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Author Topic: Island of the Blue Tags (Look for your name here)  (Read 9057 times)
Matt
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« on: June 22, 2003, 09:45:39 PM »

These are all the unanswered tags from the "Tag, You're It!" thread HERE  

If you see your name here and you'd like to answer the question, that would be great!  But, no more tagging. :)



Agent: (From Lilly) Like me you've been gone from the board for a while, but maybe you'll see this... Most people dislike re-makes, but if you had to be involved in scriptwriting/directing a re-make of any Clint film, which would you choose, and why?  If you can, any brief thoughts on how you'd like to change the script, style or cast?

AKA23 - (From eustressor) In a parallel universe, Clint never took up directing. However, he did have the clout to pick and choose his projects, and to look for films that best suited the kinds of issues he wanted to address. Therefore, his filmography remained the same. What movie do you think would have suffered the most minus Clint as a director, and are there any you feel would have been better without him sitting in the Big Chair?

AKA: (from bcm) Instead of my other, unclear question: what is your least favorite Eastwood character, and why?

AKA: (From Christopher) What's your least favorite Eastwood movie? (I don't know if you've said, or if you have, I can't remember)

Aline: (From KC) Wonderful to see you here. What female character in an Eastwood film would you have liked to play? You can take into account the amount of screen time you'd have shared with Clint!

Allycat: (From Christopher) I recall asking you before what your favorite Eastwood movie was, so now: what's your least favorite Eastwood movie?

allycat (from bcm)
: on the old tag-game there was a question asked to Daisy, and you said you'd have liked to have that one. Well, here we go (I quote Matt): When looking over Easwtood's film career, do you feel, for the most part, that women are portrayed as strong or weak characters, and would you consider him a feminist filmmaker?

allycat: (From KC) You must know a lot about Hitchcock by now. Imagine one scene in an Eastwood-directed film were being directed by Hitchcock (same actors and script). What would he do differently?

BAGGIEB: (From Matt) We haven't seen much of you since the board move.  I hope you're still checking in on us from time to time, and hope you can join in more again soon.  For your question...  You are in an elevator, it stops on the third floor and Sondra Locke steps in and presses the button.  The next stop is over 20 floors away and you're the only two in the elevator.  What kind of conversation, if any, can you imagine you'd strike up?

BATARAD - (From maddog_frenzy)  What well-known persona, actor or otherwise, would you like to see cast in a movie with Clint, and why? If you're REALLY feeling frisky, name a genre (comedy, western, thriller, etc.) or title (even if it's a book that hasn't been movie-fied) of a movie they'd both be in, and what characters they'd play.


BCM: (From Christopher) Who is your least favorite character that Eastwood has played?

bdc28: (From Brendan) If Clint was approached to played Gil Grissom on CSI, and he accepted, do you think he would be as good as William Peterson?

bdc28: (From Matt) I miss reading your posts, not just all the fun ones that we all enjoy so much, but your great insightful thoughts on Eastwood's films too.  I was hoping to see you joining in when we started the Fistful of Dollars film discussion, since that's one of your favorites.  I know that time and computer access may be a problem for you, but if there was one Eastwood film that you'd want to discuss so badly that we might see you participating in the film discussions, which one would it be?  You know if we could get you to come around here more often, it would be the next film on the schedule!  

bigdai: (From dannyman891115)  What is your favorite Clint Eastwood western?

Cal - (From Brendan) What movie made in the 1990's do you think Clint would have been great for? (In a starring or supporting role)

Cal: (From jjgonski) What is your motivation for keeping this awesome web board going strong?

CalGal: (From Clyde) If you could show one Clint movie to someone who has never seen a Clint movie before,  which would it be and why?

CalGal: (From Doug) What is your favorite movie of Clint's since 1980?

Clintfan: (From Lilly)  I see you have an avatar from a favourite Clint scene of mine, from In The Line Of Fire. Is this your favourite Clint movie?  If yes, why?  If no, which movie is your favourite, and why?

Conan : (From AKA) What do you think is the best music in Eastwood's films?

Conan: (From KC) You've decided to train to run a marathon. Which character from an Eastwood movie (played by Clint, or someone else) would you like as a training partner?

Concorde: (From KC) Glad YOU'RE back! Which feat of marksmanship by an Eastwood character is your favorite? Do you think it would be possible in real life?

Concorde (From bcm): Since on the old board you were the gun expert, I'll ask you the same question I've asked D'ambrosia. What was first, your interest for guns, or your interest in Eastwood movies?

