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Author Topic: "No Name" films,...then who is Manco?  (Read 3602 times)
PCN
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« on: August 01, 2003, 11:58:58 AM »

Why are the 3 Leone westerns referred to as "The Man with No Name" movies when he is clearly called Manco several times in "For a Few Dollars More?"

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Brendan
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« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2003, 01:52:34 PM »

He was also called Joe in the first one, and Blondie in the third.

Think about that one.
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2003, 02:19:25 PM »

The name Manco literally means one handed, maimed, disabled.  After Chico's foot stomp of Joe's hand in FFD he does absolutely everything left handed.  Deals cards, Karate chops, holds binoculars, lights cigars, etc.  Everything that is except for shoot.  He still shoots right handed! (Leone adding to the mystic qualitys of him) It's safe to asume that he did not go by that prior to the foot stomp.  It's not his given name. More like a nickname.  

The name Joe in FFD is a kind of throw away name that the gravedigger gives him.  Kind of like Mac, Bud, Pal, or Dude.  The name Blondy in GBU is the nickname that Tuco gives him referring to his north of the border roots.  Although not actually blonde, he does have fair skin and lighter than Hispanic hair prompting Tuco to call him that.  Kind of like the term Gringo.  Hispanics saw the American mounted army Calvary troops, which wore green uniforms at the time, and referred to them as "Green Go".    

« Last Edit: August 01, 2003, 02:28:05 PM by DAmbrosia » Logged
Meridico
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« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2003, 04:34:04 PM »

I never noticed that left handed thing before, that is really cool.  I will have to watch for that next time I sit down to re-watch them.
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KC
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« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2003, 09:27:25 AM »

That's a great anwer, D'Amb, I couldn't have put it better myself!  ... However, it's not entirely certain that Eastwood is playing the same character in all three films. We've had some great discussions about that in the past! (Personally, I think it IS the same character, but it's certainly possible to argue the other side.)

One detail: on "gringo" ... I never heard that "military" explanation before ... This is what is says in (The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language:
Quote
grin·go

n. Offensive Slang pl. grin·gos
Used as a disparaging term for a foreigner in Latin America, especially an American or English person.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Spanish, foreign, foreign language, gibberish, probably alteration of griego, Greek, from Latin Graecus; see Greek.]
Word History: In Latin America the word gringo is an offensive term for a foreigner, particularly an American or English person. But the word existed in Spanish before this particular sense came into being. In fact, gringo may be an alteration of the word griego, the Spanish development of Latin Graecus, "Greek." Griego first meant "Greek, Grecian," as an adjective and "Greek, Greek language," as a noun. The saying "It's Greek to me" exists in Spanish, as it does in English, and helps us understand why griego came to mean "unintelligible language" and perhaps, by further extension of this idea, "stranger, that is, one who speaks a foreign language." The altered form gringo lost touch with Greek but has the senses "unintelligible language," "foreigner, especially an English person," and in Latin America, "North American or Britisher." Its first recorded English use (1849) is in John Woodhouse Audubon's Western Journal: "We were hooted and shouted at as we passed through, and called 'Gringoes.'"
(from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by the Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. © 1996-2002 yourDictionary.com, Inc. All Rights Reserved)
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2003, 09:38:00 AM »

We had always assumed that it was simply a Spanish word meaning "a pesky European settler," but once we looked into the matter, it turned out that things weren't quite so cut and dried.
After entering the phrase "gringo origin" into the Yahoo! search box and clicking on some of the web page matches, we uncovered a controversy over the word's history.
It seems that many amateur etymologists believe the term comes from a song sung by American frontiersmen ("Green Grow the Rushes" or possibly "Green Grow the Lilacs") during the Mexican-American War. You can find details of this theory at a page hosted by Clan Sinclair, along with the lyrics to both songs.
A second theory postulates that American troops, during that same war, wore green uniforms and were taunted with cries of "Green go!" Frankly, we found that one hard to swallow. Thankfully, most of the sites we consulted viewed this idea with a healthy dose of skepticism. --Taken from this site:http://ask.yahoo.com/ask/20000821.html

What's A "Gringo"?
When I first got down here (three years ago) someone told me very seriously that "gringo" means "thief" in Spanish.  Oh yeah?  Actually, the word is another one of those strange monikers like "Yankee" -- which was derived from the song "Yankee Doodle".  
Some people think it is a derrogatory term.  I think it may be, to some people.  I choose to believe that it is only perjorative when used with a adjective, as in " steenking gringo."  Belizeans don't do that, at least not to my face.
Where "Gringo" came from
There are various theories about where the term came from.  One encyclopedia suggests that it is derived from the spanish word for Greek -- as in "that's Greek to me."  I believe this story, which was related by Miz Hybarger, my fourth grade history teacher.
During the Mexican War (1846-48) the Yankee soldiers were singing a marching song called “Green Grow the Rushes”.  The Mexicans heard this marching song and started calling the Yankees “Gringos” because of the recurring word “Green Grow”.  (I've included the words to this song here.)  
Obviously, the word connotes the sum of experience that a stranger has with these Norte Americanos who come to visit and stay south of the border.  Sometimes that's good and sometimes it's bad, just like people everywhere.  -Taken From this site: http://www.belizenorth.com/gringo.htm

I stand corrected oh great one!  :-[ ;) ;D
« Last Edit: August 02, 2003, 09:43:00 AM by DAmbrosia » Logged
D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2003, 09:44:55 AM »

Maybe we ought to start a Gringo thread in the Off Topic Section KC! :D

-Just kidding... :)
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KC
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« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2003, 09:58:08 AM »

Popular etymology is a curious force, D'Amb ... Here's the rest of the article on Ask Yahoo! that you quoted from above:

Quote
One such site, a question-and-answer column called The Word Detective, offers a more compelling explanation of "gringo" and its origin. The detective says, "The most likely source of 'gringo' is the Spanish word 'gringo' itself, which means 'foreigner' or 'unintelligible gibberish.' The root of 'gringo,' in turn, is thought to have been 'griego,' Spanish for 'Greek,' often applied as slang to any foreigner."

Further research led us to conclude that this last theory is the most likely. The Word Wizard concurs wholeheartedly with the Word Detective, offering "griego" as the immediate root of "gringo."

Finally, we located a comprehensive article from Honduras This Week that outlines the long history of the term predating the Mexican-Amercian conflict. As far as we're concerned, it firmly places the far-fetched theories of overheard singing and anti-American sloganeering into the category of "urban myth," where they surely belong.


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