News: Watch Clint Eastwood's RICHARD JEWELL, now available streaming and on Blu-ray and DVD!


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eustressor
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« Reply #80 on: June 13, 2003, 05:20:07 PM »

(Mitch  Leary) makes a game out of the whole thing, teasing, sneaking into Horrigans life, into Horrigans thoughts...And, to add even more, he is played and filmed in a very scary manner, with death-cold eyes, that make you freeze when they look at you. No, I definitely would NOT like to meet him.

Nice description, bcm. I love John Malkovitch's ice-cold portrayal of Mitch Leary.

eustressor I see you've been busy already, so you won't mind another tag  ;). If, by magic, you could become any actor or actress, which character would you like to have played in Unforgiven?



 ;D ;D ;D

Ravenwind - Say you're a parent. Say you've decided your child is now old enough to enjoy movies, and you've decided that it's high time he or she be introduced to westerns. Not just any westerns, but a bonafide Clint western. Which film would you choose, and how old would the child need to be?
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Matt
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« Reply #81 on: June 13, 2003, 05:29:46 PM »


Matt:  Who do you think is the most innocent or the most "good" person, less tainted by life, in all of Eastwood's films to date?  And, no fair choosing LuAnn's small baby in Pink Cadillac  ::)....make it someone who has been around long enough to have had some of life's experiences but less swayed by the bad ones.

I've always thought that Delilah Fitzgerald in Unforgiven is the most angelic character in an Eastwood film.  If eyebrows are raising because she's a prostitute, well... I can see why that would cause a problem for some.  But, I look beyond that and see a woman who meets the description that mgk asked me for...
Quote
the most innocent or the most "good" person, less tainted by life.


(Since I have a choice between "most innocent" and "most good"... I'll pick "most good" in this case.)

Although Deliliah is the one who was savagely attacked and disfigured, unlike Strawberry Alice and the other whores she doesn't seek vindication for the brutal act.  She understood that the other women needed THEIR vengence for the assault on her, so she stood by silently as they hired the killers, although she never showed any need or desire for her own revenge.  Unlike the others, she seemed truly touched by Davey's offer of the best horse he had, offering more than what he was fined because he was sorry to have been involved in her attack.  Delilah's expression in that scene tells me that she had forgiven him, whereas the others couldn't.  And when the whores yelled at and chased Davey and Quick Mike away with stones, Delilah stood by showing no anger, only regret over what had happened and sadness over what was to come.

Athough we can imagine that Delilah had lived a painful and heartbreaking life, rather than dwell on her misfortunes, she was still a giver.  She still had the love and compassion within her to nurse Munny back to health when he was close to death from fever.  

For all these reasons, and because Delilah never lost her faith in the goodness of people, I am naming her....


THE GOODEST CHARACTER IN THE LAND OF EASTWOOD :D

(Stand by for tags)
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Conan
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« Reply #82 on: June 13, 2003, 05:51:22 PM »

  Ok, I owe eight tags.  Game on:


Brendan: You can meet one actor that has appeared in an Eastwood movie, but not Clint himself.  Who do you choose to meet?


Christopher: You are William Munny.  Do you avenge the prostitute who got her face scarred for life or stay at home and take up knitting?


D' Ambrosia: Who is the most cliche and cheesiest of all of Clint's characters?


Holden Pike: In the 1970s could Sam Peckinpah and Eastwood have come together to make a really good western?  Or could Peckinpah not get the most out of Eastwood?


Ravenwind: Who is the most annoying character in all of Eastwood's movies?


Matt: You are Robert Kincaid.  Do you commit adultery with a married Francesca or find one of the MANY single (non-married) women on the planet?


KC: You are offered 150 million dollars to edit a book on Eastwood's life.  Problem is, many of the details are flawed and it is mostly negative - and you can't edit out either.  Do you sell out or cash out?


Misty: If you could ask Clint one question, what would it be and why?
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Matt
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« Reply #83 on: June 13, 2003, 06:17:22 PM »

 
Matt: You are Robert Kincaid.  Do you commit adultery with a married Francesca or find one of the MANY single (non-married) women on the planet?

I've already gone on the record as saying that I think Robert and Francesca would have been better off had they never met.  Especially in Robert's case.  But since they do...  

