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Author Topic: A Question about Joe Kidd  (Read 5863 times)
translator
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« on: January 25, 2004, 03:03:51 AM »

I've never seen this film and I need to know what a line from the script refers to exactly.  The line is, "Now you got a one-loop outfit on Big Wash you work when you're not out huntin'."
Could someone please help me out here?  This is pretty urgent, so I'd really appreciate an answer ASAP.
Thanks.
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KC
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2004, 11:54:34 AM »

Hi, Translator, and welcome to the board. Are you translating the script for a foreign-language dubbed or subtitled version?  ???

I take it the term that puzzles you is "one-loop outfit." Frankly, I'm not sure what it means, exactly, either, but it refers to the small ranch Kidd owns, where he finds that Chama and his men have stolen his horses and taken his man Emilio up to the hills and left him tied up with barbed wire, in revenge for Kidd's having killed one of Chama's men in the melee in town. This is Kidd's motivation for joining Harlan's manhunt for Chama.

Perhaps someone who is familiar with Western "jargon" will see this and help you out. If not, you could just use some word that means "petty" or "insignificant" to describe the ranch.

This is what it looks like ... from a distance and close up.


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translator
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2004, 12:22:23 PM »

It's for Polish television, where they use voice-over narration in Polish, though you can still hear the original English dialogue.
I thought it meant "small" but I wanted to make sure.  Thanks for your help.
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KC
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2004, 12:37:33 PM »

One guess I had is that if "Big Wash" refers to a winding river or river plain, then "one-loop" could refer to a single "loop" of the river. But, it's just a guess.

Don't hesitate to ask again if you have more questions. We'll do the best we can, and I can post screen caps, if that will help. It must be hard to translate a movie script if you haven't seen the movie.
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translator
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2004, 12:50:54 PM »

Actually a buddy of mine's translating it.  I sometimes help him with the tougher American idioms and lingo he runs into in English-language films.  I specialize in translating Polish films and television programs.  I write English subtitles to Polish films on DVDs and weekly serials on the satellite channel, TVPolonia.
Once again, thanks for your help.
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vik
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2004, 12:58:16 PM »

« Last Edit: January 25, 2004, 01:00:27 PM by vik » Logged

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KC
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2004, 01:06:57 PM »

Vik, it clearly refers to his ranch. His holster is something he DOES work when he's out hunting!  ;)
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vik
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« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2004, 01:18:48 PM »

cool kc
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« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2004, 02:00:07 PM »

Maybe this term "one loop" is made up 20th century jargon for the cowboy movies.  Who knows, but the term may refer to the number of "loops", or ropes, worked by the cowboys when rounding up the cows.  Their is only one cowboy that uses a rope, hence, "one loop".

Totally a guess.....
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« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2004, 07:37:13 PM »

One cowboy = one loop? I guess that's as good a guess as any.  ???

I remembered that I do have a reference book that I thought might shed some light on this issue ... Wild and Wooly: an Encyclopedia of the Old West, by Denis McLoughlin. It's nearly 600 pages worth of invaluable information about Old West characters, locations and jargon ... but there is no entry for "one loop," or "loop," or "Big Wash," or for that matter even "outfit."  :-\
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robluvsnic
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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2004, 03:30:15 PM »

I doubt that I can be much help on this, but I would say that it seems fairly likely that the term "one-loop"serves to describe the size of the business. I.e. "outfit", I'm almost positive, means "operation" or "organization" in this context (i.e. the ranch as a business).

From the rest of the sentence, I'd say that "one loop outfit" means that it's a small business, or perhaps an under-staffed business, with maybe only one dedicated cowboy — hence "when you're not out huntin'", "you work". That's just a guess, though, since I don't remember this film very well, and so I'm not sure of the context.
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John Omohundro
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« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2004, 11:44:29 AM »

I'm not an expert on cowboy lore, but I read just about every Louis L'Amour novel I could get my hands on when I was younger. ;D
(That ought to count for something... :))

I don't recall exactly where I read it, but a "one-loop outfit" is, I believe, Western (cowboy) slang for a ranch that was small enough for one man to work on his own, or with a few hired hands to help him.

Also, while I originally thought that "the Big Wash" referred to the Wa$#!ta or Ouachita Rivers, I now realize that this isn't likely, as JOE KIDD takes place in New Mexico.

The Wa$#!ta River flows eastward for approximately 35 miles, from southeastern Roberts County, Texas, through southern Hemphill County, and enters Roger Mills County, Oklahoma.

Similarly, the Ouachita River begins in Camden, Arkansas, and flows in a more or less southerly direction for approximately 335 miles until it joins with the Tensas River near Jonesville, Lousiana, and becomes the Black River for the last 40 miles or so of its length, until it meets the Red River.

However, I did turn up something in WEBSTER'S NINTH NEW COLLEGIATE DICTIONARY[/i] . According to them, a "wash", in Western slang, is "the dry bed of a stream--called also dry wash".

Is it possible that the phrase "...the big wash...", used by Robert Duvall in the role of Frank Harlan, refers not to a specific body of water or area, but rather to the fact that Kidd's ranch is located in the vicinity of a large stream, or possibly a river, that has either been dry for quite some time, i.e., that only fills up during the rainy season (likely in a state such as New Mexico), or else that the aforementioned body of water has always been dry--that is, that it hasn't held water within the lifetimes of the current inhabitants of the area?

Just asking. :)
« Last Edit: March 04, 2004, 08:57:30 PM by John Omohundro » Logged
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