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Author Topic: What was wrong with Indio in FAFDM?  (Read 6092 times)
1861navycolt
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« on: April 01, 2004, 12:41:43 AM »

I am referring to his "sleepy" spells that occurred every so often.  I believe the first one was right after he killed the man who had put him in prison.  He leaned back and motioned for a cigarette and then basically passed out.  
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KC
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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2004, 01:03:55 AM »

Most observers assume that the cigarettes contain something a little stronger than tobacco ...  :o  ;)
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Gant
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« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2004, 06:32:30 AM »

They used to call em jazz cigarettes....  :o ;)
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MakeItVin
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2004, 08:23:34 PM »

I thought they were "reflections" back on something, like those flashbacks to the rape of his sister.  A heavy man must have heavy thoughts!!  Although, what better thing to do after shooting a man than fire up a jazz cigarette.....!!!
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John Omohundro
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2004, 03:20:55 PM »

MakeItVin:

Um, I believe the young lady who was raped and murdered in the flashbacks was COLONEL MORTIMER'S sister.

Remember the exchange at the end (please forgive me if I'm not dead-on with the quotations, as it's been quite a while since I last saw the film):

Manco: "There seems to be a resemblance."

Colonel Mortimer: "Naturally, between BROTHER AND SISTER."

Although the film didn't go into it, the novelization of FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE, by Joe Millard, hinted that Indio had somehow interrupted Colonel Mortimer's sister on her honeymoon. She'd liked his pocket watch so much that he'd commissioned the maker to build a duplicate, which he'd then given to her to give to his new brother-in-law (the young man killed by Indio in the flashback) as a wedding gift.

As we all saw in the film, she'd just given it to him when Indio burst in on them, and the rest is familiar to anyone who has seen the film.

Also: Regarding Indio's periods of "zoning out"-- I'm not a mental health expert, but I recall reading that certain forms of mental illness are prone to "fugue" states; that is, the afflicted individual enters a trancelike state in which he/she is unresponsive to most forms of external stimuli.

IIRC, Indio snapped out of his trance only when another member of his gang called his name, tapped him on the shoulder, or both. If so, he might have been suffering from such a condition.

--John Omohundro
« Last Edit: May 28, 2004, 03:43:22 PM by John Omohundro » Logged
Blondie2488
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2004, 07:06:58 PM »

I just thought he was stoned.
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KC
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2004, 07:33:14 PM »

I'm with Blondie on this one!  ;)

Thanks for catching MakeItVin's slipup on the identity of the victim, John ... and for filling us in about the watches from the novelization. Didn't she commit suicide, though, as Indio was raping her? I've always assumed he found that moment a bit ... distasteful, even for him.
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Doug
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2004, 10:46:21 PM »

I, too, figure he's getting stoned... yet, there's a perversity to it, as well.  I mean, I've seen people get stoned before, and they don't usually act like that.  There's something mental going on, too, almost like the recent act of killing someone with the effects of the drug is allowing him to feel his sorrow more deeply -- or more heavily, man.
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"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
John Omohundro
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« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2004, 01:39:59 PM »

KC:

You're right.

Colonel Mortimer's sister did commit suicide--with Indio's revolver, I believe. He made the mistake of leaving it where she could get her hands on it. (Personally, I've always wondered why she didn't shoot *HIM*, but I guess it's because the movie would have ended too quickly.  :D)

Also--In the novelization by Joe Millard (who also did novelizations of THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY, and A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS[/i]--his version was called A COFFIN FULL OF DOLLARS--as well as the Gene Hackman/Oliver Reed film THE HUNTING PARTY[/i] ), there was an monologue by Colonel Mortimer just prior to his final showdown with Indio. It went something like this:

"I see you still have the watch, Indio. Like it? Remember how you got it? Think back--it was ten years ago. You'd just gotten out of prison. There were two people in the house you picked to rob-- a young man, murdered by you on his honeymoon, and a young woman, ravaged and dead by her own hand on her wedding night. She liked my watch so much that I commissioned a duplicate for her to give her husband as a gift. You didn't give either one of them much time to enjoy it, did you?"

