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Author Topic: Quentin Tarantino  (Read 41171 times)
Conan
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« Reply #120 on: June 05, 2016, 03:53:16 PM »

I'm a fan of Tarantino.   Not sure if "Four Rooms" counts...The only one of his flicks that I really didn't like was "Jackie Brown".  "Pulp Fiction" is a classic, so many movies tried to rip off its style back in the 90s and even now.

My list:

1.   Pulp Fiction
2.   Kill Bill I and II
3.   Inglorious Basterds
4.   Reservoir Dogs
5.   Django Unchained
6.   The Hateful Eight
7.   Death Proof
8.   Jackie Brown
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KC
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« Reply #121 on: June 05, 2016, 05:28:00 PM »

In my opinion, your statement was inaccurate so I am just correcting the record. Clint did not support "Pulp Fiction" at Cannes, and from his comments, it sounds like he didn't even like it that much since he said "The Europeans seemed to like it" rather than that he thought it was a strong movie. Although it is possible that he may enjoy Tarantino movies, I am skeptical that he does since Clint doesn't make gratuitously violent movies and his style is subdued. Tarantino makes very flashy movies that are extremely violent, so for that reason, I doubt Clint is a big fan of Quentin Tarantino. A lot of people love his movies though, and that's all right with me. I was just giving Matt a little jazz since we are friends. Everyone has different tastes. That's what makes this board interesting.

I agree, AKA. Eastwood clearly did NOT support Pulp Fiction, and his position as president of the jury has nothing to do with it.
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Christopher
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« Reply #122 on: June 05, 2016, 06:34:09 PM »

I was reading a book about Wes Craven a long time ago, and remember a part where it mentioned Craven didn't like Tarantino's use of violence in his movies, mentioning Reservoir Dogs specifically. I enjoy a couple of Tarantino's movies, that one included, but it's interesting to think of how the violence is portrayed in various movies. (I've also read Tarantino say that he would have liked to have directed Scream because he didn't like the way it was directed :D). Tarantino's use of violence is over the top and comical at times, and I can see why not everyone would like that (I would rank Craven as a favorite filmmaker of mine, so you can imagine which stance on film violence I prefer). I remember writing on here about how uninteresting Kill Bill Vol 1 was to me, and how the violence in that movie didn't make me feel anything. The violence was... boring.

Outside of Jackie Brown, I can't think of many of his movies that I'd want to watch many times again (not that I've seen that one many times, but it's the one I'd most like to see again). And there's several I haven't seen yet that I'd check out sometime, like Inglorious Basterds, Django Unchained, and The Hateful Eight.

But honestly, most of the time I'd just rather check out the original movies that he's paying homage to. ;)

So I like the guy, but I couldn't be described as a big fan.
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KC
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« Reply #123 on: June 05, 2016, 07:18:06 PM »

But honestly, most of the time I'd just rather check out the original movies that he's paying homage to. ;)

That's the point with Tarantino, as far as I can see. He doesn't make movies ... he makes meta-movies. Movies about movies.
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Matt
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« Reply #124 on: June 05, 2016, 07:50:47 PM »

I don't really agree. There isn't all that much that's truly original anymore, anyway. As long as his movies are great entertainment (and they are), and have great acting, directing, screenplay, soundtrack, etc., then why NOT watch them?

Kill Bill is the only one of his movies where the film that he played homage was (in my mind) better than Tarantino's, and that's only because the original is my favorite movie of all time -- The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. But, then again... Kill Bill is also a 10/10 for me for films, and absolutely 100% worthwhile. So what if GBU is better, it's not a remake... it's a totally different film! Why not watch and enjoy both?
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Matt
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« Reply #125 on: June 05, 2016, 08:09:34 PM »

I need to watch Jackie Brown again ... it's been over ten years, and I'm guessing at its placement on my list.

I hope Quentin changes his mind, but since he's had this "ten movies" in his mind for a while now, and has been numbering them along the way, and has spoken about it in multiple interviews, he seems serious about it. He's still young and I hope if he does take some time away to do novels and work on stage, he'll return to films.

I'm already hoping he'll return, when he hasn't departed yet.   ::)



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Matt
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« Reply #126 on: June 05, 2016, 08:20:56 PM »

I remember writing on here about how uninteresting Kill Bill Vol 1 was to me, and how the violence in that movie didn't make me feel anything. The violence was... boring.

