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Author Topic: dad/son  (Read 1447 times)
shyson
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« on: November 11, 2003, 03:38:51 PM »

Did Eastwood approach already the relationship dad/son in his films? If Yes, How?

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Shyson
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Matt
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« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2003, 05:29:32 PM »

The only films in which Eastwood's character has a son are The Outlaw Josey Wales (and Little Josey is killed within the opening scenes) and Unforgiven.

However, there are a few films in Eastwood's canon that show Eastwood as a father figure to a younger man and do focus on the relationships between Eastwood and his figurative sons. The most prominent among these is Honkytonk Man, where the "son" is actually Eastwood's character's nephew, Hoss. Ironically, Hoss is played by Eastwood's true son, Kyle Eastwood.

Some other films where Eastwood plays a father figure are: Bronco Billy, Heartbreak Ridge, and A Perfect World.  Also, in The Outlaw Josey Wales, I'd consider the relationship between Josey and Jamie to be along the lines of a father/son relationship. And some might consider the relationships between Harry Callahan and his younger, inexperienced partners, and also Nick Pulovski's relationship to Ackerman in The Rookie to be along a father/son line.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2003, 05:31:26 PM by Matt » Logged
AKA23
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2003, 10:58:59 PM »

This is an interesting question. In response, I'd say that Matt has pretty much already covered very well most of the films, but it really does depend on your definition of what you see as a "father/son" subplot or relationship. I think the most explict father to child relationship is in Absolute Power. I realize that it's not a father/son relationship, but I think more than any of the other films it demonstrates the love that the father has for his daughter, the regrets that he's had over his treatement of his daughter and his role, or lack thereof, in her life. He very directly tries to protect her and keep her from harm, watches over her, and does whatever he can to make sure that she is safe. He even goes and fills her refrigerator with things to eat because she isn't eating properly, and he wants her to have the proper nutrition. I don't know if perhaps you were just unaware of this film or was specifically looking for a father/son relationship, but I thought in broadening the concept it would be helpful to note the father/daughter relationship.

Indirectly, and less explicitly, I think you can possibly make the case for a father/son relationship in White Hunter, Black Heart and High Plains Drifter to name a few. It's a much looser definition, but I do think that it's pretty clear that John Wilson is trying to explain to Pete his view and his philosophy on films and filmmaking in order to further develop Pete's own thinking. You might see it as more of a metor/mentee type relationship, and that I agree with, but I think it's clear that in certain parts of the film Wilson is trying to impart knowledge or teach Pete certain things about life and about the business, and this I do see as similar to a father/son relationship. In High Plains Drifter I think again loosely the Stranger plays a little bit like a father figure to Mordecai as well. He teaches him certain things, gives his positions of power and authority, paves the way for him to gain respectability in the town, and in the end, the "son" saves the "father" by keeping him from harm. I see a slightly different dynamic, but I think that these films and characters do point to a few examples where it would be helpful to broaden the discussion from a strictly father/son relationship and that these situations imply a similar relationship, if not explicitly so.
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AKA23
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2003, 03:48:10 PM »

Shyson, did you find my comments helpful at all? Does anybody else have any comments or have a reaction to anything that I've said? I thought this was an interesting topic.
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