Of course, that explains Colonel Mortimer's motivation--REVENGE. For him, bounty hunting was merely a means to an end--he knew that, if he kept hunting criminals for a living, he'd eventually find the one he sought, unless someone else caught him first.

--John Omohundro
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Blondie2488
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« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2004, 03:29:38 PM »

What's the name of the novel GBU was based on? I'd like to read that. That Indio was a monster. Why did he shoot the guy at the begining of the movie who was in the cell with him?
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KC
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« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2004, 09:27:47 PM »

All three of Leone's Westerns starring Eastwood were made from original screenplays, not novels. However, as was the common practice at the time (it's still done to a certain extent), a writer was engaged to produce novelistic adaptations of these screenplays as tie-ins to the movies at the time of their U.S. release. That writer was Frank Chandler for A Fistful of Dollars, and Joe Millard for For a Few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. (I think John Omohundro, in his post above, has that detail wrong; Millard's A Coffin full of Dollars is actually an independent continuation of the series and isn't based on a movie script.)

There may be details in the books that were taken from the scripts they were based on, but got cut in the final release version of the movies, so they can be an important part of the documentary record.

They turn up on E-Bay from time to time, or you might find them for sale with the help of www.bookfinder.com .
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ScreamingEagle
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« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2004, 01:46:14 AM »

If I remember correctly, when reading 'Spaghetti Westerns'. Frayling says that Fistful of Dollars was based on Yojimbo, a japanese samurai film of the same director who did Seven Samurai, which was based on a story originating from america.
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John Omohundro
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« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2004, 08:25:49 AM »

KC:

Sorry about that. :(

To be honest, I didn't know about the novelization of A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS[/i].

I read the novelization of FOR A FEW DOLLARS MORE several years ago, and  A COFFIN FULL OF DOLLARS a few years before that, and I guess I just made an assumption. (First mistake. :))

Screaming Eagle: You're right. In addition to A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS (1964), Kurosawa's YOJIMBO (1961) was the inspiration for at least three other films that I know of--MAD MAX II: THE ROAD WARRIOR (1981), starring Mel Gibson; STEEL DAWN (1987), starring Patrick Swayze; and LAST MAN STANDING (1996), starring Bruce Willis.

Also, Kurosawa's other famous film, THE SEVEN SAMURAI[/i] (1954), has been the inspiration for several other films as well-- THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960) (and its sequels, RETURN OF THE SEVEN (1966), GUNS OF THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1969), and THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN RIDE! (1972)), as well as a short-lived TV series (THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1998)), and THE SEVEN MAGNIFICENT GLADIATORS[/i] (1983).

--John Omohundro
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KC
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« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2004, 10:06:46 AM »

ScreamingEagle is of course correct about the origin of A Fistful of Dollars in Kurosawa's Yojimbo (1961), as Eastwood recognized when he first read the screenplay; it was one reason he was willing to sign on for the project. He had seen and enjoyed the Kurosawa film, and thought at the time it would make a good Western, but no U.S. filmmaker would dare attempt it. In the finished Leone film, the resemblance to Yojimbo was so blatant that legal difficulties ensued, which was one reason that Fistful's release in the U.S. was delayed for three years. Kurosawa's film was very loosely based on, or inspired by, Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest (1929), whose protagonist, the Continental Op, is dubbed "the original Man With No Name" by Frayling (Spaghetti Westerns, p. 150). Leone claimed to have been more inspired by the 18th century Italian playwright Carlo Goldoni, whose comedy Il servitore di due padroni (The Servant of Two Masters, 1743) features a somewhat analogous plot (minus the bloodshed, of course).

At any rate, I should have qualified my statement that all three of Leone's Eastwood films were based on original screenplays. However, both For a Few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, as far as I know, have no such connections to previous films or novels.
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