News: See SULLY, starring Tom Hanks, now streaming and on DVD and Blu-ray!


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Who saw Sully? Members' Comments (WARNING: SPOILERS ALLOWED!)  (Read 2220 times)
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24386


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« on: September 04, 2016, 12:58:00 AM »

With Sully opening this week. It's time to get our traditional "members' comments" threads started.

In this thread, spoilers are allowed. Anyone who has seen Sully and has more to say than can be safely posted in the "No Spoilers" thread, please give us your thoughts, comments or full-fledged review.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 30924


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2016, 12:59:47 AM »

SPOILER!!!!!

Psssst ... all the passengers survive! ;)
Logged
Dan Dassow
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 935



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2016, 02:49:15 AM »

SPOILER!!!!!

Psssst ... all the passengers survive! ;)
I have not seen Sully. I plan to see the film as soon as practical.

I promised to provide a link to the NTSB report a few months ago. This seem like a good place for that link. I recommend against reading the report until after seeing the film.

Loss of Thrust in Both Engines After Encountering a Flock of
Birds and Subsequent Ditching on the Hudson River
US Airways
Flight 1549 Airbus A320‐214, N106US
Weehawken, New Jersey
January 15, 2009
Accident Report
NTSB/AAR-10/03
PB2010-910403
National Transportation Safety Board
Adopted May 4, 2010 
http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/AAR1003.pdf

NTSB Animation: US Airways Flight 1549 - The Hudson River Emergency Landing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiATqDUEP6k

Jason Paur
Gear
Date of Publication: 05.05.10.
Time of Publication: 6:00 am.
Sullenberger Made the Right Move, Landing in the Hudson
http://www.wired.com/2010/05/ntsb-makes-recommendations-after-miracle-on-the-hudson-investigation/

Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24386


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2016, 04:20:23 AM »

Just got back from seeing Sully. I really enjoyed it. It focuses on the investigation into the crash, sorry, forced water landing, which I didn't know about at the time and it is done well. At 96 minutes it tells its story and there was no reason to drag it out to Clint's usual 130 odd minutes.

All the cast are good although fans of Laura Linney will be disappointed. All her scenes, are of her at home talking to Tom Hanks on the phone.

Overall a good solid film.

4/5.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
antonis
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1396


I'm afraid you have misjudged me...


View Profile Email
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2016, 09:54:57 PM »

Just got back from seeing Sully. I really enjoyed it. It focuses on the investigation into the crash, sorry, forced water landing, which I didn't know about at the time and it is done well. At 96 minutes it tells its story and there was no reason to drag it out to Clint's usual 130 odd minutes.

All the cast are good although fans of Laura Linney will be disappointed. All her scenes, are of her at home talking to Tom Hanks on the phone.

Overall a good solid film.

4/5.

I totally agree.Best Eastwood effort of the decade. He proved that he is the best director around and a true master filmmaker.He made a film out of nothing.
Best scene....Hanks jogs under a Gran Torino poster (min 38 - 39)  :)
4/5
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 09:56:16 PM by antonis » Logged

a MAN has got to know his public's expectations...
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24386


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2016, 11:18:57 PM »


Best scene....Hanks jogs under a Gran Torino poster (min 38 - 39)  :)


Really. I missed that!! :(
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
-satu-
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1652



View Profile Email
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2016, 12:55:59 PM »

I really liked Sully. Great opening scene with the nightmare and waking up in the shadows, only eyes visible. Classic Eastwood. The theme song is also very classic Eastwood, jazzy piano tunes.

The movie shifts back and forth in time but it is very well made, and easy to understand. I remember J.Edgar being a bit more confusing on the first watch. It was easy to keep up with this.

Gran Torino ad was very visible on the wall of a building as Sully was jogging by. It was on a lighted screen, is it a billboard ad that you say there?   Anyway, it was big.

Crash scenes were powerful, I have no idea how they filmed that, even though I watched an interview with Clint who explained it. I guess it was a language barrier that kept me in the darkness for that part.

I felt excited going to the movies but also sad at the same time. Is there going to be a next project? I'm always hungry for more.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 12:57:00 PM by -satu- » Logged

Could anyone else have seen the beauty of it?
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6081


The real me


View Profile Email
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2016, 05:53:42 PM »

When I first heard about this project, I was pretty underwhelmed. Not to take anything away from Sullenberger because what he did was great. All 155 people got off that plane and his judgment and skill was the reason (along with a lot of first responders who were there to get them safely away from the plane).