As Robert Kincaid, I've already found MANY single (non-married) women on the planet to sleep with.  But in all my years I never found a soul mate, someone who understood me and who I wanted to really know and understand too.  And I've lived some 60 years without finding that, not thinking there was anyone like that for me... thinking I was different from the others.  Then I find her... and I know, finally, what it's like to love and be loved.  And she's already married.  

I'd have dinner with her, I'd talk with her and spend every minute with her that I could... but I probably wouldn't sleep with her.

(I think I should get 20 tags for that one.)
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Matt
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« Reply #84 on: June 13, 2003, 06:24:11 PM »


Matt : You're a friend of Clint, or his agent or something, and he comes to you for some advice. He asks you about his next film, he's not sure what he should do. He wants to know what kind of movie his fans want from him, and what kind of film he should do next. Of course, he wants to keep telling intelligent stories for an adult audience, what would you say? What would you like to see for Clint's next? Maybe give a  brief plot outline, or, if that's too difficult, the genre of the film.

I know I've answered this same question in the old tag game, and I'm pretty sure it was you who tagged me with it, AKA.  What I'd suggest is an intelligent psychological thriller, with an air-tight script and all the little bugs and plot holes worked out.  And I'd tell Clint that I think it would be a good move for him to work alongside other big name actors and actresses again.

Is that good enough for tags, AKA?
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AKA23
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« Reply #85 on: June 13, 2003, 07:08:44 PM »

What do you mean is it good enough for tags? I didn't get that. Now that you mention it, I think you DID answer that question, or some variation of it, in the old tag game. Sorry Matt. I didn't mean to re-use a question. Your answer sounds familiar though. :(
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misty71
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« Reply #86 on: June 13, 2003, 07:08:48 PM »

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Misty: If you could ask Clint one question, what would it be and why?

And I thought Id be just checking the board and going to bed,now I got the hardest question Ive been asked so far ;)
 Ok Ill give this a shot; Whats hard about it is what question hasent he been asked already?I think I would ask him how he figured his life would be if he hasnet become a movie star.Would he play jazz? would he just work 9-5 everyday and be one of the crowd? Id ask him how he pictured his life without the acting.
 Im sorry if this is a dissapointing answer, but there are so many things I'd ask him, it's hard to narrow it down to one question.
 Hey, I got a good one, I could just ask "Hey there clint, what question would you like to be asked?"  ;)

Ok Tagging....

MATT:you mentioned big name actors and actresses in your reply to AKA's tag. Who do you think would have been better in the role of the murderer in "Bloodwork"
than Jeff Daniels?(I dont know, but once youve seen dumb and dumber, jeff doesnt make such a convincing killer)and why?

EUSTRESSOR:What location (city, country, whatever)of a clint movie do you find the most beautiful and why?
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« Reply #87 on: June 13, 2003, 07:35:45 PM »

Lilly, you have no idea how much I like to tell that little story! ;DIt all started on may 31st, 2001, clints birthday. There was an eastwood marathon on TBS and I was surfing trought the channels, when I came across a movie named "dirty harry" I thought "hey that looks good" so I watched it. Halfway through the film I was like hypnotized, it was just SOOO good.
 Now Ive always been a music fan, so I didnt know much about movies. I called up my mom and said "hey, who's that Clint eastwood guy?" She said "oh he made a lot of movies. Hes a great actor" So I came home, and there was "in the line of fire" I watched it and that was it; I searched through the internet, and decided I wanted ALL the Clint movies. (Im like that, like when I find a band I like, I want EVERYTHING about them, you could say I work on love at first sight ;))
 So anyways, the next day, I started my collection (The rookie was my 1st tape, I bought it a garage sale for 1$, Thank god it didnt turn me off completely of beeing a clint fan) And a couple weeks later, I had like 10 movies.
Now, I have only a few missing and Im very happy I watched Dirty Harry that night!

 :) Thanks for sharing, Misty.  I enjoyed your story.  I also "discovered" Clint by accident on the TV (In The Line Of Fire). 8)
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« Reply #88 on: June 13, 2003, 08:00:51 PM »

EUSTRESSOR:What location (city, country, whatever)of a clint movie do you find the most beautiful and why?

