News: Watch Clint Eastwood's RICHARD JEWELL, now available streaming and on Blu-ray and DVD!


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Matt
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« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2003, 04:47:49 AM »

Just a note to our "taggers" that we're not really looking for trivia questions here when you tag someone.  The game is about learning how other members feel about Eastwood movies, gathering their opinions etc.  

Misty and Nightwing, go ahead and answer Mr. Pants' questions. I just wanted to make it a little clearer what we're looking for here, since I noticed Ravenwind also asked a trivia question in one of his tags.  I guess it's okay, but that's not really the point of this particular game.  :)
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Brendan
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« Reply #41 on: June 11, 2003, 07:09:20 AM »

Nightwing: How many total Academy Award nominations have Clint's movies recieved over the years?

For movies Clint has directed (and possibly starred in) its 14.

The Outlaw Josey Wales - Best Music Score

Bird - Best Sound

Heartbreak Ridge - Best Sound

Unforgiven - Best Actor
                  Best Supporting Actor
                  Best Director
                  Best Picture
                  Best Film Editing
                  Best Writing (Written directly for the screen)
                  Best Sound
                  Best Cinematography
                  Best Art Direction/Set Decoration
                   
The Bridges of Madison County - Best Actress

Space Cowboys - Best Effects/Sound Effects Editing

For films he just starred in, its 5.

Paint Your Wagon - Best Music Score

Thunderbolt & Lightfoot - Best Supporting Actor

In The Line of Fire - Best Supporting Actor
                             Best Writing (Written directly for the screen)
                             Best Film Editing

So altogether its 19 nominations.  8)


KC - Do you really think that Unforgiven deserved to win the Best Picture Academy Award? Why? (If you want, compare it to the other four nominated films)

D'Amb - If Bogart and Eastwood could have starred together in either one of their films, which one would it have to be?
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misty71
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« Reply #42 on: June 11, 2003, 09:15:08 AM »

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misty71: What was the actors name who played the midget in High Plains Drifter?

Gee Im terrible at questions like this! But I did a Yahoo search, and Bill Curtis is the answer.ok, my tags

LILLY:What do you think is the most romantic scene in an eastwood film and why?

MGK:In all of CE westerns what cowboy(worn by CE) hat did you like best and why?
« Last Edit: June 11, 2003, 11:11:20 AM by mgk » Logged

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« Reply #43 on: June 11, 2003, 09:25:18 AM »

Hey guys, sorry about the trivia questions. I am still figuring out how everything works. Good answers by the way!  ;D
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #44 on: June 11, 2003, 10:36:14 AM »

Oh, that's a good one Brendan.  Off the top of my head, I'd have to say City Heat.  Eastwood would still be in the role of Lieutenant Speer but I would substitute Bogie for Burt Reynolds in the role of Mike Murphy.  It would have been perfect role for Bogart, right up his alley in fact.  Directed by John Huston or Howard Hawks made back in the 40's in black and white.  This really could have been a good movie if things were just done a little differently.

A Bogart Movie that Eastwood would have been great in would have been The Treasure of The Sierra Madre 1948  Bogart would have still played the part of Fred C. Dobbs but substitute Eastwood for Tim Holt in the role of Bob Curtain, Dobbs prospecting partner.  Bogart is at his best and on top of his game in this movie about greed and paranoia.  It's great to watch all these characters unravel as the movie progresses and certainly would have brought out the best in Eastwood (acting wise).  This movie is a lot of fun to watch and great stuff in here as the old "Brother can you spare a dime... line Bogart keeps throwing at John Huston at the beginning of the movie has been parodied in so many things.  And of course the famous Badges?.....Badges?....We don't need no STINKING BADGES!!! line is timeless.  A must see for any Bogart novice.

Tags:
Brendan:  If you could cast Eastwood in any John Carpenter movie which one would it be and why?

Mr. Pants:  What was it specifically that turned you into an Eastwood Fan?    
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Mr. Pants
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« Reply #45 on: June 11, 2003, 11:02:54 AM »

Originally posted by DAmbrosia:
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Mr. Pants:  What was it specifically that turned you into an Eastwood Fan?    
Well I have always been a cowboy at heart. John Wayne has been my hero since childhood. He was the one who made me love westerns and six shooters. As I grew up I started to lean towards more mature westerns and Eastwood was there to fill the void. As everyone knows his themes are often dark and the hero can sometimes be construed as evil or good depending on the viewer's insight.

As I continue to watch his movies over and over again I am starting to notice how complex his plots can be and how he often times leaves the viewer to fill in the story. Its things like that, that make his movies timeless classics in my book. Just can't get enough of 'em!

New tags-

Doug: Whats your favorite spaghetti western and why?