Concorde: (From Doug) What's your favorite "gun scene" in a non-western Clint movie?

Daisy Abigael: (From Ravenwind) What is your favorite fight in an Eastwood movie?

Daisy : (From AKA) Have you gotten to see Blood Work yet? What did you think of it?

Daisy: (From Brendan) If Clint had played any character in any of the Star Trek series or movies, whether it be a guest starring or starring role, which character do you think he could play?

Daisy: (From Doug) What's your favorite opening sequence to a Clint film?

D' Ambrosia: (From Conan) Who is the most cliche and cheesiest of all of Clint's characters?

D'amb (From Stranger)
You have a camera, you have 36 shots only, you can be present at any one scene from any one film to use these 36 shots, which scene would you use up your film?

DAmbrosia: (From KC) Interesting to hear about your background in the restaurant business. What food/eating/restaurant scene in Eastwood's movies is your favorite?

d'ambrosia: (From zoso)  if you were on the golf course with clint and in a tight match, would you let him win with that 5 foot gimme' or would you go for all the marbles?

D'Amb: (From mgk) Which of these characters would you most like the opportunity to play and why: a) Jasper 'Buddy' Noone (Jeff Daniels) in Blood Work. b) Jerry O'Neill (Donald Sutherland) in Space Cowboys. c) Hull Barret (Michael Moriarty) in Pale Rider. d) "Lasso" Leonard James (Sam Bottoms) in Bronco Billy.

Dannyman891115; (From Misty) You wrote a script, sent it to malpaso and BINGO! they sent you a letter back, sayiing that, not only they accepted your movie,but that clint will be the star, and you, yeah you, will be his co-star! Whats the story about, whats clint character like,and especially what is YOUR character like?And why?(In other words, if you were to play opposite clint, what kinda movie would it be?)

dannyman891115: (from Doug) How did you come to like Clint Eastwood?

DirtyDuffy45: (From mgk)  I just ran across this post of yours that shows that you like Eastwood's Pulovski character: "Since your talkin best performance, Im goin with the Rookie! You all know the character was perfect! Pulovski's the man! great performance!"  Is this accurate?  You really like Eastwood's Pulovski?  If so, what is it you like so much about him?

DOUG: (From Misty)Which Clint film, that he didnt direct, do you feel could have been even better if he had directed it and why?

Gant (from philo)  What do you think of the shorter version of Firefox , do you think Estwood was happy to reduce its length?

Gant (from bcm): What was it, about Firefox, that made you choose your name and avatar?

garyoperator: (From Misty) After reading your post in the "how complete is your clint collection" Thread, I can only assume/hope, that you own ALL the pre-dollars films. Which did you like the most and why?

Holden Pike: (From Philo) Is there any British film that you think Clint could have played a leading role in ?

Holden Pike: (From KC) We don't hear much from you lately ... ... It's easy to be disappointed after a film has been hyped too much in advance, but from what you've heard so far, are you looking forward to Mystic River? How do you think it will match up against the other fall releases?

Holden Pike: (From Conan) In the 1970s could Sam Peckinpah and Eastwood have come together to make a really good western?  Or could Peckinpah not get the most out of Eastwood?

Holden Pike: (From Doug) How do you think the movie Thunderbolt and Lightfoot  ranks against (or compares to) some of the great "buddy" action (action, western, etc.) films of the 1970's?

(More unanswered tags coming up...)
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Matt
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« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2003, 09:48:10 PM »

JJGONSKI: (From Misty) Is there a scene in an Eastwood film that gets you laughing every time you watch it, no matter how often you see it?

JOE- (From Skippy) What ce movie was the best one you watched? How did you become his fan?

JOEY: (from Matt) If you were in charge of picking five of Clint's movies for us to watch on the big screen at an Eastwood Web Board Convention, which five would you choose?

KC- (From Joey) You have a really thorough knowledge of all things Clint. Is there anything about Eastwood, the person, that surprised or shocked you? Something that you didn't expect from the man we idolise on the big screen? I hope that makes sense.

KC - (From eustressor) What's the most challenging aspect of being a CEDB moderator?  And last, this one's for all three - who'd win in a three-way cage match?

LICA - (From maddog_frenzy) If you could cast Clint in ANY movie (a real movie that's been done as opposed to a movie that doesn't yet exist) that is NOT a Clint flick, and as ANY character, which character would it be, and why? Take your time, your answer may have some fun implications and could stir debate...

Lilly: (From Brendan) If Clint only has ONE more acting movie left in him, what do you want the type of film to be?

