the trailer on the DVD, and when it was done, I was like, 'what the frick was that?, thats not True Crime.'
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mgk
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« Reply #206 on: January 23, 2003, 03:04:30 PM »

 :)
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From Philo:  Now I am not sure if MGK has made a mistake or is having a bit of fun with me ,

Actually, I just meant that Eastwood's only Oscar for directing was for Unforgiven so what would you choose as another movie that he should have gotten an Oscar for...I really wasn't pulling your leg...at least, not on purpose. ;D

Quote
MGK

From Philo: What is your favourite photo image from Tightrope ?

Here are two of my favorite images from Tightrope.
I like the photograph of Beryl offering her hands up for Wes to handcuff because of the obvious insinuations ;) but I also like what she is telling him...which, in my opinion,  is "I trust you."

Of course, I like the other photo because it has all of Wes' "family" members and shows the love that exists in their "family."



Tagging.....

bdc: What is your favorite movie from each decade Clint has been making films?  (You can skip the 1950s if you would like to.)

D'Amb:  Is there any quote from an Eastwood movie that you like to use occasionally with your friends?

mgk
« Last Edit: January 23, 2003, 03:06:02 PM by mgk » Logged
MC
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« Reply #207 on: January 23, 2003, 03:44:06 PM »

This may seem difficult, but I think the answer is quite simple: True Crime . Now, to be fair, ten years ago I was only 8 or 9 years old, so I think it would be fair to say that I wasn't really paying attention to the advertising (or lack thereof) for Eastwood films. If you asked me about the advertising for Unforgiven I wouldn't have a clue, because I don't even remember one single advertisement for that film. I think several of Eastwood's films of late have been marketed poorly. Apart from Space Cowboys , and perhaps Blood Work (I don't know because I wasn't here) all of his films have not been marketed spectacularly. I do remember True Crime , and I think that was really done poorly. I remember seeing a commercial during the Superbowl about it, but other than that, I don't really remember any kind of sustained advertising campaign for the film. I remember seeing the trailer in the theater, and that was it. Not only was there little or no promotion of the film, but I think the film was marketed wrong. The trailer for True Crime marketed the film wrong. It made it seem like this was going to be a really action packed, suspenseful and tense race against the clock Eastwood thriller. That wasn't what True Crime was about. I would have actually done advertising for the film, had television commercials, had a teaser trailer so people knew that True Crime was coming up (like most films do, but most Eastwood films don't) and devised a better trailer that really sold the good points about the film, and even though it may have been less exciting, it would have been more faithful to the film. For most people, I don't think that trailer would have gotten people into the seats. I think people going into True Crime were expecting something totally different than what was on the screen. The film shown was not the same film advertised.

Great comments on both Blood Work and True Crime. As I've mentioned before, True Crime is not one of my favorites, but I'd add the following regarding the film's miserable promotional campaign:

1) The print ads were terrible. The lead quote was, "A true potboiler." Wow! What a ringing endorsement! That's the worst lead quote I've seen in a movie print ad, ever. Not only is it painfully boring, but "potboiler" isn't even a complimentary term. Brutal.

2) I think they missed a huge opportunity in failing to champion Isaiah Washington's performance. Washington, a veteran of numerous Spike Lee films, gave a brilliant performance that was universally acclaimed. A little creative thinking might have really expanded the film's audience. But instead his performance was completely ignored (James Woods was the only other costar mentioned in the print ads).

I remember reading an interview with Washington before the film came out, and he was saying that the film was really going to shake people up with what it had to say about the death penalty. Instead, we were told that it was a "real potboiler." Zzzzzzzzz...
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Daisy Abigael
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« Reply #208 on: January 23, 2003, 05:44:44 PM »

Loved your answer to my Where Eagles Dare question. Let's say you had a chance to play a part in Tightrope. Would you rather be Beryl ... or Sarita?

Hmm...  I'd have to plump for Beryl - (although I'd change my name by Deed Poll! ;D) - but I'd invest in some fur-lined handcuffs! :o

From Nighty:
Quote
If you got choosen for the next Bio-Dome project and could only take three Eastwood DVD's with you, which ones would they be?

