News: In theaters December 14: THE MULE, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


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Author Topic: Rear Window (1954)  (Read 510 times)
Doug
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« Reply #40 on: October 23, 2018, 05:01:38 AM »

This video for unknown reasons just happened to be a "recommended video" and it's not bad. It covers much of what we've discussed in this thread but offers a few subtleties we didn't cover.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/e4Yw8hz3tG8" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/e4Yw8hz3tG8</a>

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"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
AKA23
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« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2018, 08:32:39 AM »

This is a really interesting video with a thought-provoking perspective on the film. Thanks for sharing, Doug!
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #42 on: November 05, 2018, 10:17:04 PM »

The first 30 odd minutes of this film is so slow but it is setting up all the characters in the film. Not just Jimmy Stewart watching Raymond Burr's apartment. You have the young married couple, the older couple with a dog, the dancer who seems to be with a different guy each night while her husband is away in the service. The lonely heart lady in the lower apartment and the piano player in the top apartment. They all have stories to tell which are interwoven with the main murder plot.

I'd seen this film before but couldn't remember anything about it. After it was finished I thought, yes, that was OK. But I've been thinking about it ever since. Not many films do that to me. Raymond Burr plays the villain so well and he only has a couple of lines in the whole film. It's just that hulking presence on film is enough.

Jimmy Stewart is one of my favourite actors from that era and he's great in this. That look he gives when he first start looking through the binoculars. He knows it's not right spying but like a car crash, he can't look away.
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