Great question, Misty - thanks :)



I have always been transfixed by the circular cemetery that provides the eerie backdrop for the climax of The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. The swelling music, Tuco's amazing run among the swirling graves, the final standoff in the center... there's just something, some quality simultaneously beautiful and chilling, that really grabs me, every time...

Christopher - You step into an elevator in a high-rise hotel and realize that you are sharing it with one other person...Clint. He's in the middle of a heated cell-phone conversation. A few floors up, he suddenly exclaims, "Dammit, I'm just too old to go galavanting around playing politician!" and ends the call. Then he leans forward and stops the elevator, turns to you looking every bit like Harry Callahan, and says, "What do you think? Should I run for Governor of California?"
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Matt
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« Reply #89 on: June 13, 2003, 08:08:20 PM »


Matt - Let's talk music. Niehaus vs. Morricone. How are they similar, and how are they different? What are their respective strengths, and do you have a preference?


Whoo, like comparing apples and oranges!  

Well, they're similar in that they're both composers who have worked on films that star Clint Eastwood. ;)

What I see as Niehaus's biggest strength is that his scores are unobtrusive and never detract the viewer from the action of the films and the scores seem to complement the tone of the films.  Another strength is that Niehaus works well with Eastwood and creates beautiful orchestration for his compositions.  These compositions are usually the highlight of the score, such as "Kate's Theme" in Absolute Power, "Doe Eyes" in The Bridges of Madison County, "Espacio" from Space Cowboys, "Big Fran's Baby[/i] from A Perfect World, "Amanda's Theme" from Tightrope and "Claudia's Theme" from Unforgiven.

Morricone's worked on some 400 or so films, but I've only heard his compositions for the five Eastwood films he's worked on and for Leone's Once Upon A Time in the West).  It seems a little unbalanced and unfair for me to attempt to discuss his music and strengths without being more exposed to his work.  Still, these scores, especially the four Leone scores mentioned above, are all the greatest scores I've ever heard, with The Good, The Bad and The Ugly standing tallest as the greatest film score of all time (in my opinion).  So, I can definitely say I have a preference, and that is very much toward Morricone.

Some of Morricone's strengths: able to produce an amazing, innovative score on a shoestring budget using voice, harmonica, trumpets and electric guitar rather than a full orchestra; majestic themes that you remember long after the film is over; music that fits the film like a glove, but rather than being in the background, the music is in the foreground and adds tremendously to the emotional impact of the film, and (IMO) is never distracting.

I have a few original scores from the Niehaus films, and I really don't enjoy listening to them, with the exception of the Eastwood compositions.  In fact, I can point to only one song that Niehaus composed on his own that I find enjoyable, and that is "Christy's Dance" from Absolute Power.  It's not great, but it's also not the usual "background" music that he composes.  Whereas, I almost always have the GBU soundtrack in the platter, or real close.  It's also great to drive with....  "GO! GO! GO, MANCO!!!"  :D
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Matt
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« Reply #90 on: June 13, 2003, 08:24:52 PM »

What do you mean is it good enough for tags? I didn't get that. Now that you mention it, I think you DID answer that question, or some variation of it, in the old tag game. Sorry Matt. I didn't mean to re-use a question. Your answer sounds familiar though. :(

That's okay.  I'll tag then. :)
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Matt
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« Reply #91 on: June 13, 2003, 08:39:36 PM »


MATT:you mentioned big name actors and actresses in your reply to AKA's tag. Who do you think would have been better in the role of the murderer in "Bloodwork"
than Jeff Daniels?(I dont know, but once youve seen dumb and dumber, jeff doesnt make such a convincing killer)and why?

That's a tough one for me... maybe if I had a list of actors to choose from, I'd be able to pick someone.  I've been thinking and thinking, and going crazy here.  I'm gonna cop out and give a pretty unoriginal answer here and say De Niro.  He'd definitely be able to pull it off without it being laughable, and I'd love to see Clint and Robert work together.  