Well I'd have to get a DVD player first... :-[

But I know what you're saying. :)

Three makes it easy really - rather thn say six or seven how would I choose?  I'd stick to the classics.

A Fistful of Dollars
His first starring role.  The grounding of the Eastwood legend.  The start of everything.

Dirty Harry
The mature Eastwood at the peak of his fame and power. Don Siegel's masterpiece.  A truly great thriller.

Where Eagles Dare
Still more fun than most films I care to think about.  A great girl's own adventure.  And for the sheer nostalgia - my first Clint movie up there on the big screen, four years old... 8)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2003, 05:58:59 PM by Daisy Abigael » Logged

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« Reply #209 on: January 23, 2003, 07:29:10 PM »

To answer Agents' question about a choice between allot of money for a job or a chance to maybe co-star in an Eastwood movie I would have to take the big paycheck instead of the fame since I am too not into Hollywood that much.  :-\
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« Reply #210 on: January 23, 2003, 08:42:17 PM »

Quote
Quote from: Matt on January 22, 2003, 07:32:59 AM    
Tagging:  

LITTLE BILL:  What's your favorite line in Unforgiven?

i'd have to say it's the

Quote
it's a terrible thing to kill a man,
takin away everything he ever had, and everything he ever will

forgive me if it's not 100%
thats the best that i can remember

That's the gist of it ... it's actually
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It's a hell of a thing, killin' a man. You take away all he's got, and all he's ever gonna have.

You'll find a RealAudio file on p. 5 of the "Audio Clips" section of this site!  :D
« Last Edit: January 23, 2003, 09:09:36 PM by KC » Logged
Doug
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« Reply #211 on: January 23, 2003, 09:15:59 PM »


Doug : Which Clint movie you watch and feel same emotion,don't matter how many times you watch it?

Well, there's a few I've only seen twice, so they don't count.  I might say Honkytonk Man, as I remember when that first came on HBO I watched it about six times that month and was always engrossed.  (Can you believe I haven't seen it since. :-[)  But the easy choice could be Unforgiven.   Of course, I haven't seen it as many times as say Dirty Harry, so it's a bit understandable that I've seen Dirty Harry one or twice when I really wasn't in the right mood for it.  As for Unforgiven my appreaciation and understanding has grown, but the basic emotional response is the same each time I see it.  Usually my emotional response to any of his movies stays the same over time, but occassionally I watch a movie in the wrong mood, and I find myself nitpicking it to death rather than enjoying it.   Good question.


Doug: If Clint decided to continue directing, but act in only one more film, in which genre would you like that film to be?

One last acting role...  I think I'd like to see him in a non-genre movie actually, one that allows him to give a broad performance, and who knows, maybe get another acting nomination.  He's shown he can do the complicated, troubled artist (Honkeytonk Man, White Hunter Black Heart) so maybe he could be play the aging pianist, dealing with ...  Well, something like that.  Or else maybe a suspense movie, the way suspense movies used to be made.  He could be that aging pianist in Europe, and he sees a man murder someone and now he's being stalked by the murderer...  But something clever, well-written, with good depth... something marketed as a drama with the suspense as only part of the story.  It could even have a finale where Clint can be Clint ... for one last time.  :'(

Doug Replace Tyne Daly's character in "The Enforcer" with another actress.

Just for nightwing, I got Julie Newmar.  Wouldn't that have been interesting.  Dirty Harry teams up with Catwoman!  Actually, she probably could have pulled it off.  Uhh, or something like that. :)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2003, 01:59:27 AM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #212 on: January 23, 2003, 10:02:30 PM »

Okay, I thought up the five questions I owe...

daisy Which Clint movie have you seen that surprised you the most, in terms of being better than you'd expected?

mgk  If Steven Spielberg had directed The Bridges of Madison County, what do you think the biggest difference in his version of the movie would have been?

AKA  You're required to write an essay on one Clint movie of someone else's choice.  Which movie do you hope you don't have to write about because it would be the hardest to analyze, even though you like the particular movie?