Lilly: (From bcm)  Since you like to travel, I will ask you a question you have once asked Palm  . If you could take Clint to any place of the world for one day, where would you take him? And why?

Lilly: (From Philo)  In the film industry there is a lot of problems with copyright and clearence on material. It is possible that at one time or another Mr Eastwood has not been able to get a particular song that he has wanted for a certain scene. Choose a scene that could have a song added and add a suitable one. Don't worry the question is not needing anything serious, but your thoughts would be good.

LILLY: (From Misty) (watch out, weird question coming through) Ok, lets say clint died and would be reincarnated as an animal, which animal would you think would best suit his personality and why?

Lilly: (From Christopher) I don't know how familar you are to Eastwood's westerns, but which one is your favorite?

Lilly - (From eustressor) Name the Clint film where you feel the set design best served the movie, as in the scenery and sets really "take you there", so to speak.

Lilly: (From Conan) Replace the actor that played the bad guy (Scorpio) from "Dirty Harry" with another actor that could do an equal or better job.

LILLY: (From Matt)  Since you're a big In the Line of Fire fan, if you needed to come up with one thing about this film that could be changed to improve it, what would it be?

Lilly: (From KC) What male character in an Eastwood film can you imagine being played by a female, and who would you cast in the part?

little_bill - (From eustressor) What's your favorite Gene Hackman line in Unforgiven? Who does he say it to, in which scene, and why does it stand out to you?

little_bill: (from Brendan) Do you think Clint would have been good as Hannibal Smith in the A-Team? (if you cant decide, or never watched the A-Team all that much, pick another TV show where you think could have been good in.)

Lt. Briggs: (From Matt) You've met a lot of celebrities in your line of work... have you ever met Eastwood?  If you did, tell us about it.  If not, if the opportunity arose, what would you say to him?

MC: (From KC) Which Eastwood film do you think has the best ending?  Do you like one that sort of sums everything up or do you prefer an ending that makes you keep thinking long after you've finished the film?

MC: (From Matt) Clint sees the music video that you directed and meets with you to discuss working as a crewmember on his next film.  In the interview, he asks you to name some of the directors who have influenced you, and what it is about their styles that you admire.  Who would you name, and if you include Clint, what would you say to him that you admire about his directing?

mc Garrett (From Frank Morris)   - Your favourite Eastwood western and why?

MERIDICO: (From Matt) We haven't seen you around in a while, so thought I'd try to get you back here with a tag! Suppose you wanted to show an Eastwood film to a friend who doesn't think much of him as an actor, which film would you choose?

misty71 - (From Brendan) If you got the chance to play an extra in one of these movies: True Crime, Space Cowboys or Blood Work, which one would you pick? Why?

misty71: (From KC) You answered my question about getting a copy of a wardrobe item from an Eastwood film the way I probably would have ... by selecting a couple of items worn by Clint. (I've always liked that red-brown "Enforcer" jacket, as well ... ). I'll ask it again, with a twist ... You can have an exact copy of any wardrobe item worn by a female character from any Eastwood movie ... in your size. What would it be?

mkat71: (From dannyman891115) Which of Clint's movies would you have liked to co-star and why?

NATURAL BORN COWGIRL (NBC): (From Matt) Has BDC made you a big Eastwood fan yet?  Which Eastwood film did you enjoy the most?  Which the least?

Noose burn- (From Skippy) Why are you so interested in him.

nyna: (From Matt) What was the first Eastwood movie you saw, and was that the one that made you a fan?  If not, which one did it?

Orville: (From Frank Morris)  what is it about Clint Eastwood that makes him so special? What seperates him from all other actors?

Palm: (From Lilly) I know you're not much of a fan of Unforgiven, so I'm curious to know whether you aren't keen on Clint's western films in general, or just that one...which is your favourite of his westerns, and why?

PALM: (From Matt)  Where have you been?  Well let's see if we can get you back here on the board again!  I know that you love Robert and Francesca's relationship probably the best out of all of Eastwood's onscreen romances.  What would be your second choice?

raimius: (From KC) What do you think is the best jazz composition in an Eastwood film (whether or not it was composed for the film)?

Red: (From Christopher) Maybe you've answered a question like this before, but which movie does your name, Red, come from?

ropearoundhisneck: (from Frank Morris) Eastwood has many famous quotes. What quote did you like best and why?

skippy (From philo)  What is your favourite Eastwood poster image ?

stranger: (From Mr. Pants) Name the movies you have seen that Lee Van Cleef plays in. Do not have to be Eastwood movies

vik. (From zoso) which comedian, dead or alive, would you most like to see eastwood or could accept eastwood doing a buddy cop movie with?

