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Author Topic: How's everyone holding up?  (Read 4905 times)
Gant
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« Reply #60 on: May 01, 2020, 02:04:31 PM »

That’s cool to see KC
Satu.... I gotsta ask .. what is Body sugaring.. ?
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Christopher
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« Reply #61 on: May 01, 2020, 08:54:56 PM »

Satu, those are really good!

And that would be cool to see the original stuffed animals at the New York library!
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« Reply #62 on: May 01, 2020, 09:23:36 PM »

That’s cool to see KC
Satu.... I gotsta ask .. what is Body sugaring.. ?

Same as waxing, hair removal, technique a bit different.
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Matt
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« Reply #63 on: May 24, 2020, 01:10:13 PM »

How are things these days in NYC?

Is everyone back to work? How does everyone feel about the reopenings?

I've got mixed feelings. I understand people need to get back to work. The $1200 stimulus check isn't enough to force people to stay at home and not work, when there isn't rent/mortgage or even utility forgiveness. People need to feed their families. It's much more dire if you have kids to feed and no income, than it is to go back to work. Still, other countries have done a better job than the U.S. so that everything is put on hold until it's completely safe to reopen (which IMO won't be the case until there's a vaccine). So I'm watching the numbers like everyone else, waiting to see if they spike or not again. Here in TN, we've partially reopened and numbers did shoot up about 50% more than they had been. Still, I think TN has done a pretty good job of social distancing and glad we shut things down when we did. How are things in everyone else's area?

NOTE: I do not want this to go into a political discussion, and I'm not blaming any one person, more it's a failure of our entire capitalist society that we're not set up to take care of our citizens when there's a situation like this, and people have to choose between being at risk at their jobs, or safe at home but without food, utilities, etc. This isn't one politician's fault, and it's not one political party's fault. So I hope we can have this conversation without rearing off into politics and a blame game.
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Christopher
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« Reply #64 on: May 24, 2020, 04:15:30 PM »

All of my summer classes are online at least to begin with. I have one class that could meet again in the classroom in about a month (it'll start in about two weeks), but that could change. My other school is going to remain mostly online for the fall semester as well (except for the classes that require labs).

All the stores mark off spots to remind people to stay six feet apart, and I think for the most part people are following that. I have unfollowed a lot of people on facebook through all of this. ;) :D
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AKA23
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« Reply #65 on: May 24, 2020, 05:28:38 PM »

I'm still working 100% from home, and have been since the crisis began. Where I live, we haven't yet reopened. I leave every couple of weeks to get groceries, and am still not going out much at all beyond that. When I do leave, I wear a scarf.

I am doing this mostly to protect the elderly and the chronically ill from the virus, not to protect myself. However, I really do believe that for the average person who is under 60 years old, the fear of contracting COVID is way out of proportion to the likely harm. The vast majority of people who have COVID will recover from it fine. They will not be hospitalized. They will not die. A third of those with COVID do not even have any symptoms. If you are older, or you have people in your family who are older, or you have a compromised immune system due to cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or if you have serious lung issues, you are at risk and should be staying inside as much as possible. If you are outside of these high risk groups, it is prudent to wear a mask to protect others,  to wash your hands frequently, to avoid large gatherings such as concerts, etc, but other than that, you should not have a fear of COVID because it will likely not be that serious for you even if you do get it.

There are obviously going to be outliers. Someone can point to a guy with no chronic conditions at 40 who died, but these are outliers for a reason. They are extremely unlikely to happen on a per person basis. Children are also statistically unlikely to be seriously impacted by COVID. They have a much lower infection rate than adults and almost no children have died. There is a syndrome that appears to be quite rare that is causing rashes that can happen in children, but again, it doesn't appear to be a very common condition, so if you are a child, or have young children, I wouldn't worry out of proportion to the harm about them getting COVID.

I think the country as a whole, on a political and institutional level, and the medical system more broadly, should be taking COVID seriously, and we should all be trying to make precautions, mostly to protect others, but I wish that more people made decisions based on evidence and not based on irrational fears based on lack of knowledge and hysteria.