Conan: Which CE movie do you cringe the most while watching?
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Brendan
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« Reply #46 on: June 11, 2003, 11:44:41 AM »

Brendan:  If you could cast Eastwood in any John Carpenter movie which one would it be and why?

Good one.

I cant really see Clint playing Dr. Loomis in Halloween or even Jack Crow in Vampires. But I can see him in Kurt Russells role of MacReady in The Thing.

I think Clint could've played it mostly the same as Russell did, with the quiet seriousness and also the bright intensity. And it would've been great to see Clint battle space aliens, in payment for abducting are board members.  ;D


Conan - What horror movie do you think Clint would have been good in?
« Last Edit: June 11, 2003, 11:48:03 AM by Brendan » Logged
mgk
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« Reply #47 on: June 11, 2003, 11:59:51 AM »

MGK:In all of CE westerns what cowboy(worn by CE) hat did you like best and why?

Misty, I have always liked the hat Eastwood wore in Two Mules for Sister Sara.  Borrowing a picture from Matt's great avatars that are free for everyone to use, and can be found HERE, this is the hat Eastwood wore in that movie.

For some reason that hat just looks really good on him and I really like the leather strip weaved in and out just above the brim of the hat.  ( :-[ Have no idea what that is called but maybe someone else does.)

bcm: Out of all of the Eastwood films that you are familiar with, what animal would you like to have as your very own?

AKA:  Is there an Eastwood movie that you really like that has a scene in it that you would like to change to make it even better?  If so, what movie/scene and how would you change it to make it better?
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bcm
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« Reply #48 on: June 12, 2003, 06:10:50 AM »

 :)  thanks mgk for tagging me, and for tagging me with a question I can answer easily! In case someone hadn't known so far: I like horses! So, the pick wasn't too hard. I haven't seen all the western movies yet, maybe there is still a beautiful horse to come, but so far I prefer the  one he's riding on when coming into the town in FFD.  ;)  ;D

No, I prefer the black one in GBU. There are different reasons for choosing that one. One reason is, this way I can find out if that horse gaites or not (hello graciante  ;))

allycat: on the old tag-game there was a question asked to Daisy, and you said you'd have liked to have that one. Well, here we go (I quote Matt): When looking over Easwtood's film career, do you feel, for the most part, that women are portrayed as strong or weak characters, and would you consider him a feminist filmmaker?

D'Ambrosia: what was first in your life: your love for Eastwood movies, or your love for guns? Are these related (as for example getting interested in guns because of the movies?)
« Last Edit: June 12, 2003, 06:12:03 AM by bcm » Logged

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« Reply #49 on: June 12, 2003, 02:49:40 PM »

  I was traveling and just got back...Sorry for missing the tags, I will catch up either tonight or tomorrow.
  Btw, starting June 22nd I will be gone for a month - in case I get tagged during that time period.
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #50 on: June 12, 2003, 07:29:14 PM »

Hope my answer is not too boring but here it goes…

I guess Guns.  I really started shooting at around 7 or 8 in around ’78 or so, Although I’d had seen Easstwood movies around that time I didn’t become a die hard  fan until around –83 or ’84 sneaking into Sudden Impact and being introduced to the The man with no name trilogy…

Growing up here in Ohio one of my fondest memories as a child was visiting my Grandfathers farm in Kentucky.  I can remember starting with BB guns and working up to shooting my fathers Remington 22 long.  A beautiful semi-automatic that he won in a raffle at a drug store in our neighborhood.  The owner was an ex-German fighter pilot from WWII and actually was known to have shot robbers that attempted any theft.  .  I can remembers shooting my grandfathers Remington Sweet 16 gauge semi-automatic shotgun for the first time and it scaring the you know what out of me, but then I grew to love it.  My grandfather also owned a snub-nose  Colt .38 Special and only on very rare occasions was I allowed to fire this gun.  I got to become quite a shot and on going to summer camp I mangaged to take home all the  trophies for marksmanship.  At the age of fourteen my favorite TV show at the time was the A-Team and the talk between my friends was the stainless steel Ruger Mini 14’s they started using during the second season, so I saved up my paper route money and the very first gun I bought for $400 bucks was a Ruger Mini 14 in 1984.  Man , my friends were impressed.  But being in Columbus I never had a whole lot of opportunity to fire the gun.  The muzzle velocity is so high on this weapon that bullet can travel  a couple of miles so my shooting the gun was limited to once again visits to my Grandfathers farm.  I got so good with the gun that I could field strip it blindfolded completely and put it back together in less then a minute and a half.