But as time went on I did start looking forward to the movie, though the trailer did nothing to add to that. So going in I'd been looking forward to it, but not hugely anticipating it or without lots of expectations.

And I really liked it! O0 As I watched it reminded me some of American Sniper. Both stories about men trying to come to terms with being called a hero, and both haunted by their experiences. I could understand a bit more why this project could have appealed to Eastwood. So I'm happy to say I was wrong here.

I liked all the performances, especially Tom Hanks and Aaron Eckhart, which can be expected since they're the leads. Mike O'Malley was good as Charles Porter, the guy who led the investigation. O'Malley hosted a Nickelodeon show called Guts when I was a kid, so his appearance in anything always reminds me of that. ;D
Logged
exit00
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 420


Dying ain't much of a livin'


View Profile Email
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2016, 07:21:30 PM »

I also really liked this movie... watching those flight scenes and water landing on the Hudson on an IMAX screen was pretty awesome to see.   And loved the Clint cameo with the Gran Torino poster.

I agree with others that the performances by Hanks and Eckhart were really good.  Clint continues to get these outstanding performances by actors in his films.

Sorta like he did with Mystic River, Clint does a marvelous job in going back and forth between various scenes.  I also thought that it was a great idea to show the water landing a second time in a bit different way... wasn't expecting that.

So, for a movie I wasn't very excited about when I first heard about  it, I found it a fascinating watch.  Highly recommend.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 07:24:04 PM by exit00 » Logged
exit00
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 420


Dying ain't much of a livin'


View Profile Email
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2016, 07:40:19 PM »

Crash scenes were powerful, I have no idea how they filmed that, even though I watched an interview with Clint who explained it.

Here's a short but pretty neat clip of the movie with narration by Clint on filming it....

http://www.nytimes.com/video/movies/100000004632143/anatomy-of-a-scene-sully.html
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24386


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2016, 09:13:18 PM »

Gran Torino ad was very visible on the wall of a building as Sully was jogging by. It was on a lighted screen, is it a billboard ad that you say there?   Anyway, it was big.

Damn, I must have been taking a sip of wine for that scene. :(
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13785



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2016, 10:00:08 PM »

I missed the Gran Torino sighting also. :(

My Imax theater was disappointingly small. The last time I'd been in an Imax movie theater, it was a dome. The screen surrounded the seats on three sides. This theater just felt like a normal theater, with a taller screen. Is that normal?

Besides for the disappointing Imax experience, the film was fantastic. I was sorry that it ended so quickly because I wanted more. I realize it was based on a true event that lasted about 208 seconds, but I still wanted more of the plane and passenger experience. But what we got was great. I was so impressed with how well it was filmed. Having watched documentaries of actual footage of the landing (from security camera) and rescue efforts, it was impressively real to life.

If I was to criticize anything, it's that Laura Linney and her scenes were just there. I know we need to see Chesley Sullenberger as a man, not just a pilot, so it's important to show he had a home and wife. I just don't see how it could have been done better. But, those scenes were just the least impressive of the film.

I'm being super critical... because all in all, I loved it. Clint can direct anything, and he's proven that. This was a remarkable story, and it was told wonderfully. Tom Hanks was very good as Sullenberger. Aaron Eckhart was very good as the co-pilot Jeff Skiles. Breaking Bad fans will recognize Anna Gunn in a small role of the investigation team.

The rest are spoilers: 

It was so annoying to watch them WANT to show a different outcome. What was the reason for that? To pin Sully at fault, to escape an insurance payout? One of the greatest moments of the film was Sullenberger standing up for himself when they showed successful landings at both LaGuardia and Teterboro airports... then Sully asks how many times they practiced. And how much decision time did they have to know they needed to turn back or head to the alternate airport. This movie isn't just about the most successful water landing in the history of aviation, but also the way the press wanted to build a hero, and the airline industry wanted to dismantle him. In the end... they judged the "X factor" was Sully. Sully maintained it was a whole team. He's being modest. They all did their parts... but only one man made the decisions, and one man knew his limitations and what he needed to do. It's the story of a modern day hero.

