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Author Topic: The Dollars trilogy, Mondo version  (Read 1622 times)
Matt
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« on: January 26, 2016, 12:17:47 PM »

I found the Mondo version of the Dollars trilogy, the Italian restoration. I've so far only watched Fistful, but it was beautiful. Anyone else have this?
« Last Edit: January 27, 2016, 01:38:47 AM by Matt » Logged
B.C.
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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2016, 02:22:32 PM »

I have the Mondo version of the three. I've so far only watched Fistful (I get to watch the rest this week and next!) Beautiful.

"Mondo?"  ???
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Charlie
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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2016, 03:03:47 PM »

"Mondo?"  ???

Yeah Mondo?  It that the italian bluray?
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Matt
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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2016, 03:18:10 PM »

Here's a thread that talks about the Mondo releases -- but not much to be found about Fistful. Collectors track it down, and you can find some with English tracks (mine have them).

http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=123255

There's a little info here too:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=11528.0

Here's a comparison of the MGM release vs. the Mondo release. In each of the sets, I'll post the Mondo version first, the MGM second.





















Major differences to color, and the contrasts are pushed in the Mondo version. Both versions are awesome.
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Matt
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2016, 03:19:24 PM »

I should mention that these caps are from my computer off of VLC. The Mondo looks awesome on the 50" TV. It may look a bit too pushed in these caps, not so really on the big screen.

(And of course this is Fistful. I'm not pulling out the GBU until next week. ;))
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Matt
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2016, 03:29:40 PM »

Note from my first link above (forum.blu-ray.com) this post from BaseGR:

Quote
The video on the MGM version, is with exception of the framing, in no way superior to the Italian version. If you prefer an accurate representation of the film, the Mondo disc is the way to go.

For the Italian blu-ray, a new master (about a year and a half ago) was created by the Cinetecca Bologna, using the original negatives. Some intensive colour correction and damage removal was used to restore the print as close to the way it originally looked. What remains as the final product, is an optically soft, yet pleasing film-like image with accurate colours and a fine layer of grain. There is however a slight boost in the contrast.

The MGM blu-ray is an entirely different story. It is quite clear that this release makes use of a master created by MGM in 2004, for the release of the Special Edition DVD in 2005. This particular master (although created from a relatively good source) exhibits a strong degree of sharpening, rendering the picture artificially 'sharp' - also strengthening the visibility of grain. In terms of colour this master is quite similar to the masters used for the release of 'A Fistful of Dollars' and ' The Good, The Bad and the Ugly'. The MGM release of these films were characterized by a rather desaturated/cold look in comparison to other releases worldwide. The blu-ray replicates this look. About 20 seconds of FaFDM still remain cut.

I have compared these discs side-by-side and my fears regarding the MGM version were confirmed. The disc has a consistently artificially sharpened look throughout the film. This might be pleasing to some, as more detail seems to be present - but this is definitely not the case. In fact, as an experiment, I popped in my Italian blu-ray and turned the sharpening on my TV-set up to about 80%. Not surprisingly, the Mondo release suddenly looked almost identical to the MGM release.

And this is a really good page about it:

A Fistful of Dollars (aka 'Per un pugno di dollari') [Blu-ray]
« Last Edit: January 26, 2016, 04:12:15 PM by Matt » Logged
Matt
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2016, 04:01:37 PM »

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A Fistful of Dollars (1964)

Bob Robertson [Sergio Leone]; subject [not credited]: Victor Andres Catena, St. Leo; script [not credited]: V.A. Chain, Jaime Comas [Jaime Comas Gil], Fernando Di Leo, S. Leone, Duccio Tessari; director of photography: Jack Dalmas [Massimo Dallamano]; Music: Leo Nichols [Ennio Morricone]; Mounting: Bob Quintle [Roberto Cinquini]; Cast: Clint Eastwood, John Wells [Gian Maria Volonte], Marianne Koch, Wolfgang Lukschy, Sieghardt Rupp, Joe [Joseph] Egger; Origin: Italy / Spain / West Germany; production: Jolly Film, Ocean Films, Constantin Film; duration: 97 '.
"A lone gunman (Clint Eastwood) arrives in a small town on the border between the US and Mexico where Rojo and Baxter vie for control of the liquor traffic and weapons. With a trick the alien fails to do so the two families do kill each other "(http://www.rhv.it/ripleysfilm/).

For a Fistful of Dollars was presented at the Venice Film Festival 2007 in the version restored by the National Film Archive and Ripley's Film, in collaboration with Unidis Jolly Movies and Sky Italy; processing entirely in digital were made at Digital Filmlab Copenhagen.

The restoration of the film made it possible to reintegrate in a new negative scene lost materials in circulation in Italy, with a close-up of Joe (Clint Eastwood), luckily escaped from the hands of bandits, as he watches Ramon (Gian Maria Volonte) and his men averted from the hapless owner of the saloon (José Calvo), suspected of helping him.