I'm sure I can find a post where I said this same thing 10-12 years ago, but the violence in Kill Bill wasn't meant to be violent. It was an homage to anime and the great martial arts films of the 70's. When O-Ren decapitates one of the men with her short sword, it's a fountain, which isn't supposed to really be comical, but it's not supposed to be gory - it's like anime. It was purposefully unrealistic so that the amount of death in that film (and there was a lot) wouldn't be too much to stomach.  So, the fact that you weren't upset by the violence... (do you know where I'm going with this).... is because of how good Quentin is.

On the other hand... did you feel anything for The Bride when she was buried alive and trying to get out of the coffin? That was powerful as hell. That was lasting, and I now actually want to be cremated because I never want to be in a box in the ground. The way that was filmed, the claustrophobic feeling of it was inCREDible.

The movie was powerful in so many ways, but the violence wasn't supposed to feel violent. It was FUN... it was supposed to be fun, and thrilling, exciting, and feel kickass, but it wasn't going for gore and slasher thrills.
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Matt
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« Reply #127 on: June 05, 2016, 08:29:05 PM »

I'm starting to feel like doing a Pulp Fiction, or some other Q.T. film movie night.  O0
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Christopher
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« Reply #128 on: June 05, 2016, 08:54:55 PM »

I don't mind fun, action-oriented violence either. That was the issue with Volume 1 for me--at the time when I watched it, and this has been a while back, I didn't feel anything at all for it. I liked Volume 2, in fact.

I saw Grindhouse at the theater, and enjoyed both Death Proof and Planet Terror. And Pulp Fiction is another I'd like to see again. Like I said, I've enjoyed his work, but not nearly as enthusiastically as a lot of others.
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Matt
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« Reply #129 on: June 07, 2016, 12:32:21 AM »

I just watched Jackie Brown again, and I moved it up a few notches. Really great movie.
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Doug
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« Reply #130 on: June 07, 2016, 02:41:32 AM »

I just watched Jackie Brown again, and I moved it up a few notches. Really great movie.

The thing about Jackie Brown is it gets better with each viewing. I never saw it in the cinema (because I hadn't really heard great things about it), but I did buy it on video when it came out, and the first time I watched it I didn't think too much of it. I ended up watching it twice more before the week was up and I never looked back. At some point it became my favorite Tarantino movie, and man, I've seen it a bunch of times. I seem to recall on one of the special features of the DVD Tarantino saying this was his hang out movie, meaning you watch it the first time to get the plot, but then afterward you can just watch it to hang out with these characters. And that's very true, i think, though I'd hardly want to hang out with any of them in real life, but it's a lot of fun in the movie realm.

I've long ago burned out on Pulp Fiction, but never have with Jackie.
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« Reply #131 on: June 07, 2016, 11:22:01 PM »

I really enjoyed Jackie Brown, I think it's easily one of Tarentino's best if not the best movie he's made tho I've enjoyed pretty much all of them along the way apart from the Kill Bills which bored the hell outta me...
I do agree that in recent times he could've done with tighter editing or someone on board advising him to cut back at times...

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Matt
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« Reply #132 on: August 24, 2019, 08:43:15 PM »

After rewatching all of these films again, here's how I'm ranking them today:

1. Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
2. Pulp Fiction
3. Kill Bill (Vol 1 & 2)
4. Reservoir Dogs
5. Inglourious Basterds
6. Jackie Brown
7. Django Unchained
8. The Hateful Eight
9. Death Proof
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« Reply #133 on: August 24, 2019, 09:37:19 PM »

You've really made me want to see Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. Unfortunately it's no longer playing very close to me, and I don't think I'll get a chance to see it in the next week anyway. Maybe Labor Day, if it's still around.
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AKA23
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« Reply #134 on: August 25, 2019, 11:59:12 AM »

I really hate Quentin Tarantino and his movies. I enjoyed parts of "Django Unchained," since it was kind of like a spaghetti western, and I enjoyed Ennio Morricone's score. But, once it turned into a blood bath, I hated it. Quentin Tarantino also frequently tends to make the same movie over and over again. Most of his movies are revenge fantasies, and a lot of them exploit historical events in really crude ways. Lots of unnecessary swearing, racial slurs, blood and gore. He does that over and over again. There is also absolutely no reason that his films need to have so much extreme violence, blood, and gore. There is no purpose to it, and it's not any more entertaining than it would have been if it had half as less of that. The stories would be exactly the same. Also, although I don't think that any one single individual can be held responsible for this, and Hollywood in general is not the main driver, if there was any director that has contributed to the glamorization of violence that has desensitized many young American males to the consequences of violence, and romanticized aggression, it's Quentin Tarantino. He has arguably been part of creating a culture that has led to more mass violence and shootings. In my opinion, no other director working today has so consistently glamorized extreme violence in our society.
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Matt
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« Reply #135 on: August 25, 2019, 01:51:36 PM »