Lilly You go to a dinner party and who are seated next to but Dina Eastwood ... what would be the one question you would most want to ask her about Clint?

Holden I asked this question of Lucas, but he never posted the answer he sent to me.  So it'd be interesting to see what your response would be.   Let's say some John Wayne western had never been made and the script was still floating around in the 1970's or even in the '80's, 90's, or today (you aren't limited by that) and Clint has the rights to it and wants to direct and star in it, with the option of rewriting it to his particular tastes....  So which one do you think Clint could have most made his own and done it so it was at least equal if not better than the original movie?  If you don't like the john wayne part of the question, you can change it to another Classic western.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2003, 10:05:43 PM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #213 on: January 23, 2003, 10:23:05 PM »

Just two pretty easy tags for me today!


KC.... Unforgiven is never made.. Instead Clint goes ahead with plans to make Pink Cadillac 2. Thereafter his career course remains the same. Do you still end up being such a great admirer of his work ?
Well, in the first place ... if Clint had made Pink Cadillac 2 instead of Unforgiven, I don't see any way his career course could have remained the same ... I think he'd have been lucky to have ever found work as an actor again, let alone as a director (I'm assuming you're projecting Clint as the director of this project, or did you visualize Buddy Van Horn doing an encore as helmer?).  In fact, he probably could count himself lucky if the men in white coats hadn't turned up shortly after the premiere to take him away somewhere where he could never harm a studio's treasury again ...  :o

BUT, if in some alternate universe Clint's 1992 release had been Pink Cadillac 2 ...  ::) and it was a big hit ...  :o and all the others had followed, just as they have in the reality we all know and love ... I seriously doubt I'd have ever gone to see an Eastwood film to this day, unless I'd somehow independently have developed an interest in Siegel or Leone. Can't think of a single one of the post-92 flicks, much as I dearly love many of them now that I've seen 'em, that has an intrinsic "hook" that could have pulled me into the theater.


KC

The trailer for Two Mules for Sister Sara claims "The most action packed Clint Eastwood film ever made". At that time agree or disagree ?
I'd disagree. Two Mules was released in June, 1970. The main "action" is concentrated in about fifteen minutes at the end ... it's a very swift-moving, virtuosically edited sequence, but aside from it and maybe the scene in the beginning in which Hogan rescues Sara from the bandidos, there's not much action in the film. A lot of "operations," maybe, but not much action. At that point in Clint's career, I'd say it had five pretty good competitors in the "action" department: the three Leone films, Where Eagles Dare ... and Kelly's Heroes (released virtually simultaneously with Two Mules).


I tagged one too many yesterday, so I'll just post two new ones for these.

MC: On the old Board, you posted an interview with David Webb Peoples about Unforgiven. Do you think this is the best script Eastwood has ever worked from, and if not, what is?
Doug: What is your favorite "moment of silence" (as opposed to a line of dialogue) in an Eastwood film?
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« Reply #214 on: January 23, 2003, 10:43:23 PM »

Right, I'm gonna get caught up...

KC asked:
Quote
Since you haven't seen all of Eastwood's films yet, is there one (or more) you're putting off because you don't think you'll enjoy it? Conversely, are there any you're "saving" because you expect them to be really good and you want to "defer the pleasure"?
 There isn't a film that I'm consciously putting off watching because I don't think I'll enjoy it.  However, I do sometimes savour the thought of watching what I expect to be a really good Clint film, and put it off, as you put it "to defer the pleasure".  I particularly did that with Bridges.  I wanted to be in the right mood, and also to watch it without being interrupted.  I have to watch movies on a communal TV in our uni. common room, and it's difficult to watch TV without people coming in and talking over it.  So when I watched Bridges I did so at 4am, thinking I'd be left in peace.  Unfortunately one of my house mates came back drunk right at the scene where they are having their last supper together. >:(  This is part of the reason that I haven't seen Unforgiven yet - I know!  :o  ::)  I have been putting that off to enjoy it, but I've kind of given up doing that now because being on the board I keep finding out things about movies that I'd rather not have known before watching them.  So now I'm just gonna try and watch everything soon, but then it'll be a shame to have no new movies to look forward to :(.  Having said that, I find that a lot get better with watching.