Thanks for another incredible film, Clint!  O0
Logged
-satu-
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1652



View Profile Email
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2016, 11:59:54 PM »

I had to read about this IMAX. I was in a normal theater and it was a normal screen. So I think something was missing for that part. But since I didn't know what this IMAX was, I couldn't want it there or miss it.

I was also annoyed by the investigation team. Good thing Sully knew how to stand up to himself.

The ending had the same kind of real life-footage that American Sniper had too - of the real Sully and the passengers who survived. It was a nice touch.

Thanks Exit00, I'll check that out. :)
Logged

Could anyone else have seen the beauty of it?
exit00
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 420


Dying ain't much of a livin'


View Profile Email
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2016, 05:06:07 AM »


My Imax theater was disappointingly small. The last time I'd been in an Imax movie theater, it was a dome. The screen surrounded the seats on three sides. This theater just felt like a normal theater, with a taller screen. Is that normal?

If I was to criticize anything, it's that Laura Linney and her scenes were just there. I know we need to see Chesley Sullenberger as a man, not just a pilot, so it's important to show he had a home and wife. I just don't see how it could have been done better. But, those scenes were just the least impressive of the film.

Breaking Bad[/i] fans will recognize Anna Gunn in a small role of the investigation team.

Normally the IMAX screen is much larger than a normal "big" screen in a theater.  The one I went to curved on the left and right.  But it's not only the larger screen but more importantly the superior picture quality and sound of the movie. 

I mostly agree with your Laura Linney scenes assessment. They were important to the story but yet seemed standard fare.

Yeah, loved seeing Anna Gunn in the movie but she looked extraordinary different to me than she did on Breaking Bad.  Also note that Chris Bauer from The Wire also had a role.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2016, 05:07:16 AM by exit00 » Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24386


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2016, 04:32:05 PM »

Best scene....Hanks jogs under a Gran Torino poster (min 38 - 39)  :)

I'm now wondering if that was the same scene when I noticed the Aladdin type posters on flagpoles? We have them in Sydney at the moment with the stage show in town. Could this be a blooper since the musical didn't open in New York until 2014?
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2517



View Profile Email
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2016, 04:50:40 PM »

"Sully" is the work of a master filmmaker. On a technical level, it is very well done. The script is quite well written, the editing is tight, and the acting by Tom Hanks as Sully is understated yet quietly confident. It's exactly the kind of naturalistic performance Tom Hanks routinely delivers. The directing is also first-rate. I would have chosen a more rousing score, and given Laura Linney a bit more to do. While I personally would not have chosen this particular story to adapt into a film, there just isn't much story to tell here, I think this is the best Eastwood could have possibly done. As a director, Eastwood made the decision to have the events of the forced water landing unfold slowly. At different points in the film, more of the story unfolds and the events leading up to to the plane landing in the Hudson are told from a slightly different angle. The audience gets more and more information each time about what really happened. While I usually strongly dislike non-linear narratives, for this film, I think that it works because it keeps the audience engaged. A linear story, which is what I was initially expecting, with the landing preceding the investigation, would have been less interesting. Cutting back and forth between the investigation and the situation on the plane kept the tension high, which I think was needed for this film to work.

Filming "Sully" also allows Eastwood as a director to revisit familiar themes. While "Sully" is superficially about the "Miracle on the Hudson," on a deeper level, it really is about the portrait of a hero as a man. Eastwood as a director has always been very interested in heroism. At various points in his career, he's been interested in building up the mythology of the hero, he's been involved in the portrayal of genuine heroism, but he's also been interested as well in the heroes deconstruction. Films like the "Dirty Harry" and  Man with No Name series, films like "The Outlaw Josey Wales" and "Pale Rider," etc were films centered around the building up of the mythology of the hero. "Unforgiven," on the other hand, was about his deconstruction. Eastwood as a director knows well that when true heroes are not always available that they are sometimes manufactured. "Flags of our Fathers" in particular was about the manufacture of heroes, and I would argue "American Sniper" was as well, but that's for another discussion ;) Many Eastwood films often center around the idea of a hero being a product and portray heroism itself as a commodity that is sometimes used to uplift and that other times may be misused to manipulate.

