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Author Topic: MAGNUM FORCE: Style & Technique 4. The Score  (Read 4889 times)
KC
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« on: December 28, 2003, 12:20:50 AM »

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Eisenstein came up with a very interesting concept: he was the first one who talked about 'audio-visual counterpoint.' If you start to think in those terms, then they should complement each other; the music should enhance, and add one more dimension to the film. But it shouldn't be obtrusive; it shouldn't interfere. And if the music is overpowering, or too good, or too interesting, you start to listen to the music, and you forget about the film. If the film is good, the music can make a great contribution--if it is good. And even if it's bad, if the film is good, it can survive. If it works well, the impact of the music is a subliminal one.
(Lalo Schifrin, from Crescendo International, vol. 15, no. 2, September 1976, 8-9, quoted in Clint Eastwood/Malpaso, by Fuensanta Plaza, p. 60)

What did you think of Schifrin's score for Magnum Force? Do you think his score accomplished what he says above? How do you like it in comparison to his score for Dirty Harry?
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Brendan
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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2003, 07:57:49 PM »

I still prefer the Dirty Harry score to this one, but the Magnum Force score was done well. I'm glad they got Lalo Schifrin back to conduct it. Who knows what would have happened if someone else came on board and tried to copy his style.  :-X
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Bronco_Billy
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« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2004, 09:28:15 AM »

Nice funky title track , The rest of the score is a mixed bag but most of it fits the style of the film . There's a little nod to the Dirty Harry score I noticed .


 

 
« Last Edit: January 20, 2004, 04:35:36 AM by Bill W » Logged
Agent
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2004, 02:09:06 PM »

Interesting comments by Schifrin, very insightful and very non-egotistical. Goes to show that what's important to him is how to add his share in producing a good film rather than drawing attention to himself and his talent, which he has every right to.

Unfortunately I've always felt the music - focusing more on the main score - has dated considerably, especially in comparison to Dirty Harry's. DH's theme seems timeless and perpetually modern, even after 30+ years. MF's score has always seemed more like a spooky' wailing' theme, with almost a sci-fi feeling to it. I guess it kind of fits with the subject matter of the movie (a badge-toting, horror 'death squad' who go on a righteous killing spree), but it's just not a very likable (or catchy)  tune, at least for me. However I do enjoy the brief interlude of the brass section near the end of the theme (I can relate since I played the trumpet all through my school years).  

*As a side note, I've always wondered if that's really Eastwood's hand holding that Magnum at the beginning.... 8)
« Last Edit: January 09, 2004, 02:14:46 PM by Agent » Logged

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KC
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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2004, 09:07:09 PM »

However I do enjoy the brief interlude of the brass section near the end of the theme (I can relate since I played the trumpet all through my school years).  
You too, Agent?  8)  ;)
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Agent
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2004, 09:03:03 AM »

Ah...so I take it you were a fellow horn player too, KC?  :)
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KC
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2004, 09:35:31 AM »

Nancy Turner and I won a Blue Ribbon in state competition (or maybe it was just regional, memory dims) for our trumpet duet ... on my own, best I could do was Red. ;)

But back on topic ... I agree with Schifrin, and so, obviously, does Eastwood, who has continued to follow this musical philosophy in his subsequent career. (I also agree with Agent that the Magnum Force score is less successful than Schifrin's score for Dirty Harry.)
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Christopher
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2004, 06:19:30 PM »

I was a trumpet and a tuba player myself ;) (though I didn't play during my high school years).

The score is pretty good in Magnum Force, though not as memorable as the Dirty Harry score.
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KC
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2004, 06:51:29 PM »

Chris, you, Agent, and I should get together sometime and play a trumpet trio! ;)
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Gant
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2004, 04:59:22 AM »

I love the main theme from Manum Force. Those drums are sooo funky.  8)   I guess it has dated in a way..tho' these days everyone is sampling from this era (and others) and it's retro feel is almost contemporary again.
I agree the DH score is better, more moody and totally fits that movie..however I like the MF score simply as a great piece of music... like I said.. Man those drums cook..... ;D
When I first picked up the soundtrack album nearly 20 years ago I spent ages trying to nail that pattern..... and failed  :-[ ;)
« Last Edit: January 11, 2004, 05:02:28 AM by Gant » Logged

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Agent
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« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2004, 10:38:21 AM »

I actually was going to mention that as well - the drum riffs, especially complementing the horns near the end of the song - but just left it out. But I agree, the drums do add to it. Bottom line is I think if they would have left out the wailing vocals it would have sounded much better.

Yes a trumpet trio sounds fun, KC....I'd be a little rusty however - I haven't put a horn to my lips in many years.... :-X. In my senior year we tied for first place in the Statewide high school (jazz band) competitions.

Kind of a side story (again), and this remotely relates to Magnum Force, or at least one of the stars. One of the numbers we played in the school jazz ensemble was the main theme for a popular TV show at that time - a show called "Vegas," in which Robert Urich played the main character. Didn't care much for that score, but I recall an interesting story concerning a particular day we played that.....but I'll leave that for some other time.
 :)
« Last Edit: January 12, 2004, 10:41:02 AM by Agent » Logged

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Matt
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« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2004, 06:04:48 AM »

Thanks to everyone for participating in this discussion. This topic is now closed, please post any additional thoughts in the Dirty Harry forum.
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2011, 08:54:05 PM »

This topic has been temporarily unlocked.  Feel free to post any additional thoughts or discussion here.
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2011, 11:41:28 PM »

Quote
Eisenstein came up with a very interesting concept: he was the first one who talked about 'audio-visual counterpoint.' If you start to think in those terms, then they should complement each other; the music should enhance, and add one more dimension to the film. But it shouldn't be obtrusive; it shouldn't interfere. And if the music is overpowering, or too good, or too interesting, you start to listen to the music, and you forget about the film. If the film is good, the music can make a great contribution--if it is good. And even if it's bad, if the film is good, it can survive. If it works well, the impact of the music is a subliminal one.

The only time I remember the music is over the opening titles, which was great so what it says above is true. The music isn't overbearing that it doesn't overpower you to miss what's happening on screen. It compliments the film well.
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