Gant asked:
Quote
Streep is unavailable for Bridges. Who do you cast in her role instead.
 ???That's really hard, because Bridges is Clint and Streep, and it's almost sacrilegeous to think of replacing her.  Like I said before I'm not that knowlegeable when it comes to actors/actresses, but if I had to choose one I might go for Debra Winger.  That choice would be purely on the strength of her brilliant and moving performance opposite Anthony Hopkins in Shadowlands.  



BTW I totally agree with Aka's thoughts:
Quote
Anthony Hopkins in particular said he would love to work with Clint! How cool would that be? Where's the film for that? I want to see that film! Clint Eastwood and Anthony Hopkins! WOW!
That really would be a class combination.

mgk asked
Quote
Which Eastwood movie do you think has the most beautiful scenery
I think I have to go for The Outlaw Josey Wales.  I'm especially thinking of the spectacular Paria River valley in Utah:


(Check out American West Travelogue page from which I got the photo, and which talks about the movie set).  Anyone can see how beautiful it is, but as a geologist I find it particularly appealing; all that bare rock gets me excited! ;D 8)
I also loved the autumn colours in the film, especially the shimmering leaves on the trees at the new farmstead.  Autumn is my favourite season, and it's long been an ambition of mine to camp out in the Wild West as the Fall takes hold.  

Here are two of the tags I owe, more to follow...

Palm: If you were in charge of producing a Bridges of Madison County special edition DVD, what would you like to put on it?

[shadow=red,left,300]mgk:[/shadow] I know you have your own answer for the question you asked me, so I'd like to know which Eastwood movie you think has the most beautiful scenery.  
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« Reply #215 on: January 23, 2003, 11:19:09 PM »


Matt:  What do you think the message or messages are in Eastwood's A Perfect World?  What do you think Eastwood wanted us to take away from the film after viewing it?


I believe the main message in the film is about fatherhood and the responsibility of fatherhood... the effect that fathers have on their children's lives... and how very rare it is for a man to be a good father.  

I'll list several fathers and father figures in this film, and sadly, all of them fail in some way:

Butch's father:  Abused Butch and his mom, abandoned them.

Philip's father:  Abandoned him.

Cleve's father:  We don't know... but he's not around.  Either abandoned or dead.

Red Garnett:  Almost a father figure to Butch, he tried to help him by getting him sent to four years in Juvenile Detention to escape his father's upbringing, but failed miserably when it turned him into a criminal.  Again he tries to help him all these years later, telling the men in their trailer not to shoot if they get a clear shot, and again at the end of the film when he says not to shoot unless he gives the signal.   Butch is shot regardless.  Red failed him again.

JFK:  Father figure to our country, about to be killed which will leave a wounded and lost country in his absence.

God:  Philip's mother is a Jehovah Witness, God is the ultimate father figure.  But being faithful to Him with their religion only makes Philip and his siblings a laughing stock of the neighborhood and they aren't able to participate in "fun" things.  

Bob:  The family man, the only man in the film who is with his family, but he's not a "tough" man.. He allows his wife to yell at the kids, and allows Butch to boss him around.  He protects his family, but at the same time, fails at being a "man".  Can a "real man" be a good father?

Butch Haines:  Becomes a father figure to Philip.  He tries to save Philip from the childhood he had and a father that wasn't worth a damn, and yet by involving Philip in his actions, he will leave an indelible scar on Philip that could be as bad as his father left on him.

The US Federal Government:   Another father figure in the film, a figure of authority of our country.  It failed when the FBI man mistakenly thought Butch was armed and kills him, and years before it failed when it oversentenced Butch when he was only a teenager.

Cleve's grandfather:  He loves Cleve, and yet he can hit him and verbally abuse him without a thought.  