Walt: (From Christopher) What's your favorite Eastwood movie?

XICHADO: (From Misty) Which is your favorite fight scene from a clint movie and why?

XICHADO: (From Misty) If you could re-do one of the stunts that's in a clint movie which would it be and why?

Xichado: (from mgk) What is your favorite scene in all of Eastwood's impressive list of films he has starred in, starred and directed, or even directed and not starred in?

Xichado: (From bcm) Who would you have voted off in the first round of the character survivor game? And why?

Xichado: (From KC) Glad to see you stick up for Blood Work. I liked it too, precisely for the kind of "visual poetry" moments you mentioned ... Eastwood's characters bear scars (physical, often psychological as well) in a lot of his movies. In films other than Blood Work, can you think of a scene involving a scar that you especially admire?

Xichado: (From KC)  I think I asked this of mgk in the old tag game, but I always like to hear your take on things ... what "weather" scene in an Eastwood movie (that is, a scene in which the weather plays a siginificant role) do you think is the most interesting or significant, and why?

Xichado (From bcm): (my fantasy isn't too good, so you get mgk's question-You are allowed (say by a leprechaun  ) to spend a one week holiday with a female character of your choice. Who do you choose, and why?) But you have to choose a male, non-Eastwood character

Zoso: (From Doug) What's your favorite Clint quote in any of his movies?
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2003, 11:42:53 AM »

vik. (From zoso) which comedian, dead or alive, would you most like to see eastwood or could accept eastwood doing a buddy cop movie with?

-- rowan atkinson - clint doing dirty harry and rowan atkinson as his sidekick - but rowan doing Mr. Bean - its alright i don't think that would happen - but rowan would be better than jeff daniels
« Last Edit: June 28, 2003, 12:42:58 AM by vik » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2003, 12:10:43 PM »

Thanks, vik...glad to see these "lost" tags answered.

But, don't tag anyone else.  We just wanted you to have an opportunity to answer those tags which you didn't have time to get to when they were originally posted.

So, don't forget -

No New Tags.
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Doug
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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2003, 12:14:17 PM »

Quote
DOUG: (From Misty)Which Clint film, that he didnt direct, do you feel could have been even better if he had directed it and why?


That's a hard question.  I think he could have done an equally brilliant job with Thunderbolt and Lightfoot, only because I think Cimino's style in that movie is very similar to Clint's.  So I think the final product would have looked very similar, but I think there would have been some "touches" added to the movie that might have improved it.  Ever so slightly.  Perhaps the same is true of Escape From Alcatraz.  Perhaps he would have improved it more.  Siegel was a craftsman, and the movie is quite solid, but I think Clint could have improved the artistry and look of the movie, and heightened some of the suspense, such as when Bull attacks him (in the shower and outside on the courtyard) and when Doc chops off his fingers.  I think Clint handles scenes like that exceptionally well, and those and a few others I think would have been a little better under his direction.  And the movie would probably have been about 10 minutes longer, which would be okay.  

But for the most part Clint has made the right decisions about who should direct his movies -- and twice when he was wrong he corrected those decisions.  (OLJW and Tightrope.)  So possibly some of his earlier movies would have been improved, most notably Hang 'Em High, but since he hadn't directed his first movie yet, that's being very presumptuous.    
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2003, 12:24:57 PM »

MC: (From Matt) Clint sees the music video that you directed and meets with you to discuss working as a crewmember on his next film.  In the interview, he asks you to name some of the directors who have influenced you, and what it is about their styles that you admire.  Who would you name, and if you include Clint, what would you say to him that you admire about his directing?

Great question, and one I'd certainly love to have to ponder for real!

Naturally, Clint would be at the top of such a list . I'd tell him I admire him for the laid-back atmosphere he creates on his sets and for his economical approach to filmmaking. Mostly, though, I'd tell him I admire him for his uncompromising, daring, and unconvential approach to directing.

I'm not sure how much Clint keeps up on current films, so it's tough to say how he'd feel about some of the names at the top of my "most influential" list -- directors like Sam Mendes, Darren Aronofsky, Neil Labute and Wes Anderson. Another influence, Spike Lee, probably wouldn't be too high on his list. Francis Ford Coppola is another name that would certainly be mentioned. Regardless, I think Eastwood would appreciate the fact that none of the directors on my list do big-budget comic books -- the types of films he seems to really dislike. I also think he'd appreciate my telling him that the things I admire about all these directors are attributes that they share with him -- a careful attention to all areas of filmmaking (cinematography, sound, writing, editing, etc.), and a fearlessness when it comes to bringing their vision to the big screen.