But anyway, my knowledge of guns has always been with me since a young age.  My best friends that grew up across the street from me were Scott and Jerry Patton, directly related to the General.  They had all kinds of military stuff and we played army all the time in the neighborhood.  When I moved across town and made new friends in ’83 I met the friend that turned me on to the Man with no name deal, (as I have told that story a zillon times in the past on this board.)  We always were watching movies and he was fascinated by the fact while watching any movie he could simply asked “what kind of gun is that”  and I always had an answer…

Here is the closest image to what my Rugar Mini 14 looks like…



My tags are:

Conan:  “Why don’t you like the character of Bronco Billy”? ;)
 
KC: “ If I were to buy a book on Eastwood, besides yours of course, which one should I get?”
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Conan
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« Reply #51 on: June 12, 2003, 08:02:30 PM »

Philo...
Which Clint Estwood film do you wish you had been able to see on the big screen ?

Although I like "The Outlaw Josey Wales" better, there is something about "The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly" (other than its awesomeness :) ) that makes me want to see it on the big screen.

Brendan/Nightwing...
If Clint was going to help Conan O'Brien do a skit on Late Night, what skit would you want to see him do?

Dirty Harry arrests The Master*****g Bear

Mr. Pants...
Which CE movie do you cringe the most while watching?

I don't watch "Paint Your Wagon", but if I did see it again, I would cringe.  Mainly when Lee Marvin starts singing (arggh, the humanity...)

Brendan/Nightwing...
What horror movie do you think Clint would have been good in?

"Salem's Lot".  Mainly because I really liked it despite a weak cast.  In other words, Clint could only make it better.

D'Amb...
Why don’t you like the character of Bronco Billy?

"Bronco Billy" is a good flick and I don't hate the Billy character...I just didn't like him near as much as most of Clint's other characters, he just rubs me the wrong way.


  I owe six tags, I'll put them up tomorrow.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2003, 08:03:14 PM by Conan » Logged

Brendan
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« Reply #52 on: June 12, 2003, 08:06:30 PM »

Brendan/Nightwing...
If Clint was going to help Conan O'Brien do a skit on Late Night, what skit would you want to see him do?

Dirty Harry arrests The Master*****g Bear

 ;D

Good choice. I'd like to see Clint and Conan go driving.
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Lilly
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« Reply #53 on: June 12, 2003, 08:22:56 PM »

Pick any movie made in the 90's, that you think Clint would have good for in a starring or supporting role, and name the character as well.
:) Cheers Brendan.  Man, this is a pretty tough one for me because until very recently I wasn't much of a movie watcher, and haven't seen many 90's films.  Speaking generally, I like to see Clint in films with a lot of character development, and where his persona is more vulnerable than in his earlier "tough guy" roles; parts like he took in The Bridges of Madison County and Unforgiven.  I can't think of any particular 90's movie which would have really suited him.  One possibility that came to mind was the leading role in JFK, but I was very young when I saw that so can't really remember enough to judge how he would have fitted in.  

On a completely different track... I didn't think much of Star Wars: Episode 1, but how cool would it have been to see Jedi Master Eastwood wield his light sabre against the Dark Side?!  ;D  I reckon he'd have made a great job of decapitating Ja Ja Binx! ;D

In your travels in the U.S., did you see any place that you think would make a good setting for an Eastwood film (aside from the ones that have already been in Eastwood films, of course!)
:) Thanks KC.  Cool question.  I fell in love with the landscape of the southwest, and there is so much of it that would be a marvellous backdrop to a movie, particularly a western.  Monument Valley is unique and stunning, but has been used so often in movies that it's become a cliche of the West.  I loved the eastern Sierra, but I think Pale Rider was set in that area.  Certainly Joe Kidd was filmed in the Alabama Hills near Lone Pine, but didn't use the landscape to it's potential.  I love the barren, windswept flats between the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada and Death Valley.  

(Photo from Chris Cook's website.)

There are many lava flows, reminiscent of a moonscape, and one particularly impressive high lava escarpment near Owen's Lake.  I can just picture Clint high on the edge of that escarpment; a lonely vagabond astride his horse, silhoetted against a harvest moon.  

Another beautiful area is the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.  Parts of Josey Wales were shot near there, and I think I recognised some of it in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, but there are endless possibilities and angles on the plateaux and canyons of that region.  I passed through during a build-up of storm clouds prior to heavy rain/snow fall and the effect of the sun highlighting the mesas and plateaux before such a huge, dark and menacing sky was truly dramatic.  I'd love to see Clint in a film that captured that feeling of impending mayhem, as the storm drew in, then finally burst upon the hapless, grizelled traveller, at the mercy of Nature.  


