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Author Topic: 3 films to recommend Clint to new viewers  (Read 3386 times)
Perry
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« Reply #40 on: May 24, 2018, 12:02:10 PM »



      Eastwood was never a mediocre actor. That was made up nonsense by Pauline Kael who was basically an overrated 'Film Critic'. I think Eastwood from his early years got loop holed as the next 'Gary Cooper,' and all these other Cowboy actors which was equally lame. Basically the Leone movies made him a target since there wasn't much emotion required. As Eastwood got older he did get better. Certainly 'Tightrope, Bridges, and even White Hunter proved that as small examples. To me Eastwood was always the same guy and lasted longer than any one in the history of Hollywood. Now these clowns cant say anything. If anyone is mediocre as an actor it's Chuck Norris.
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Perry
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« Reply #41 on: May 24, 2018, 04:09:32 PM »


Actually now that I think about it Costner and Harrison Ford are quite overrated and mediocre as actors. For awhile there they were lauded and fawned over by the very same critics who ostracized Eastwood. Where are they today?...... bye bye.....Eastwood @ 88 still relevant.....
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AKA23
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« Reply #42 on: May 24, 2018, 06:35:09 PM »

Perry, those are some great choices. I particularly like "Tightrope," since it's an example of Eastwood superficially playing a character which is a variation of the cop archetype which he had portrayed a lot at that point in his career,  while at the same time giving a much deeper, more complex, multi-layered performance that allows him to evolve both the character and his performance.

Wes Block is a case study that allows the viewer to probe the darkness that is often inherent in the job of homicide detective, and the way in which that kind of job can weigh on you so much that you need an outlet to escape from it. A hallmark of Eastwood's work is the frailty of the human condition, and the tendency of man to often choose self-destructive outlets, which is exactly what Wes Block does. That self-destructive outlet can serve as a respite from the rigors, struggles, and emotional highs and lows of living to "serve and protect," but it comes at great cost, and I think Eastwood's performance displayed that cost in a powerful way. In that way, Wes Block can serve as both an archetypal cop character as well as a little bit of a deconstruction of that character at the same time. Wes Block is not a glamorous character who is excited by the prospect of being a cop. He gets no glee from his job. He almost seems burdened by it, and the weight of that burden and the darkness that it leads him to allows for Eastwood to deconstruct and in some ways demythologize the cop archetype that he has portrayed so many times before. This kind of building up of a mythology only to later deconstruct it is something Eastwood has done a lot in his career.

KC, thanks for contributing to this discussion. It seems like we're all using the same approach here by trying to select films that are atypical for Eastwood, that allow the viewer to see that he can and sometimes does stretch himself as an actor by playing with familiar themes in new and different ways. We also seem to be choosing films that might not have been widely seen by this hypothetical person. I think I get why you'd choose "The Beguiled" and "Bridges," but why "Play Misty for Me?" I think that's a pretty interesting choice, and not one I would have initially thought of. What is your thinking behind that? 

 
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KC
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« Reply #43 on: May 24, 2018, 09:42:59 PM »

If you didn't know anything about Clint except the three "Dollars" films and Dirty Harry, and someone told you Clint is also a director, and his directorial debut is about a laid-back California jazz disc jockey, who is in an on-again, off-again relationship with a wan blonde, but he never lets that stop him from picking up attractive women in a bar where he hangs out after work ... seriously, if I then asked you who you think he cast as the disc jockey, would you ever in a million years have answered "Himself"?

It's a very un-Eastwood like role, and he's excellent in it.
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Doug
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« Reply #44 on: May 25, 2018, 01:41:11 AM »

If you were going to recommend and show 3 films of Clint's (as actor) to a new viewer who hadn't seen any of his work before,  which three would you choose.. ?

Responding to this question in the most literal way possible, I'd just show the person the first three Dirty Harry films. If they aren't a fan of his by the time the title credits are done in Dirty Harry, then there might not be hope for them.

If the objective is to show someone his range or variety of performances or roles from different eras, then I'd have to rethink my answer. For instance if someone said they weren't familiar with him and as far as they knew he just stared in a bunch of westerns and cop movies, I'd probably want to show them Play Misty for Me, Bronco Billy, and White Hunter, Black Heart. Or maybe The Bridges of Madison County if I didn't think the subject would turn them off, since I've always considered that his absolute best acting performance.
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« Reply #45 on: May 25, 2018, 04:22:24 PM »

Thanks for contributing your thoughts to this discussion, Doug. I like your choices! I too think Eastwood's performance is underrated in "The Bridges of Madison County," which is why that was one of the three that I chose myself. I think some people felt that he wasn't a good fit for the role because it was too far outside the norms of the tpes of characters that he's known for, so it seems like Clint sometimes can't win. He does something outside of the box that stretches his acting muscles, but because people aren't used to seeing him that way, they don't appreciate the achievement in the performance.

I set up the question this way on purpose, since if someone said that they didn't think Eastwood was a good director, then there isn't much hope that they'd be open minded enough to consider him a good actor. But someone who recognizes that he is in fact a good director may be persuaded to consider a different perspective on him as an actor if shown the way.
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Perry
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« Reply #46 on: May 26, 2018, 07:18:58 PM »


          AKA23, Well, the thing with Tightrope was @ the time I saw it I was rapidly losing interest in most of Eastwood's movies that followed ( Though Alcatraz was a good flick) after TOJWales. Tightrope was a great departure, but mostly I was thrilled not to see Sondra Locke in the movie. I detested Sudden Impact ( for the Locke reason) and thought the Dirty Harry character had become ridiculous and embarrassingly like a comic book. Regardless, Eastwood's Wes Block was a departure as a flawed and damaged person. I thought Eastwood finally was doing a role that would be taken serious. Even after all these years his performance is still one of my faves. It's a dark movie,but I always felt Eastwood didn't do enough of those type roles @ the time and Bujold was always an interesting actress. I once read Susan Saradon turned down Bujold's role.... Anyhow, Rebecca Perle cancels out Locke any day...........
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Gant
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« Reply #47 on: June 02, 2018, 04:28:03 AM »