I'd also talk to Clint about some of the older classics I love, films like Double Indemnity, On The Waterfront, Citizen Kane, Casablanca, Psycho, etc. Assuming I had the time, I'd try to research and brush up on a few of the films that have most influenced Clint (The Ox-Bow Incident comes to mind) so I could discuss those films with him as well.

Last but not least, I'd definitely bring a screenplay (or at least an outline) with me that featured a fascinating character for Clint to play -- and an open invitation for Clint to be the first to sign on to the cast :)
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2003, 01:09:53 PM »

MC: (From mgk) Which Eastwood film do you think has the best ending?  Do you like one that sort of sums everything up or do you prefer an ending that makes you keep thinking long after you've finished the film?

Another great quesion! As a general rule, I definitely prefer "an ending that makes you keep thinking long after you've finished the film." Here are my six top contenders, leading up to my #1 pick:

6) Bird[/i]. If Clint had ended his film with the next-to-last shot -- a drum cymbal crashing to the floor, a perfect summation of Parker's tragic life -- this would have been a real contender. But since the film then limps home with footage from Parker's funeral procession, this is as high as it goes.

5) Dirty Harry[/i]. It doesn't get much better than a disgusted Harry tossing his badge into the water. Unfortunately, this powerhouse ending is muted ever so slightly by the knowledge that four sequels were still to come.

4) Unforgiven[/i]. My favorite Eastwood film (and arguably my favorite film, period), this might seem like an obvious choice. But while the closing word crawl is powerful, poignant and the perfect choice, it doesn't pack the visceral punch (at least for me) of my final three selections.

3) Thunderbolt and Lightfoot[/i]. After a series of close calls, Thunderbolt and Lightfoot finally get a lucky break and prepare to ride off with the money in hand. But before you can say "convential happy ending," the story takes a poignant -- and completly suprising -- turn that elevates the movie to an even higher level. Brilliant -- as is Bridges' and Eastwood's performance.

The final two are neck and neck, and I considered copping out and making them a tie. But I'll rank them with the disclaimer that they often change based on which one I've seen most recently.

2) A Perfect World[/i]. "I don't know nothing. Not one damn thing." Eastwood delivers these words with heartbreaking precision, and then a helicopter circles overhead to survey one last time the horrors we've witnessed -- as a haunting bagpipe number begins to play. As thought-provoking as they come, and an ending I've watched dozens of times.

1) White Hunter, Black Heart[/i]. "You're right. The ending is all wrong." But Clint (and few others) never got it more right than he did here, as a devastated John Wilson listens to African children scream and drums echo "white hunter, black heart" as a result of his careless, obsessive behavior. End a film with Eastwood slumped in a chair, weakly speaking the word "action"? Eastwood did, and it was one of his most daring, un-Hollywood moments as a director.
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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2003, 01:35:44 PM »

Great response MC.  8)
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2003, 08:13:28 PM »

Xichado: (From KC)  I think I asked this of mgk in the old tag game, but I always like to hear your take on things ... what "weather" scene in an Eastwood movie (that is, a scene in which the weather plays a siginificant role) do you think is the most interesting or significant, and why?

The first scene I thought about was the scene from Bridges when Francesca and Robert see each other for the last time. Since I know mgk is a big fan of Bridges I checked her answer and she mentioned the same scene and I fully agree with her

Quote from mgk:
Quote
However, the nod is going to go to The Bridges of Madison County as my answer to this question.  Seeing Robert drenched in rain while longing for Francesca to get out of that truck and come with him made his desperation and his loss of the woman he loved so dearly seem even more painful.  Without that rain and without the pathetic vision of him standing there, I don't think we would have felt the overwhelming sadness that we did.

But I remember another scene that I particularity like. It’s the scene from Bronco Billy -and by coincidence also involves rain and automobiles- when Bronco Billy and Doc are talking about the “financial issues” while driving in the pouring rain, and Doc tells Billy that they haven’t been paid in quite a while and that some members of the crew are thinking about leaving.