In Eastwood's view, "Sully" is a genuine hero. He is not manufactured, but lesser men than him do seek to have him deconstructed. Eastwood bristles at that deconstruction. "Sully" genuinely saved the lives of 155 passengers on his plane by successfully landing a plan on a river, which had never before been successfully done. There was no way to prepare for this, there was no way to train for it, and yet "Sully," quietly, confidently, gets the job done. So, "Sully" is instead about the attempt to dismantle a hero and turn him into a villain to serve the interests of a board which is charged with finding things wrong when there may not be anything to find. In the media, "Sully" was hailed as a hero while behind the scenes an investigation was questioning his every move and casting doubt on everything that he had done. This is an interesting dichotomy the duality of which Eastwood portrays well.

"Sully" is also about something else, and that is that Eastwood has always respected those who are in the arena striving to act more than he does those who sit back and passively criticize the actions of those who have done. Those who devote their life to doing things are, in Eastwood's mind, better than the doubters and the naysayers and those who sit behind a desk and pontificate on how things that were done should have been better or differently or not at all. All the way back to "Dirty Harry," Eastwood has been casting a critical eye on those who keep their heads down and then proceed to criticize people like Harry Callahan who are on the front lines placing themselves in harms way to make society safer. From Dirty Harry to Frank Horrigan to Walk Kowalski to Chris Kyle, Eastwood has always admired men of action. "Sully," in his mind, is a man of action, and so the film portrays him as a man who is being potentially unfairly maligned by people who sit behind a desk, run computer simulations and then dare to question the man of action, Sully, who got the job done.

"Sully" is also about one last thing, and that is the value of decades of human experience. Computer simulations may have their place, but in Eastwood's mind, they can never replace men like Sully who have 40 years in the air, and whose richness of experiences have taught him things that cannot be learned by sitting at a computer. They also, in Eastwood's mind, shouldn't be second-guessed using the conclusions of those computers. As "Sully" states in the hearing at the end of the film, the human factor was missing in all of those computer simulations. A computer can't account for the time it takes a man to get his bearings, to recognize what is going on, to analyze different options and to make a decision on how to handle a crisis. The men who sit behind those computers have already decided the right course of action, and it still took them 17 times to successfully do what the computer says "Sully" could and should have done in the moment, in a crisis, when his life and everyone else's lives who were on that plane were on the line. A computer is only as good as the person inputtng data into it and can only work with the assumptions it has been told to make. Sully had none of these luxuries. He had to act because if he didn't, the job he needed to do wouldn't have been done, and the plane he was piloting would have crashed. Everyone he was responsible for safeguarding would have died. In this way, "Sully" is very similar thematically to "Trouble with the Curve," which pitted Gus Lobel's decades of experience scouting players in the field against the computer models of others who never scouted anyone. Like in "Trouble with the Curve," the human factor triumphs and the technological tools that everyone marvels about are found to be lacking. What is not lacking is Eastwood's ability to tell this story, and to do it well.
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13785



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2016, 08:58:34 PM »

  What a great review! I love how you can find ties to Eastwood themes that I would have never thought of, but then they make complete sense -- like the tie to the computer vs. human themes of Trouble With The Curve. The idea of true heroes vs. manufactured heroes is also an astute observation.

I think KC was right, AKA -- you could have a career in film review. :)
Logged
Gant
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5604


His job ..... steal it.


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2016, 10:23:08 PM »

Agreed, great review... Can't wait to see the film.
Logged

Borderline burnout with questionable social skills
B.C.
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4746


View Profile Email
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2016, 04:56:41 AM »

I almost missed the Gran Torino poster.  I got a kick out of seeing that and one of my uncles noticed it just before I did. 

When the first flashback occured I was praying this wasn't going to be another Flags Of Our Fathers.  The recurring flashback method wasn't used repeatedly in Sully so I was glad for that.  It's nice seeing Laura Linney in another Eastwood project.  I remember first seeing her in Absolute Power and then again in Mystic River.  She was also very good in The Truman Show with Jim Carrey.  When I saw Sam Huntington, I mistook him for Tom Guiry.  Guiry appeared in Mystic River.  While I recognized the actor, I learned later that it was from the Superman Returns film. 
Logged
antonis
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1396


I'm afraid you have misjudged me...


View Profile Email
« Reply #19 on: September 14, 2016, 06:57:40 AM »

Well done AKA. You managed to provide an in depth analysis from a theoretical point of view.
If a may ad something to all the previous comments  (including mine) is the value of the editing. A great job well worth further recognition.
Logged

a MAN has got to know his public's expectations...
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T