Well... it happened..
I got chatting to a girl in Spain recently whilst touring, she was a big film fan, I'd guess her age maybe late 20's.
She was aware of who Clint Eastwood was but couldnt actually remember ever having seen any of his films
so I recommended Tightrope.. She messaged me a couple of days ago saying she loved it, not what she'd expected at all..thought Bujold was fantastic as well as Clint, thought the film interesting and atmospheric, dealing with dark themes and said she'd be looking further into his career as actor and director..

My work is done.. a new fan launched..

Perry, totally agree with you about Harrison Ford.. Totally mediocre as an actor and in his choice of films..
« Last Edit: June 02, 2018, 04:29:19 AM by Gant » Logged

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Christopher
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« Reply #48 on: June 03, 2018, 04:04:33 PM »

Nice job, Gant! O0
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Jed Cooper
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« Reply #49 on: June 20, 2018, 04:47:20 AM »

I would go with A Fistful Of Dollars and Dirty Harry for the first two.  I agree with Matt that it would be better to introduce the Leone westerns with the first one.  If it went over well, the interest would be there to follow up with the sequels.

The same goes for Dirty Harry but I’d suggest only watching the first two sequels before moving on.

For the third film, I’d suggest Any Which Way You Can because it’s more entertaining out of the two “monkey” comedies.  These films do not have to be watched in order. 

To recap:

1. A Fistful Of Dollars
2. Dirty Harry
3. Any Which Way You Can

I may even suggest viewing Dirty Harry first, followed by the western and then the comedy. 

If these went over well, I’d then suggest the police and western sequels and comedy prequel.  I think this would be a great place to start.  🙂


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Gant
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« Reply #50 on: June 20, 2018, 06:02:07 AM »

Jed, cool films but I'm a little surprised you prefer the sequel out of the "which Way" films..
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« Reply #51 on: June 28, 2018, 07:56:34 AM »

A Fistful of Dollars

For A few dollars more

The Good the bad and the Ugly

Coogan's Bluff

Dirty Harry

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AKA23
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« Reply #52 on: June 28, 2018, 02:31:08 PM »

Aline, welcome back! It's great to hear from you on this.

Why did you choose these films?
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Aline
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« Reply #53 on: June 29, 2018, 08:39:50 AM »

Thank you, Aka.

 I chose those because are his earlier movies, they are the "beginning" and they make the viewer want to see more and more about the actor, at least it was this way to me.
Sergio Leone trilogy save any justification, he plays very charismatic characteres especially in a A Fistful of Dollars, a man giving his life to help a lady and her son. Coogan's Bluff has a special meaning to me, it was first Clint movie I watched and turned me into a fan and made me want to know who was that actor. Dirty Harry also saves any explanation, impossible not to be moved by that cop that lives for the sake of fight evil.The following movies only will make the viewer enjoy him more and more like in High Plains Drifter.
I didn't indicate any of his later/recent movies, even if they are great, because I see them as a "consequence" of the fame he got with earlier ones. I think is important to a new viewer see the early films first so they will be able to follow the image of the tough guy being deconstructed which he does well in In the Line of Fire, Unforgiven and others.

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KC
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« Reply #54 on: June 29, 2018, 07:15:42 PM »

Great post, Aline! It's so nice to have you back. :)
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AKA23
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« Reply #55 on: June 30, 2018, 10:40:38 AM »

Yes, this is a very interesting post! I completely agree with you that it is most satisfying as a fan to watch Eastwood grow as an actor and director as his career has progressed.
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Hocine
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« Reply #56 on: June 30, 2018, 08:20:14 PM »

I think that your choices are interesting and logical.
I would say that if I had to recommend some movies to someone who doesn’t know Clint Eastwood as an actor, I’d pick up one Sergio Leone movie, one Don Siegel movie and one Clint Eastwood movie.
For example, The Good the Bad and the Ugly or For a Few Dollars More, Dirty Harry or The Beguiled,
and Play misty for Me or The Outlaw Josey Wales.
I think that these movies are among the best of what Clint Eastwood did in the sixties and the seventies.
They are quintessential: the western genre, the cop movie genre, jazz music, violence, justice, vengeance, the loner, America’s history, relationship between men and women are well developped in these movies.
We must not forget that Sergio Leone and Don Siegel have influenced Clint Eastwood.
So, they were important for him.
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KC
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« Reply #57 on: July 01, 2018, 08:00:49 AM »

Very good choices, Hocine, and I like your reasoning. Leone and Siegel are an important part of what made Clint Eastwood who his is. Since they both came at the beginning of Clint's career, seeing two of their films with him plus an early film that Clint directed would also keep with Aline's idea that one should be allowed to start with the early things, then follow his rather astonishing development through the last several decades.
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Gant
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« Reply #58 on: July 01, 2018, 10:20:02 AM »

My new Spanish friend is apparently hooked after watching Tightrope and has asked for a second recommendation.
I know she's a big fan of 1970's cinema... I'm tempted to put Thunderbolt and Lightfoot forward..
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« Reply #59 on: July 01, 2018, 01:05:39 PM »

That is exciting. You are responsible for someone becoming an Eastwood fan! Of his nontraditional films during the 1970’s, my favorite is “Escape from Alcatraz.” Has she seen that? Ive always thought of Thunderbolt as more Jeff Bridges time to shine.
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