-Please correct me if I am describing the scene incorrectly, although Bronco Billy is my CE favorite movie I don’t own the video and I haven’t seen it in a while. ALSO, I have been waiting (ANXIOUSLY WAITING  :)) for the Bronco Billy Film Discussion in order to buy the film, since I am building my CE film collection accordingly to our Film Discussions, and I don’t want to devour the film before the discussion… and I am also terrible at describing scenes-

Back to the weather scene. Billy gets upset leaves his truck and in the middle of the pouring rain walks to the second truck and yells at the rest of his crew “Get off my truck” and he will ask his crew to take the decision to either stay with him or leave.

In Portugal, to express that “something” has no value, is worthless, cheap, meaningless we use the expression “having the same value as the price of rain” (or “I’ve seen buckets of rain water for a higher price”) and when I see this scene in Bronco Billy I think about this expression.

In a way –and from my point of view- Billy asks the others to tell him if everything they went thru together has absolutely no value, no meaning (like the price of rain, the rain that is falling) or if everything them went thru is enough to keep together –no matter what- and to go forward together –and in this case, I see the rain (water) as the source of life, as a fertilizer that makes “things” (friendship in this case) grow stronger.

They decide to stay and later on their friendship is, once again, put to a test –this time by fire- and, a little bit like phoenix, their friendship will rise from the ashes stronger and deeper.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2003, 08:27:46 PM by Xichado » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: June 23, 2003, 09:09:40 PM »

Xichado: (from mgk) What is your favorite scene in all of Eastwood's impressive list of films he has starred in, starred and directed, or even directed and not starred in?

Xichado: (From KC) Glad to see you stick up for Blood Work. I liked it too, precisely for the kind of "visual poetry" moments you mentioned ... Eastwood's characters bear scars (physical, often psychological as well) in a lot of his movies. In films other than Blood Work, can you think of a scene involving a scar that you especially admire?

I will have to give the same answer to these two tags.

I love the scene sequence –and see the psychological scar- from Unforgiven that starts with Munny shaving and looking out at his wife’s grave and then we see him walking towards her grave.

Sheer moments of poetry. Not a word is said but there is so much that is conveyed about the character in those few scenes.
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« Reply #10 on: June 23, 2003, 09:57:55 PM »

Xichado ... I thought I was the only one who loved that sequence. Did you recall that I selected the shaving scene myself as the answer to a tag similar to mgk's in our earlier game? You can read my answer ... here.

The shaving scene isn't in Peoples's script. I've always wondered whether Eastwood added it himself.
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« Reply #11 on: June 23, 2003, 09:58:53 PM »

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AKA23 - (From eustressor) In a parallel universe, Clint never took up directing. However, he did have the clout to pick and choose his projects, and to look for films that best suited the kinds of issues he wanted to address. Therefore, his filmography remained the same. What movie do you think would have suffered the most minus Clint as a director, and are there any you feel would have been better without him sitting in the Big Chair?

Matt, I've already answered this on page 25 of the tag thread. Nice to know you really take all my messages in, giving every important answer the consideration that it deserves...hehe ;) I'll repost my answer here:

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It's always tough for me to try to assess the influence of the director in a film. Who's to say how much of that influence is in the finished product of the film. I think as a lay person, and somebody who doesn't necessarily have a great conception of the duties of a director, the importance of a director to the overall feel of the film and the project in general, sometimes it seems as if I don't necessarily know what was the directorial touch that Eastwood added, the thing that was different, how much of the general aura of the film would be different had he not been a part of it. Sometimes it's impossible to discern these things until they aren't there and you realize, wait a minute, this doesn't feel like it should. I'm not used to it being done this way. This feels different than his other films. Unless you sense the ABSENCE of something that was there previously, it's difficult to assess what kind of an impact was made day to day and in the overall realization of the vision of a particular film. Does this make sense to you?

This being said, I think either Unforgiven or A Perfect World would probably have suffered the most without Clint as a director. In the case of Unforgiven , this was the film that led people to respect Eastwood more as a director, so you've got to acknowledge that the film was very well directed, and not only that, but that had Eastwood not been involved in the directing of this picture, it may have been very very different. It's possible that somebody else directing the film might not have had the same passion for the story, the same resolve to do it right, or the same vision with respect to the film. Another director might have tried to make the William Munny character more sympathetic, feeling that he was too amoral to connect with audiences who were looking for a more traditionalist western where the good guy triumphs over evil. Another director might have left the ending less ambiguous, might have included the homecoming scene, might have included a few scenes about Munny's past, might have given us more backgroud, more of a sense of who this person was before Claudia. Another director might not have had the sense to recognize the brilliance in David Webb People's script, might have changed it around, might have added too much, taken away too much. Another director might not have had the sense or the inclination to put on film what already worked as a script. In trying to improve on it, another director could have changed some of the things that made it work, making it worse, and not better. For all these reasons, and more, Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven in large part because it is just that, Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven . If it had been somebody else's [] Unforgiven [/I], if they had the opportunity to put forth their own vision, it could have been a very different film, having suffered greatly.