Well, obviously Quentin Tarantino isn't your cup of tea. But, I'm not on board with your opinion that violence in movies creates violence in society. At least, not in the format we see in Tarantino films. These films are fantasy. They aren't even trying to mimic reality. If a film was going to be influential, I think it would have to be a more insidious message than what you get in these films. I like a shoot-'em-up violent film that's made well more than most people, I'll admit. But, I also have the most extreme anti-gun stance of anyone I know. I'm in probably the bottom half of one percent of people in this country that want ALL guns banned, and confiscated. But, I know that isn't going to ever happen. So you can see the difference. Entertainment is one thing, and reality is another.
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AKA23
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« Reply #136 on: August 25, 2019, 03:58:01 PM »

Well, since you are such a big fan, what purpose do you think the extreme violence serves? If the movie had half as much blood spirting everywhere and limbs being chopped off, and it had the same basic storyline and production values, wouldn't you enjoy it just as much? Or, am I wrong? Does he really need to go that far?

I don't think violence in movies creates violence in society. The Japanese play lots of ultra-violent video games too, just like Americans, and they don't have the mass violence we do (they also have extremely restrictive gun laws, to your point).  However, Japan also has a very homogenous society, with very little diversity, and a lot of social cohesion. The United States has none of that, and that can make a huge difference.

I do think that socially isolated, lonely young men who are often outcasts do tend to dissociate themselves from the consequences of their heinous actions. Some of them do play violent video games, and likely also gravitate to excessively violent movies. I think it's part of what fosters a more callous, more depersonalized personality, and those are exactly the kinds of people who later sometimes develop violent tendencies. I think it can make a difference in those who are susceptible to it, and probably doesn't in those who are not. It's a multi-factorial problem, but since we can't really predict in advance who is susceptible from who is not, it's a prudent thing to explore and be concerned about.

 
« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 04:06:46 PM by AKA23 » Logged
Matt
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« Reply #137 on: August 25, 2019, 07:01:01 PM »

Well, since you are such a big fan, what purpose do you think the extreme violence serves? If the movie had half as much blood spirting everywhere and limbs being chopped off, and it had the same basic storyline and production values, wouldn't you enjoy it just as much? Or, am I wrong? Does he really need to go that far?

It serves to entertain. And I don't feel the violence is "extreme". I think you're thinking of Kill Bill with the scene where The Bride takes on the Crazy 88 with one Hattori Hanzo sword, since that's probably where the most "blood spirting" happens in a Tarantino film:



But it's done in an over-the-top style. It never feels real. It's like it's right out of the pages of a comic book. The characters are like comic book heroes and villains. When a limb is cut off anywhere in the film, the blood shoots high into the air like a fire hydrant to make it even less realistic. There are little jokes interspersed with the action. I can't imagine watching the scene and concentrating on the violence instead of thoroughly enjoying it.

But, if we look at a scene in Pulp Fiction, the violence feels more real.  Tarantino's talents come into play by making you want the hero to destroy the villain(s).  When Bruce Willis is going through the pawn shop to find a weapon to use on the piece of $#!t rapists, who's not rooting when he picks up the sword and heads down to the cellar.



Is that supposed to feel "too violent"?  It's entertainment. Anything less, and I'm not going to enjoy it as much. 

This discussion reminds me of an interview I saw with Tarantino where a woman reporter criticized the lack of lines for Margot Robbie in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (as if he's a sexist director, which is one of the craziest thing I've ever seen when he makes his women characters the hero of the film more times than not). He told the journalist that as the writer, he has the creative ability to decide exactly how many lines a character needs to have, and therefore, she has exactly the right amount of lines.  Now I'm just paraphrasing, but that's pretty close to the way he said it. In the same sense, as the writer and director, he chooses the right amount of violence. It's awesome entertainment.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 10:55:18 PM by Matt » Logged
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« Reply #138 on: August 25, 2019, 07:55:47 PM »

I'm currently re watching Kill Bill, just finished 1 gonna watch 2 today.. I never really got the Kill Bill films to be honest and I'm enjoying them more second time around all these years later...

Totally agree with your views in violence in his movies Matt..

I'm still reeling from how much I enjoyed OUATiH. I'm gonna say it.
I've enjoyed this the most of all his films and can't wait to see it again..
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« Reply #139 on: August 28, 2019, 01:48:17 AM »

So, all going to plan, I’m going to see Once Upon A Time In Hollywood on Monday. Just saw the run time of 161 minutes!! Going in with little expectations so we’ll see.
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