Aside from showing failing father relationships, there's a parallel throughout the movie of Philip being a young version of Butch:   Butch killed a man when he was 8, Philip was 8 when he would shoot Butch, ultimately leading to his demise; and both were abandoned by their father.   Philip said his father would be back.... Butch's father promised they'd get together in Alaska.  They both share a hope and a need for a father, as well as a love and a hatred for the same father that failed them.

What does Eastwood want us to take away from watching this film?  Hopefully something positive... that fathers have an enormous responsibility to their children and to take it very seriously.  I hope that's the message, I like to think there could be something positive in there. :)    There's a quote in the movie Spiderman:  "With great power comes great responsibility"  that actually sums it up pretty well too.

Matt

We all know that the marketing for The Beguiled was one of the worst in Eastwood history . What would you have as the tag line on the poster for a 2004 restoration re-release ?


Hmmm... something new, huh?  How about:

Got Mushrooms?  

Just kidding.  (Are those "Got Milk" ads popular over in England?)

Okay it isn't easy to come up with an ad campaign for a movie, but I'll give it a shot.

How about:  

For Corporal McBurney, the War began when he left the battlefield.

I'm sure someone can do better than that.  Anyone got any ideas?

I owe three tags... coming up.  :D
« Last Edit: January 24, 2003, 01:37:41 AM by Matt » Logged
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« Reply #216 on: January 23, 2003, 11:35:07 PM »

Matt, that's a beautiful essay on A Perfect World.  :D

Thanks so much for sharing that with us!

KC
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« Reply #217 on: January 23, 2003, 11:36:30 PM »

Thanks.  I was hoping to get all those typos fixed up before you read it though.  ;D
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« Reply #218 on: January 23, 2003, 11:57:29 PM »

Here are some of the tags I owe, more coming.
KC: I don't know your taste in music, so I'd like to know: if Clint was going to use a film to promote one kind of music other than jazz/blues, what would you like it to be?  Any particular song(s)/artist(s)?

Matt: You didn't post in the "Eastwood movie music" thread, so I'd like to know your favourite piece of music from any Clint film, for the music itself, rather than how it compliments the film.  

Xichado: I loved your question to mgk regarding that great line by Zelda Fitzgerald.  I'd like to know which other poet you would like to see included in an Eastwood film (maybe by just using lines from his/her peoms, or perhaps by using a script about his/her life).  
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« Reply #219 on: January 24, 2003, 12:14:40 AM »


Matt: You didn't post in the "Eastwood movie music" thread, so I'd like to know your favourite piece of music from any Clint film, for the music itself, rather than how it compliments the film.  

Well, the only hard part about this question is narrowing down WHICH song in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly is my favorite, or that compliments the film the best.  The main title is great... it's such a pick me up through the film.  Whenever it plays you sit a little closer to the edge of your seat, and you can feel your adrenaline rushing.   I really love that one.   Another piece that I love and which is so beautiful in the film has the opposite effect... it is sad, touching, and just makes you feel melancholy at a very emotional point in the film... that would be "The Story of a Soldier" and it's what the soldiers play when they're ordered to perform while Tuco is being beaten.

I watched a special on Leone and Quentin Tarantino said that he didn't think there was ever a composer and director that complemented each other better than Ennio Morricone and Sergio Leone.  I haven't seen as many films as Quentin, but from what I've seen, I agree.  I love the soundtracks to all the Leone westerns that I've seen... they add a whole emotional element to the films that wouldn't be there with any other composer.  The music has a life of its own, and those soundtracks even without the film conjur up all those emotions in me when I listen to it.  

I did mean to post in that thread, but I wanted to get that tape and find Quentin's exact quote on Ennio and Sergio... I just never got around to it.  :-[

EDITED TO ADD:

Geez, do you think I'll ever read a question properly?  I just re-read this post and noticed you didn't want to know what pieces complemented the films the best, rather what piece I liked the best.  Well, the answer still stands because the GBU soundtrack and those songs are my favorite songs to listen to without the movie.  If I had to go with a song that had vocals as well, (other than "Go Go Go Manco!" ;) ) I'd go with Why Should I Care" from True Crime.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2003, 12:17:06 AM by Matt » Logged
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