Now I get to tag.  I'll be back with a bunch. :)
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Christopher
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« Reply #92 on: June 13, 2003, 08:49:12 PM »

From Brendan:
Quote
Christopher: If Clint could have played a bad guy/villian from any movie in the 90's and 2000's what villian would it have to be?
Shoot! Sorry, I can't think of anything. Of all the movies I've seen from the 90s to the present, I can't see Eastwood as a villain in any of them. (Since I'm kind of bailing out on your question, I won't tag anyone for this)

From Conan:
Quote
Christopher: You are William Munny.  Do you avenge the prostitute who got her face scarred for life or stay at home and take up knitting?
As much as I, Will Munny, killer of women and children, love to knit, I'd probably have to go out hunting for the ones who cut up that hooker. ;D

From eustressor:
Quote
Christopher - You step into an elevator in a high-rise hotel and realize that you are sharing it with one other person...Clint. He's in the middle of a heated cell-phone conversation. A few floors up, he suddenly exclaims, "Dammit, I'm just too old to go galavanting around playing politician!" and ends the call. Then he leans forward and stops the elevator, turns to you looking every bit like Harry Callahan, and says, "What do you think? Should I run for Governor of California?"

Assuming I could speak and think clearly while getting the Callahan look, I'd say "No!" And I'd probably try to tell him that he'd be taking a huge step down in his career. He's too good of a filmmaker for such things.

Be back with tags.
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Matt
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« Reply #93 on: June 13, 2003, 09:01:48 PM »

TAGGING.......

PHILO:  I don't recall you ever discussing how you discovered Eastwood films.  Which film of his was the first that you remember seeing?  Was it the one that made you a fan?  How old were you at the time?

BRENDAN:  Out of all of the "leading lady" roles in Eastwood films... which character do you find to be the least likeable, or who you've wondered how Eastwood's character could be interested in her?

STRANGER:  I'm gonna ask you the same question I just asked Philo.  Hope you have the time to jump in here and answer! :)

GANT:  What is your favorite Eastwood film score or soundtrack?

VIK:  Name a product that you can imagine Eastwood endorsing.

PALM:  Where have you been?  Well let's see if we can get you back here on the board again!  I know that you love Robert and Francesca's relationship probably the best out of all of Eastwood's onscreen romances.  What would be your second choice?
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« Reply #94 on: June 13, 2003, 09:09:32 PM »

Brendan: Since I didn't answer your question to me, I'll ask you the same one. If Clint could have played a bad guy/villian from any movie in the 90's and 2000's what villian would it have to be?

Doug: Assuming you haven't already answered a question like this: how did you get interested in Eastwood and his films?

MGK: If you knew someone who had never seen an Eastwood movie before, which one would you recommend for them?
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« Reply #95 on: June 13, 2003, 09:29:25 PM »

Whats your favorite CE movie starring Sandra Locke?
;D Nice one Mr. Pants!  I'm guessing you saw my wee smiley about Any Which Way You Can in the scavenger hunt game. ;)

I haven't seen Sudden Impact or Bronco Billy, but of the other films with Sondra Locke my favourite by a mile is The Outlaw Josey Wales.  I'm not a great fan of Locke as an actress, and didn't think her performance in Josey was anything special, but the film as a whole is very good, and among Clint's best.  

Edit add: Just for the record, I do like the Clyde movies, especially Any Which Way... which is always good for a laugh and to lift one's spirits. :)

Be back with tags...
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« Reply #96 on: June 13, 2003, 10:09:24 PM »

MGK: If you knew someone who had never seen an Eastwood movie before, which one would you recommend for them?
I guess that would depend on a lot of factors...age, sex, level of maturity, etc.  But, since more people like cop or detective movies than like westerns, I think I would choose Dirty Harry.  The pace is good, the tension is there, it has an excellent villain, and it showcases Eastwood's "less is more" style in films.  If they came back and asked for "seconds," I think I would show them what a good western is supposed to look like and I would give them The Outlaw Josey Wales to view.  I'm not saying that "Josey Wales" is the best western Eastwood has made but it's a really good one for a newcomer.  If they still wanted more... ;D...I would introduce them to the spaghetti westerns.  Then, if I had them hooked, I would start showing them some of his smaller films such as Bronco Billy and A Perfect World.  If they got that far, then my job would probably be done.

zoso:  I remember you saying not too long ago that you bought quite a few Eastwood DVDs.  Have you had time to watch some of them?  If so, which one that you most recently purchased did you like the best?  If not, then which Eastwood film is your favorite and why?