The restoration was carried out - after two years of testing - with cutting-edge digital technologies in 2K resolution, using for the first time films (Digital Intermediate Fuji 8511 RDI and Positive Fuji XD 3521 - Extended Density), specially designed to reproduce colors original copies and guarantee a perfect image resolution. The most complex were those of the restoration of the original negative: subsequent reprints have in fact resulted in a heavy wear, and therefore one could say that the success of the film has put at risk the survival! The format now obsolete when it was filmed for A Fistful of Dollars, (the Techniscope, with a panoramic frame half the size of normal 35mm), required particularly complex work, ensuring in particular the color rendering of images. As for the restoration of the frescoes or the paintings, he proceeded to the "detachment" of digital images of 14,453 frames of the negative (the '' original 'of that particular work of art that is the film), cleaning and repairing the patina damage, restaurandole and transferring them to a new negative polyester that will keep intact over time the original beauty and spectacle, and will make subsequent copies of the film faithful to the original.

The loss of the magnetic sound of the original Italian version, was forced to start from a negative column worn out by the reissues that, to allow the public to be able to again enjoy the wonderful soundtrack of Ennio Morricone and the original mix, it has been integrated with two set of magnetic columns prepared for the overseas edition of the original stereo and the music made by RCA kept in Germany. The restoration of sound, made entirely digital in Paris by Italian and French technicians at the lab Le Diapason, required a real reconstruction, scene by scene, the sound of the film, which was re-edited and equalized, after being clean and it restored in nearly three months of work of two editors and two sound engineers.

Translated from Italian using Google Translate. Article (in Italian) here:

http://www.fondazionecsc.it/news.jsp?ID_NEWS=126&areaNews=10&GTemplate=news.jsp
« Last Edit: January 26, 2016, 04:14:35 PM by Matt » Logged
Doug
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2016, 04:17:05 PM »

I have the Mondo version of the three. I've so far only watched Fistful (I get to watch the rest this week and next!) Beautiful.

Aren't those only in Italian?

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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2016, 04:20:44 PM »

« Last Edit: January 26, 2016, 04:23:35 PM by Matt » Logged
Doug
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« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2016, 04:22:48 PM »

$85!? Yeah, I'll be sticking with the DVD for now.
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Matt
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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2016, 01:44:28 AM »

This is at the end of the movie:

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Matt
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« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2016, 01:46:51 AM »

This is fun -- I Googled that, and found this very informative article:

Clint Eastwood Classic "A Fistful of Dollars" Restored With da Vinci Systems

And just in case that link should ever disappear from the internet, here's the full article:
Quote
(CORAL SPRINGS, Fla. - Sept. 7, 2007) When the definitive spaghetti western "A Fistful of Dollars" is released on DVD, star Clint Eastwood will look as unblemished as he did in the film's 1964 premiere, thanks to da Vinci's Resolve® digital mastering suite and Revival™ image restoration system deployed by Digital Film Lab (DFL) in Copenhagen, Denmark.


DFL Head of Restoration Bet Schwenn deployed both the da Vinci Resolve and Revival systems to restore Sergio Leone's classic western. To begin the workflow, DFL colorists scanned the original 2-perf camera negative to storage with Thomson's Grass Valley Spirit 4K scanner and then leveraged the da Vinci Resolve RT system for easy nonlinear access to the stored frames. With capabilities to access digital images directly without file transfer, the Resolve and Revival systems performed the restoration processes simultaneously, shortening the time required to complete the many detailed tasks associated with film restoration.

"Love of cinema is a prerequisite for embarking on this kind of work," said Kris Kolodziejski, CEO of Digital Film Lab. "Having the chance to bring to life one of the great films in the history of cinema has been a thrill for the team here at Digital Film Lab. Frankly, without tools as exacting and precise as da Vinci's Resolve and Revival, we never could have achieved the beautiful result we did -- we like to call it 'ultracolor'!"

Using the movie's original trailer as a reference, DFL Colorist Jorgen Christiansen recreated the look of the original Technicolor print using Resolve RT's powerful features, including multiple PowerWindows™ with Object Tracking, unlimited secondary corrections, and the ability to pull select nodes from still references.

Five DFL team members led by Senior Operator Claus Greffel used two da Vinci Revival systems for cleanup and repair. The team created a batch queue for a number of automated processes, including corrections for warped images, scratches, dust particles, and dropped pixels. The fine details of many scenes in "Fistful of Dollars," however, required that dirt and dust removal be made manually as well, frame-by-frame, using Revival’s interactive mode rather than the automated mode.

Flicker shifts between color channels posed a particular challenge, a problem common to many older color films. Greffel was impressed that with just a click of a button, Revival was able to remove yellow spots from the blue channel entirely. Revival's high-speed processing hardware, including the deFlicker tool, smoothed out the blue, red, and green channels independently, providing a solid level and color balance. Once the film was re-recorded, the final HD version for digital projection and future HD-DVD release was transferred onto a Sony HDSR 4:4:4 deck.

"Resolve plays a key role in remastering projects, assuring top quality results while reducing the time and cost associated with restoration," said Bill Robertson, vice president and general manager of da Vinci Systems. "Revival's sophisticated set of restoration tools does the job accurately, speedily, and efficiently. With the Revival and Resolve systems working in tandem, significant and beloved films like 'A Fistful of Dollars' can be economically restored through a highly efficient workflow, thus preserving a valuable part of cinematic history."

For more information on the Resolve digital mastering suite and the Revival image restoration system, visit http://www.davsys.com
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