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Author Topic: High Plains Drifter: Was The Rape Scene Really Necessary  (Read 66310 times)
rr-electricangel
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« Reply #100 on: November 29, 2012, 05:04:05 PM »

I've watched this scene and would have to define it as either as a convoluted rape scene or as a scene of depravity. It's symbolic. Remember, Clint's character has the entire town painted red, and paints the word "HELL" on the "LAGO" sign just outside of town. Was it necessary? No. It cheapens the satisfaction of retribution sought by Clint's character in the rest of the movie. Retribution- is defined as punishment that is considered a moral right and fully deserved.  :D

Clint reflected on the film's meaning, indicating "it's just an allegory...a speculation on what happens when they go ahead and kill the sheriff and somebody comes back and calls the town's conscience to bear. There's always retribution for your deeds."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfnFF8VVbrw
« Last Edit: November 29, 2012, 05:46:44 PM by rr-electricangel » Logged

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Perry
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« Reply #101 on: January 23, 2013, 03:20:39 PM »


 Ironically Sergio Leone's 'Once Upon a Time In America's' rape scene's (Especially the one of Elizabeth's McGovern in the back of the car with DeNiro ) are far more brutal than HPD's. Talk about a totally unecessary scene.
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MakeItVin
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« Reply #102 on: June 22, 2013, 04:23:50 PM »

The movie came out WAY before political correctness started getting pushed upon us.  So in my humble opinion, yes, it was part of the movei so it was necessary.  Another excellent way to show the studliness of the main character.  She got what she wanted.  What else can you say?

Political correctness isn't even possible, anyway.
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Matt
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« Reply #103 on: March 17, 2016, 11:52:18 AM »


Also, if you think about it, a whipping is an excessive way to kill someone. As three killers you really dont have to make an example of the town by excessively beating someone over five or ten minutes. The fact that you have the heart to KILL the Marshall will put them on notice.

The whipping was personal.

I'm very tempted to add this to the more recent discussion we're having on High Plains Drifter for our Movie Night discussions, but I'm going to add it here because I think BDCs post needs the response.

I just watched it a few days ago, and I was wondering why they whipped Duncan to death, rather than just shoot him. They're gunfighters. They're hired killers... hired by the town, let's not forget. It's in the text of the movie... Duncan found out the mines were on government land and was going to turn them all in. It was going to end their livelihoods.  (Strangely we never see the mines or know anything about them other than that scene where they discuss why they killed Duncan.) 

Duncan couldn't be bought off. He was an honest sheriff. He was a good man in a corrupt town, and he planned to bring justice to the town. There wasn't an implication of a relationship with Callie, but moreso, there isn't any indication that Duncan would be the type to sleep with someone so dark-hearted and evil. He was one of the only good people in the town.

And it hit me as I was reading through this great great thread (thanks AGAIN to Xichado for bringing it over) what the reason for the whipping was. It wasn't personal, it was a statement. A shooting would have been too normal in a town like Lago. It wouldn't have gotten the attention that was needed. The town leaders who hired Stacey Bridges & the Carlin brothers wanted everyone to know THIS is what happens if you turn us in. They wanted to etch that killing in everyone's memory. They wanted everyone to be afraid:  don't go against us. Don't try to stop us. Just keep your nose down, and pretend you don't know a thing.

And that's all it was. A killing out of greed to silence a man who would have put an end to their profitable industry.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 08:25:00 PM by Matt » Logged
AKA23
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« Reply #104 on: March 19, 2016, 08:37:44 AM »

I agree with Matt. The whipping in front of the town, and its brutality, was meant to terrify anyone who might have thought of stepping out of line and exposing the town's crimes.

It won't surprise viewers of this thread, since I, you know, started this topic, that I still find the rape to be unnecessary. To me, it doesn't really add much to the movie, since the theme of The Stranger coming to punish the town is already so well developed. In many ways, I think the rape scene makes it harder to like and root for The Stranger character because I personally found the rape to be so disturbing. It was a very difficult scene for me to watch, even now, all these years later, and after many repeat viewings. But what I also found disturbing, and wasn't sure if I'd noticed it before, was how dismissive people were in the town about the rape. It just didn't seem like that big of a deal to most of the people. Like Matt, I was also disturbed by the fact that the women in the town seemed to still be so attracted to the Stranger. I know he was rugged and manly and all that, but he had raped a woman in the town. To me, that felt false, or was this reflective of the time? Was that dismissive attitude toward rape characteristic of the time?
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Matt
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« Reply #105 on: March 19, 2016, 09:04:28 AM »

Was that dismissive attitude toward rape characteristic of the time?

In some ways, it still is. Rape is still viewed as a crime based very much on the moral respectability of the victim. Think about it... if you rape a nun, you'd go to jail. If you rape a stripper, no one would do a thing. If you rape a single woman in her 20's who wore immodest clothing and dated a lot of men, good luck prosecuting. If you rape a 10 year old girl, you might get the death penalty. If you rape a 80 year old woman, the same.
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