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Author Topic: EVERY WHICH WAY: Acting 1: Eastwood's Performance  (Read 7611 times)
KC
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« on: July 13, 2003, 09:39:02 PM »

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The script of Every Which Way but Loose had been around for a long time, rejected by everyone, Eastwood says. The script itself was dog-eared and food-stained. "Most sane men were skeptical about it; there were conflicts about it in my own group. They said it was dangerous. They said it's not you. I said, it is me. Nothing on the screen yet has been me. It's a left-handed compliment when people say, "That's him." If you make people think that, you've done a lot."
(Charles Champlin for The Los Angeles Times, 18 January 1981, 27. Reprinted in Clint Eastwood Interviews, p. 76.)

Eastwood was given the Every Which Way But Loose script by his secretary who had hoped he'd pass it on to Burt Reynolds to consider, but Eastwood liked it and decided to do it himself. What do you think of Eastwood's portrayal of Philo Beddoe? Do you feel the role suits him well? How do you think the film would have been different with Reynolds in the leading role?
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misty71
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2003, 11:13:16 AM »

I thik clint made a great move with EWWBL. He played the part so naturally, it made me think he could be that kind of guy in real life (maybe minus the orang-outang) he was funny and laid back, and you know, if there hadnt been an ape in the movie, I assume most people would see this as a natural move for Eastwood.
 But Clyde kinda gave the film some risk, you know "who wants to see clint starring with an ape" well obviously, a lot of people did.
 And I still do.

Awesome performance, really funny ;D two paws up!
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Matt
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2003, 08:06:24 PM »

I think Clint did a good job as Philo Beddoe, however, I can see Burt Reynolds doing the role--it's definitely in the same vein as Smoky and the Bandit and Cannonball Run.  But, I wouldn't like it nearly as much.  I just think Clint's a much more likeable person and that warmth comes across better than it does with Burt.  But, maybe I'm biased since I'm an Eastwood fan, and not a Reynolds fan by any stretch of the imagination.

As for how it would be different... well, I'm sure we'd have a totally different cast since Locke wouldn't be Lynn, half the Black Widows (or more) are Eastwood regulars, and Geoffrey Lewis and Walter Barnes wouldn't be in it either.  

And the soundtrack would be totally different too, since Eastwood had a hand in that as well.  

Even with all the differences, I bet it would have still been a hit with Reynolds, since his other films of this style were such enormous hits.  But I sure as hell wouldn't own it.  ;D
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2003, 08:41:15 PM »

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again.  Eastwoods best acting comes in the mid to late 70’s.  This movie is no exception.  Along with The Enforcer and The Gauntlet this stands to be, in my opinion, one of his best acting performances.   The moment you feel relaxed having fun calling the shots and making it happen is the day you can truly act yourself.  And that is one tough thing to do.   It was important for Clint to make this movie.  Not for the success but for his sanity.  If you go through that onslaught they call Hollywood doing everything someone tells you to do and not doing what you want to do your not going to last very long.  This is where Eastwood listened to everyone asking him why in the hell are you making this movie and him laughing all the way to the bank….  He mananged to tap into the American Sub-concise with that red-neck country-western thing that was happening to the Urban Cowboy of the late 70’s. I feel that it is one of his better acting performances…  

I don't think that Reynolds would have had the light-heartedness that Eastwood gives the roll.  He just would have sat there chewing his gum with his glassed over eyes the whole movie.  I did like Smokey and the Bandit and Cannonball Run, but the older Reynolds gets the more wiged out he gets... Have you seen those Macco ads on TV with him.  Weird Stuff...
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mgk
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« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2003, 06:24:37 PM »

I thought Eastwood's performance was excellent.  He seemed so relaxed and seemed to be truly enjoying himself.  And, it was a treat to see him in what seemed like a more comfortable role for him.  It made you feel like Eastwood could actually be this person at times in his private life....a person who has a really good sense of humor but also one who is very in tune to the feelings of others.
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mgk
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2003, 02:20:24 PM »

Thanks, everyone! This thread is now locked.  Please post any additional thoughts you have on this topic in the General Discussion forum.
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2013, 07:12:33 PM »

This topic has been temporarily unlocked.  Feel free to post any additional thoughts or discussion here.
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