As for reopening, I think that that should be done on a regional basis rather than state by state, since there are areas of the countries that have very little COVID, and there are areas that are heavily impacted, and since people do travel to neighboring states, there needs to be a regional policy because if different governors within the same region make different decisions, they will not be able to control the spread of COVID in their states.
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AKA23
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« Reply #66 on: May 24, 2020, 05:28:58 PM »

The purpose of the lockdowns was sound. That was to avoid overwhelming the hospital system and to avoid running out of ventilators to treat hospitalized patients. It was never to prevent all deaths from COVID by shutting the country down indefinitely, since in medicine, that is never really possible. Even with the lockdowns in place, we've had almost 100K people die of COVID. Like most diseases, the burden of those deaths falls on the elderly, those who are chronically ill, or those with compromised immune systems.

I think it might be time to start thinking about reopening safely, with restrictions, because the country cannot handle 40 million people being unemployed, and that will continue unless reopening happens. These decisions should not be made on the basis of political considerations, but on evidence, and on balancing the harms that result from the shutdowns with the harms that will result from more people contracting COVID. The economic, personal, the mental health consequences, and yes, the loss of life that will result when the country opens back up. But, we have to remember, it is impossible to prevent all losses of life from COVID, and the country may never be completely safe from COVID. We cannot afford the personal or economic consequences of shutting the country down for 18 months while we wait for a vaccine that may, or may not, ever come.

I wish we were doing more to educate the population about who is at risk of being hospitalized from COVID, or dying, and encouraged those groups to quarantine themselves, but for the rest of the population, as long as you are not in an area where COVID is exploding, I think we should start allowing people to live more normal lives. I personally won't go to a restaurant or a movie theater anytime soon, but that does not mean that I wouldn't do other things. I am looking forward to the country starting to get back to normal because if we don't the costs in lives and in livelihoods will be worse than the actual consequences of COVID 19. If I were in charge of health policy in this country, I would be analyzing the hospital records of those who have been hospitalized from COVID. I'd use that data to develop risk profiles of the types of people who are likely to be hospitalized or die. I would then engage in a media campaign that educated the population on this, and would encourage those which the data show are likely to be hospitalized to protect themselves by quarantining themselves as much as possible. I would then encourage those who the data shows were likely not to need hospitalization to live more normal lives while employing social distancing safety precautions. I think that's the way forward.

I also agree with Matt that this crisis has really shone a very bright light on the fragile nature of our economic system. It is simply unacceptable for people who are not working for a few weeks to be completely unable to pay their bills, or that there is a vast disparity between the rich and the poor regarding who can access COVID 19 testing. We need a much stronger social safety net than we have in this country, and I hope that our political leaders learn that lesson so that we will be better prepared for the next crisis. The fact that millions of people in this country are one paycheck away from financial collapse is unacceptable.
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Matt
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« Reply #67 on: May 24, 2020, 06:28:01 PM »

I agree with everything AKA said.

(It's super hard to discuss lack of education about COVID19 without going into anything political. I feel our news coverage/education and politics are very intertwined)
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 06:31:17 PM by Matt » Logged
KC
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« Reply #68 on: May 24, 2020, 10:32:05 PM »

Just so you know ... in New York City almost nothing is open yet, though reopening may start in a couple of weeks. Governor Cuomo is allowing different parts of the state to open when they meet certain metrics, including having an adequate hospital capacity in case of a new surge, having adequate testing available and having enough contact tracers trained and ready to go. Several upstate regions have already hit the marks and are starting "Phase I" of the reopening. There are four phases. Through all of them officials have to keep a close watch on the metrics and be prepared to scale back in case of a greater-than-expected rise in the numbers. The reopening started on May 15, and apparently, so far, so good. But as I said, New York City isn't there yet.