Xichado:  What is your favorite scene in all of Eastwood's impressive list of films he has starred in, starred and directed, or even directed and not starred in?
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« Reply #97 on: June 13, 2003, 10:59:37 PM »

Doug: Assuming you haven't already answered a question like this: how did you get interested in Eastwood and his films?


Here, I thought I'd be scarse from the board while in Ohio, but I'm finding my brother's cable connection to be most appealing... :D  Yeah, I've answered this question before, but it's okay.


Essentially I grew up with his movies.  My mom was a huge fan.  She'd watched Rawhide, but it was Where Eagles Dare and then Dirty Harry that turned her completely and utterly into a fan ... as I was born in 1970, I grew up with his movies on the TV all the time.  And I watched them all everytime they were on TV.  Kids now grow up watching Disney movies over and over.  There was no vcr's or cable for me at that age so I grew up with his movies on TV, and it was a passion that I shared with my mother.  Through my life I have never tired of Clint, and I was able to appreciate more about his movies as I grew older.   When I got my first computer in 1997, one of the first things I did was look up Clint Eastwood on the internet and I found this site.  When I finally discovered the web board and became active, I began to renew myself with his movies, and see them with different eyes....i.e. as an older person with more insight and more knowledge about filmmaking and storytelling, and to experience his movies with people who shared my passion for Clint Eastwood.  So it's been great to have that experience, to find a way really to reconnect with my younger self.  (If that makes any sense.)  I never ceased being a huge fan, (as I was blown away away by Unforgiven in the theatre and I always appreciated the artistry of White Hunter, Black Heart, for example) but over the last few years I've been able to discover new depths to his movies and appreaciate them in a way I was never able to before.  I've always liked The Beguiled for instance, even though my mome always disliked the movie -- I'm the type of person to like a movie like that -- and now at age 33 I can watch it and appreciate all that I liked about it at the earliest age I saw it and also all that I see in the movie now and all that everyone else here sees in the movie as has been brought up in the film discussions.  

The short answer, though, is that I grew up with his movies, and for as long as I can remember thinking about such things, I've always thought there was much more to his films than he was being given credit for.  

Zoso: What's your favorite Clint quote in any of his movies?  
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« Reply #98 on: June 14, 2003, 12:22:01 AM »

My tags

ropearoundhisneck: Eastwood has many famous quotes. What quote did you like best and why?

Orville : what is it about Clint Eastwood that makes him so special? What seperates him from all other actors?
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« Reply #99 on: June 14, 2003, 01:16:12 AM »

Sorry, here are my tags. Since I still have a few tags out, and want to see this game start really rolling, I'm tagging moderators this time 'round :
KC - English Bob and Little Bill. Who would you rather live next door to? Who would you rather have as a co-worker? If you could, use an example or two from the movie to explain your choices.
Hmmm ... since I live in New York, it really wouldn't matter which one I live next door to ... I never see my neighbors anyway. I think I'd pick English Bob. He'd play a better sort of music (and not too loud or too late at night), and he'd be more polite if he met me in the elevator once in a while.

As for a co-worker ... I want Little Bill. And I want him to have the same boss I have. Maybe that's enough said ... I'd really rather not give the example from the movie that I'm thinking of!...   :o  ;)

Great question, eustressor!


KC : Is there any Eastwood film that you've seen that you see people liking, and you wish that you could like it more too, but you don't. Some people are heaping praise on it, but for you, it's just okay, nothing really special, and you wish that you could see in it what other people are seeing? It can either be a film that you'd like to enjoy just for entertainment value, or one that you see as a good achievement artistically, but isn't as enjoyable as you'd like for it to be. And, don't automatically just say no. Try to think about it.
Sure AKA ... that's easy. Every Which Way but Loose! And Any Which Way You Can ...  ;)

KC: You are offered 150 million dollars to edit a book on Eastwood's life.  Problem is, many of the details are flawed and it is mostly negative - and you can't edit out either.  Do you sell out or cash out?
That's easy ... of course I'd sell out, for 150 million smackeroos! I'd buy the publishing house, pulp the smear job,  and publish my own, impeccable and definitive, monograph on the topic.

I'll have to come up with tags sometime tomorrow ... it may be late. I have a busy day coming up!
« Last Edit: June 14, 2003, 01:43:18 AM by KC » Logged
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