As you yourself have pointed out Eutressor, A Perfect World works in large part again because of Eastwood's part as director. A lot of it is highly stylized, some would say more than most of Clint's self-directed films, and for that reason alone, for that presence of an abundance of directorial touches here and there that combine together to contribute to this fully realized whole, the film would have suffered greatly without Clint as director. Not only this, but due to the co-starring role of Clint in this one, his role as director was far more important than his role as an actor. His impact on the production as director/producer far outshadowed, in my mind anyway, his role as an actor. It could be argued that a fair number of people COULD have possibly played the Red Garnett character, perhaps differently, perhaps not as well as Eastwood, but it can be argued that perhaps only Eastwood could have it realized in the way that he did as director. It can also be argued quite well that one of the strongest points of the film, the acting, was related to Eastwood's ability to get the most effective and the best performance out of both Kevin Costner and the little boy who played Philip. I don't think just anybody could have gotten those performances out of the actors. Just looking at Kevin Costner's range of performances, with a different director, we could have had a very different performance. Eastwood was able to get the best out of Costner. With another director, without that passion and that ability, who knows what we might have seen on the screen from principal actors in the film.

As far as films where it may have been better had Eastwood sat out on the directing, I can point to a few, but I don't know if the films would have actually been better without Eastwood as a director. I think they would have been different films. Whether or not that would have improved the quality of the film, or made it more enjoyable, that's very difficult to say. Eastwood has been criticized for the lackluster pace of a lot of his films, and two films where somebody else might have done it better, possibly, are both Absolute Power and True Crime . With the race against the clock story of True Crime I think a lot of people were expecting a faster paced, more suspenseful film. Both films were very slow paced, and may have benefited a bit had somebody picked up the pace a bit, injected a little more suspense and nail biting tension into the story. I think In the Line of Fire would have been a very different film had Eastwood directed it, and for some of these same reasons, it probably turned out better because Wolfgang Peterson was the director.

What do you think of these comments Eustressor? What do you agree with? What do you disagree with, and how would you answer the same question? Your question was quite loaded Eustressor, so I do hope that I've given it the time and the respect that it deserved. I did my best given the circumstances.

The other two questions are still unanswered, and will be answered at a later date in the near future, possibly tomorrow. Thanks for the list of unanswered tags, Matt. I know it must be hard to keep up with all these unaswered tags, going through all the pages, making sure you have everything right :)
« Last Edit: June 23, 2003, 09:59:51 PM by AKA23 » Logged
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« Reply #12 on: June 23, 2003, 11:06:39 PM »

[ANSWER to Question asked to me]

I would show The Outlaw Josey Wales or perhaps Escape from Alcatraz.  These are both good films that may make someone have a change of heart about Eastwood.  The best thing would be to find out what misconception the person had about Eastwood.  If they thought he was all Cop movies then I'd stay away from Dirty Harry series or the Gauntlet as an Introduction movie.  If they thought he was all Westerns then maybe Josey Wales wouldn't be the best choice.  Alcatraz seems to get anyone's attention with the whol plot of Jailbreak.  Then slowly introduce other films that shocase the best of Eastwood's acting coupled with the best plots.  That is what I would do to re-introduce the non-Eastwood fan to his work.

( Just a Side note - I had final Exams at College because I am on the Trimester system.. I had four long Term Papers to write as well.  That explains my absense.  Thanks for the note though.  I really appreciated it.  I hope to gte back into the discussions here.  You guys are all great.)
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« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2003, 04:22:55 AM »

Answer to why I like the character Nick Pulovski from The Rookie?

I think the character he portrays in this film is perfect for Clint.  I mean there have been many others that are so so but this ones brings him back to his DH roots.  He plays a beer drinking cigar smokin hard ass.  I dont know Ive liked the movie since the first time i've seen it.  The character just gets me.
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« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2003, 07:53:52 AM »

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Aline: (From KC) What female character in an Eastwood film would you have liked to play? You can take into account the amount of screen time you'd have shared with Clint!

Francesca Johnson.It must be good be alone and bored at home and a handsome guy comes up a and changes her life, even though for just some days  :)
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« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2003, 11:06:45 PM »

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BCM: (From Christopher) Who is your least favorite character that Eastwood has played?