AKA, that newly uncovered "syndrome that appears to be quite rare that is causing rashes that can happen in children" is a bit more alarming than that. It causes more than rashes ... several children have died, and others have been close to death. And we don't know that it's "quite rare," or if it's just that it's so newly recognized that few cases have come to light so far. At any rate, at its worst, it sounds like something no parent would want their child to go through even if it doesn't prove fatal; see this story for one teenager's experience: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/17/health/coronavirus-multisystem-fnflammatory-syndrome-children-teenagers.html

I agree that it's important to get things restarted, if it can be done carefully and with adequate planning and with adequate care to make it as safe as possible. We can't go on indefinitely with so many people deprived of a livelihood. Trying very hard to avoid politics here, but it's been pointed out that some European countries, instead of sending a one-time "stimulus check" and then handing out vast amounts of loans that were supposed to help small business so they could hire workers back when this is over (but in reality often went to large corporations in, shall we say, less than dire need of the money) ... instead of that, I say, some countries simply paid employers to go on paying their workers, so they didn't get laid off, didn't have to file for unemployment, and ... I was going to say, didn't lose their health insurance in the midst of a pandemic, but of course most European workers don't have to worry about that anyway.

What AKA is proposing sounds a bit like the Swedish approach. Alone among western European countries, they never had a full shutdown. Instead, those in the most susceptible groups were told to stay at home as much as possible, while the young and healthy more or less went about business as usual, with some precautions in place. With the result that they had a per capita death rate of something like three times what it was in the neighboring Scandinavian countries.

There are problems with the "Swedish approach" even if it worked better. How do you suppose it feels to be in a group that needs to be "quarantining itself as much as possible" while others go about business as usual? By the way, that would include both the presumed candidates for President this year. It also might include more people than you'd think; one report says that risk for hospitalization in case of infection jumps up at age 51 (thus including my state's governor). Many people in this age group are productively working and represent an important part of the economy. And even if they do want to "quarantine themselves," they still need things like food and medicine. It's not always that easy to arrange for everything to be brought to your door (in this city, some people were experiencing weekslong waits when trying to arrange to have groceries delivered).

Just my thoughts on this mess, as of tonight.
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AKA23
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« Reply #69 on: May 25, 2020, 05:10:18 AM »

Glad NY is following the evidence and doing a phased reopening, and I do think that Governor Cuomo is being thoughtful about this.

I think that what I'm talking about is similar to Sweden, but I don't think it's clear at all yet that Sweden had the right approach initially. Just because after months of quarantining we may have to start acting more like Sweden, it doesn't necessarily follow that their approach would have been best to respond to this crisis initially. Sweden's statistics are not crystal clear either. They do have a higher per capita death rate than neighboring countries, but they have a lower death rate than countries like Italy and Spain that imposed complete lockdowns. However, even Sweden's approach doesn't appear to have prevented the economic damage within their country that COVID has caused.

It is more likely than not, based on what we know now, that the syndrome in children is quite rare. Out of 5.4 million cases worldwide, there are statistically not many children with the inflammatory syndrome. It is likely with that many cases, if it were to be more common, we would have seen it in greater numbers by now, but KC is right that we don't know everything about that disease. Children have a 2% COVID infection rate. Out of 360,000 COVID cases in New York, 147 children have been found to have this inflammatory syndrome and, I think, 3 children have died, and like adults, the children that are struggling appear to have multiple underlying health conditions. Compare this to the personal and societal consequences of shutting all the schools down. Is this a proportional response?

I worry that the longer that NYC schools are shut down, the more poor kids are going to fall behind more affluent children or those from better educated families. Poor children already have a huge achievement gap when it comes to learning, and I don't think that poor children can afford to fall even further behind because of COVID. I have some friends who do come from more educated families, and even they say they are unable to teach their children during the lockdown and that many of them are simply not learning during this time, yet we've shut all the schools down when 98% of those who contract COVID are adults. Again, it is possible that the 2% of children could give the disease to adults that they live with, but when you balance that against the life-altering consequences of having no education in many parts of this country, which is the greater harm? Could we not keep the schools open, periodically test the staff, and isolate those who tested positive for COVID instead?

The inflammatory disease is serious and I agree with KC that if I were a parent, I wouldn't want my child to have it. Mentioning the rash was a reference point so that people would be able to quickly understand what I was referring to. It wasn't an attempt to minimize the seriousness of the condition itself.

These are really tough decisions, but I wish that in the media we were having these conversations, and we're really not. Showing an up to the second countdown on the screen 24 hours a day of how many people are contracting COVID and dying is not educating the public about the disease and weighing the consequences of our chosen response, and I think that's what we should be doing as a society.