What do you think is the most romantic scene in an eastwood film and why?
:)Hi Misty.  An easy question for me! :D  This has to be from my fave, The Bridges Of Madison County.  Which particular scene is the most romantic?...Well, there are a few possibilities, but I have to go for the kitchen dancing scene, when Robert and Francesca first openly acknowledge their feelings for each other.  It's romantic because it takes things slowly; they don't just run off to bed, but gently hold each other, and dance to that wonderful song by Johnny Hartman, I see Your Face Before Me.  So much is said by Eastwood's and Streep's facial expressions, the way they look at each other, the way they take a few moments with their lips hovering close together before they actually kiss, the way she holds longingly to his shirt.  The viewer can feel the depth of care and passion between them.  I love the bit when they both suddenly break in to a smile.  Clint really looks in love...  *sigh*


Quote
You look stunning...make 'em run round the block howling in agony kinda stunning.

Coming back with my tags...
« Last Edit: June 12, 2003, 08:27:00 PM by Lilly » Logged
KC
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« Reply #54 on: June 12, 2003, 08:52:45 PM »

KC: “ If I were to buy a book on Eastwood, besides yours of course, which one should I get?”
Depends on what you're looking for, DAmb. If you want a biography, for all its flaws, Schickel's is still the one to get, because there's so much in it that's directly from Clint.

If you want a book that's more about the movies than the man ... probably the one I've enjoyed the most is Fuensanta Plaza's Clint Eastwood/Malpaso. It's chock full of in-depth interviews with many of Eastwood's collaborators, so you really learn a lot about how the films were made.

I'll be back with tags a bit later on ...
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« Reply #55 on: June 12, 2003, 09:08:40 PM »



And it is high quality, with great colour pictures .


Philo .
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Doug
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« Reply #56 on: June 12, 2003, 09:12:25 PM »

New tags-

Doug: Whats your favorite spaghetti western and why?

Thanks for the tag -- it's an easy one for me: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly is for me clearly my favorite.  Tuco's character is so much fun, and his interaction with Blondie is great.  The story has a great epic feel to it, but at its heart is a story of two bandits who can only play at having a conscience, and during the course of the movie come to like and respect each other, but are never able to really show it except through subtle gestures.  Neither can fully allow themselves to trust the other -- there's just a lot of heart to that movie, underneath the often comic machoism. They do become like brothers, but very wary brothers.  And it just has so many marvelous scenes.  

Anyway, my tags.

Mr. Pants: Back to you, I've got to ask what is the inspiration for your board name?

mgk: What's your favorite reoccuring theme in Clint's movies?  (I hope that's not a hard question!)
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« Reply #57 on: June 12, 2003, 09:44:09 PM »

Here are the tags I owe.

Misty71: You must be one of our youngest members, so I'm curious to know when you first became a Clint fan, and why - was it a particular film that got you interested?

Ravenwind: Hi. :)  I see you like The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, and Outlaw Josey Wales, so you're obviously a fan of Clint's westerns.  I'd like to know which of his non-western films you particularly appreciate, and why.  

Clintfan:  :) I see you have an avatar from a favourite Clint scene of mine, from In The Line Of Fire.  

Is this your favourite Clint movie?  If yes, why?  If no, which movie is your favourite, and why?

Frank Morris: Hei! :) You are clearly a big fan of Escape From Alcatraz.  What do you think makes it a great movie?  Any thoughts on whether Morris and the others made it to safety?
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« Reply #58 on: June 13, 2003, 03:26:04 AM »

My tags:

Doug: I'm sure you know Clint's characters only die in two of his movies, The Beguiled and Honkytonk Man (and in Bridges, he's dead to begin with) ... though he's sort of a ghost in a couple of others.

Imagine a change in one other Eastwood film so that his character would die at the end. How would that work? Would it make the film more, or less, satisfying?

Holden Pike: We don't hear much from you lately ... ;) ... It's easy to be disappointed after a film has been hyped too much in advance, but from what you've heard so far, are you looking forward to Mystic River? How do you think it will match up against the other fall releases?
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« Reply #59 on: June 13, 2003, 05:30:48 AM »


Frank Morris: Hei! :) You are clearly a big fan of Escape From Alcatraz.  What do you think makes it a great movie?  Any thoughts on whether Morris and the others made it to safety?

The thing that makes Escape From Alcatraz such a masterpiece is the genious work behind it. Don Siegel did extremly much pre-work and research. He wanted to make the film perfect and so he did. The details in the film is amazing. He had to study the rutines of the guards and the inmates to make it all fit together. How you see the escape itself in a sort of close wiew is incredible. And how they in real life managed to do this in one of the worlds best jails is beyond my belief. This is one of my alltime favourite movies ever!

Did they survive? I think so. Frank Morris was a very smart man with an high IQ. He had to have som kind of understanding of survival. I belive they all suvived. That is the thing that's exiting about this great flick. The mystery. Did they or did they not survive?
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