Thanks Christopher for tagging me. My least favorite character I know so far must be Tom "Gunny" Highway. I hope we'll have some debate about him in the film discussion thread, when Heartbreak Ridge will be "on". Thanks for the game, you all  8)
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« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2003, 11:13:49 PM »

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Cal - (From Brendan) What movie made in the 1990's do you think Clint would have been great for? (In a starring or supporting role)

In honor of the man-with-no-name as a man-with-few-words, I'll keep my answers brief.  ;D

Even though the role was similar to one he had done many years ago, I would have enjoyed seeing Clint accepting the Clooney role in "Three Kings (1999)".

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Cal: (From jjgonski) What is your motivation for keeping this awesome web board going strong?

It's all of you that make it so strong, I'm just the dummy who built it.  ;)

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« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2003, 01:01:57 AM »

  Sorry if my answers are brief, as I'm in a bit of hurry.  But I want to answer these before the thread drops out of sight.

Conan : (From AKA) What do you think is the best music in Eastwood's films?

  All of the Dollars Trilogy, just amazing stuff from Morricone.  The only other instrumental soundtrack that come close is Basil Pouldouris from the Conan movies.  The jazz in the Harrys and the music at the very end of "Unforgiven" take honorable mentions.

Conan: (From KC) You've decided to train to run a marathon. Which character from an Eastwood movie (played by Clint, or someone else) would you like as a training partner?

  Eastwood's character from "The Eiger Sanction".  Philo is the man and deserves consideration, but a mountain climber wins this one.
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« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2003, 06:08:46 PM »

Misty,

       What scene in an Eastwood movie makes me laugh every time that I see it?  

Other than every scene in which Sondra Locke tries to "act"....most of the scenes in Dirty Harry.  I don't know why but I find it a rather amusing movie.  I think one part that I will always find amusing is at the end when Clint delivers his famous line of "Do you feel lucky?"  The look on Andy Robinson's face and then just the sadistic laugh just gets me going every time.  
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« Reply #19 on: June 29, 2003, 12:21:59 PM »

Hi bcm,

Thank you for the tags and I apologize for my late reply.

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Xichado: (my fantasy isn't too good, so you get mgk's question) But you have to choose a male, non-Eastwood character

First, let me tell you that I believe you are wrong or maybe being a little coy. Your imagination is very good, and I can prove it by pointing out your post on the Gauntlet’s Symbolism Thread (film discussion), that was very good. In a way it reminded me about all the symbolism in Orwell’s “Animal Farm”.


… or maybe you were sipping on good French wine when you were watching the Gauntlet for our movie discussion and the wine opened up your doors of perception (don’t take me seriously, I’m just kidding on this one :D ;))

There are a few male characters (not played by CE) that stand out and I really like. A few that come to mind are:

Tuco (in “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”)

Judge Fenton (in “Hang ‘em High”)

Lightfoot (in “Thunderbolt and Lightfoot”)

Mitch Leary (in “In the Line of Fire”)

These were all great characters and they were essential to the movie(s)’ storyline… and the actors that played them gave us great performances.

But I am going to be a “little” controversial here and I am going to choose Buddy Noone from Blood Work.

I watch the movie recently and it answered a few things that I didn’t quite understand or I didn’t pay enough attention when I watched it in the theater about a year ago. And I do like Buddy’s calm and calculated mind. He is McCaleb’s “following sea” boat… the one that is around and you have to be cautious about it.

I didn’t like Buddy that much when I first saw the movie, because I was expecting a serial killer within the lines of Scorpio or Mitch Leary, but…

(this is the scene after Terry McCaleb pays a visit to Bolotov, and both Terry McCaleb and Buddy Noone are at the FBI office talking with Jaye Winston)

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Jaye Winston: Lip reader is 90% certain that the shooter was saying happy valentine’s day.

Terry MacCaleb: Happy Valentine… well, that doesn’t sound like your average 3-strikes guys, does it?

Jaye Winston: What’s the average these days?

(McCaleb leaves the room)

Buddy Noone: Not much, man.

The mind of a serial killer is no longer a standard profile and Buddy doesn’t fit the standard that we got used to, he’s just a relaxed vagrant that is standing right below McCaleb’s nose and giving him clues on how to play the how-to-catch-a-serial-killer game. And that's the reason I like him.

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From KC,
Glad to see you stick up for Blood Work.

Anytime, I enjoy the movie  ;)
« Last Edit: June 29, 2003, 07:13:23 PM by Xichado » Logged

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