The response to this crisis on the part of our leaders has not been good. They underestimated the scale of the crisis and therefore didn't plan for it. I hope we do better next time, and I agree that a lot of the money that has been spent hasn't stemmed the tide of the damage, and that it likely would have been better to make direct payments to vulnerable individuals for a longer period of time than it was to prop up large corporations who likely should have been able to secure other sources of funding to manage the economic impact of the crisis.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 05:20:51 AM by AKA23 » Logged
Matt
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« Reply #70 on: June 02, 2020, 12:13:38 AM »

One of my favorite podcast hosts recently put current events as this: It's like if you took the Spanish Flu, intersect it with the Great Depression, add in post-King Assassination level riots, add some Vietnam (or Iraq) war, and heap on a big dose of climate change. He forgot to mention the murder hornets. We've made it to June. Welcome to Level 6 of Jumangi.

We are living through historic times. It's tough to see our cities burning: Minneapolis, Washington, New York, Philly, Nashville, LA, Chicago, Atlanta, Portland, Louisville, and so many more. We've felt the hate growing for a decade now, and increasingly getting worse over the past few years. We've seen it on social media, and it's been hard and alarming to see such little ability to have discussions anymore without losing friendships just for having disagreements. In a nutshell, I'll just say there's too much hate in the world, and that breaks my heart. There's less faith and trust in our leaders, at every level of our government, and that's lead us here. And it's not looking like any of that is going to change any time soon.  Hope everyone here is holding up okay.
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Matt
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« Reply #71 on: July 11, 2020, 10:09:48 AM »

Check in and let us know how things are going where you live.

Nashville has spiked and we just broke a record for the most # of new COVID cases in one day. When traveling out of state, Tennesseeans in some states have to shelter in place for 14 days before going out in public. We finally have a mandatory mask order in place, so hopefully this will help. Meanwhile, according to headlines all over the country, I'm convinced the country has lost its mind and that hate and intolerance has eaten away at the our society to the point where we are no longer judged by who we are, but what we are, which cannot ever be changed.

Hope everyone is keeping positive and staying healthy.
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Matt
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« Reply #72 on: August 13, 2020, 07:58:17 AM »

My favorite quarantine jam so far -- this goes back to April, but I just saw it today.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/aQrR_bhCK1w" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/aQrR_bhCK1w</a>
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Gant
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« Reply #73 on: August 27, 2020, 11:34:20 PM »

Played my last gig here in London back in March... that feels so long ago. This is the longest I?ve ever gone without performing
and there?s still no sign of it returning... 
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KC
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« Reply #74 on: September 05, 2020, 09:36:33 PM »

A friend forwarded a bunch of Covid "humor" memes, most of which go back to the early days of the pandemic, when we could still see humor in it. I hadn't seen this one before now, however:

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Gant
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« Reply #75 on: September 06, 2020, 10:03:30 PM »

Lol... that?s cool.
I wonder what Clint?s up too... planning hard for future projects, or slipping easily into retirement.. the former I hope.   
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Gant
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« Reply #76 on: September 08, 2020, 10:43:08 PM »

Social gatherings indoors and outdoors over 6 to be banned in the Uk from Sept 14.
This will be enforced by the police.. and steep fines dished out to those that break the new rule..
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Matt
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« Reply #77 on: September 08, 2020, 11:05:19 PM »

Everything's opening up again here in TN -- indoor dining included. A friend of mine in PA when to a concert tonight at a local county fair.  I guess people got tired of there being a pandemic, so it's ... just not a thing anymore.   ::)

I can relate to the Clint meme.
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Gant
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« Reply #78 on: September 09, 2020, 12:58:29 AM »

We were opening up here but with a sharp rise in cases the government is imposing stricter restrictions again...
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Jed Cooper
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« Reply #79 on: September 09, 2020, 08:12:00 AM »

I began working in the office again this week.  Feels a little strange.  Doing Tues-Thurs on a trial basis for a while.  So far, so good. 

I hope you?re all doing well.

Take care and stay safe. 🙂


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