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Author Topic: Clint's Keep Fit Routine  (Read 32903 times)
Clintus
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« on: June 02, 2004, 09:56:04 AM »

Hi, there. Does anyone have any background info on what would be a typical workout routine for Clint? In addiiton, I am aware that he has always been a believer in meditation and wonder if any of our members have info on this as well.
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« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2004, 11:13:13 AM »

He lifts light weights and runs, and also takes his vitamins.  ;) I know that much.
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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2004, 11:21:40 AM »

Well, I know that Clint's healthier than me and I'm 54 years his junior! Now THAT's a depressing thought ;)

I posted this awhile back, but I can't seem to find the thread. I had to research the web to find it again, and finally did, so I will repost it here. It sheds some light on Clint's health, his exercise routine, and the like. I thought it was relevant to this discussion.

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Clint Eastwood relies on a rigorous exercise routine to fuel his performance as actor, director, composer, politician . . . and club owner
 By Jon Feld
 

CBI: IHRSA's 'Person of the Year,' Jack LaLanne, has said that you came to him for fitness advice when you were just 16 years of age. Is that when your involvement with fitness began?

Clint Eastwood: I've always been committed to an active and healthy lifestyle. I'm very interested in nutrition and exercise, and I work out regularly, and keep up with the latest equipment on the market. I did meet Jack when I was in my teens, but I never went to him specifically for advice. When he lived in Hollywood, I visited at his house, and I've seen his home gym. My wife, Dina, and I run into him occasionally and still exchange Christmas cards. I hope to be as fit as he is when I'm 88. Right now, I eat well, exercise a lot, and I'm a pretty happy guy—I feel like a man half my age.

CBI: Do you have a fitness role model today? Is there someone that you look to for advice on nutrition and exercise?

CE: I think Arnold Schwarzenegger has done a great job in the role model department. During my career, I've been very fortunate in that I've been able to work with the best—like Jack LaLanne, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and trainer Al Silvani. Currently, Mike Hamill, a fitness guru who's also a friend of mine, helps keep me in shape. But I don't look for a lot of advice, and I don't train with anyone else. I just keep grinding along, and take my cues from a lot of different people. It's fun to watch a younger generation coming along that has a real interest in fitness. Nationally, we still have a real problem with obesity, but there's definitely more interest in fitness these days—which is a great thing.

CBI: How often do you work out?

CE: I do something every day—from walking or running a little on the golf course, to really hitting it hard in the gym, doing cardio or lifting weights. I've always been interested in fitness; it's never been a fad thing with me. These days, I just make sure that I'm more consistent, more dedicated. As you get older, you have to keep at it more diligently.

CBI: If we were to visit your home gym, what sort of equipment would we find?

CE: I tend to make use of the same equipment in my home gym and for my club properties. I really like the new Star Trac equipment—the company has made a lot of advances. I also like Precor's elliptical units. For strength training, I prefer Strive's target loading systems for an intense time-efficient workout. And to balance things out, I use Apex Fitness equipment—it's very durable and low-maintenance.

CBI: Do you work out regularly at any particular club?

CE: No, there's no one club. I try to work out wherever I happen to be, but I prefer to work out at home or at the Mission Ranch inn. I enjoy the privacy of my own gym, and have fitness equipment at all of my houses. Too often, when you go into clubs today, you hear rock or rap music. When I work out, I'd rather put on jazz or blues—as loud as I want!

CBI: Exercise obviously helps you to maintain your appearance and keeps you feeling young. Does it do anything else for you?

CE: I try to meditate every day, and exercise is another form of meditation for me. It definitely keeps the endorphins flowing, but, at the same time, it also keeps me focused. I couldn't live without exercise.

CBI: Many of the roles that you've played have been very physical—e.g., in Any Which Way You Can and Any Which Way But Loose, in both of which you were a bare-knuckles fighter, and, more recently, in Space Cowboys. Did these films require any special training?

CE: I've always enjoyed specialty training for my film roles. Boxing legend Al Silvani, who worked with Rocky Graziano and Floyd Paterson, trained me for my fighting roles . . . The last real training I did was for Space Cowboys.

CBI: The New Yorker recently claimed that, at the age of 73, you can still bench-press 200 pounds. Can you?

CE: I don't lift to see how much I can lift anymore, but, back when I used to keep tabs on that sort of thing, I was able to bench press more than 300 pounds.

CBI: Golf is clearly one of your passions, and one of the reasons that you've invested in a number of golf properties. How often do you play, and how do you do out on the course?

CE: When I'm not working, I play golf several times a week. My average score is anywhere in the 80s—preferably in the low 80s.

CBI: Tell us something about your diet regimen. Do you make use of supplements?

CE: I take vitamins daily, but just the bare essentials—not what you'd call supplements. I try to stick to a vegan diet—heavy on fruit, vegetables, tofu, and other soy products. Sometimes, when I feel like it, I eat chicken, fish, or turkey, but no red meat, cheese, or fried foods. When I want a bite of something 'bad,' I'll steal something from my wife's plate.

CBI: So, you eat intelligently, exercise regularly, and play golf whenever you can—what sort of shape are you in?

CE: I'm about 6'4' and weigh around 205 pounds. My cholesterol is between 140 and 155, and my body fat is relatively low.

CBI: It seems that virtually everyone in Hollywood works out. What about performing makes it so essential to stay in shape?

CE: In Hollywood, appearance is critical to your livelihood, so you really have to stay in shape.

CBI: As you probably know, the federal government is beginning to take more of an interest in fitness, in part because more than 60% of all Americans are now overweight. Over the years, you've held several public offices—do you think promoting fitness is an appropriate role for government to play?

CE: I've always believed that people—all people—should have access to expert advice and quality equipment, and I've donated quite a few pieces of equipment to our local youth center. As far as I'm concerned, it would be great if the government promoted fitness more aggressively.

CBI: Many people may not know that, in addition to being an actor, director, composer, and occasional politician, you're also a club owner. What made you decide to get involved in the industry?

CE: I got into the business for two reasons: First, I had the right opportunities at the right time. But another major factor in my decision to become a club owner was the appeal of being able to do something to preserve a bit of the environment. I knew that we'd retain everything that was great about Pebble Beach (which Eastwood owns in partnership with Peter Ueberroth and Arnold Palmer) with low-impact, if any, development. The same was true with Tehama. The golf course follows the natural lay of the land in a beautiful way. We removed very few trees; in fact, we moved a few trees to make sure that they survived. Beyond those two principal reasons, I enjoy many other aspects of club ownership—from the wide open spaces to the health and fitness component.

CBI: You're also the owner of Carmel's historic Mission Ranch inn. How involved were you in the creation of its tennis and fitness facilities, and how important are they to the experience of its guests?

CE: I rebuilt Mission Ranch and equipped it as I would my own home—the facilities are just great. The tennis and fitness club is very popular with our members and guests.

CBI: Do you have a business philosophy? What do you expect from employees? And what do you demand for your customers?

CE: As far as our clientele is concerned, my philosophy is rather basic—great service, incredible cleanliness, and no price gouging. With respect to employees, I'm fortunate in that a lot of great people are involved in my businesses—my films, my restaurants, and my clubs. I tend to let them do their jobs, and avoid micromanaging them, and they tend to stick around for a long while.

CBI: You recently completed a movie based on the novel Mystic River, the Dennis Lehane thriller, and you've also purchased the film rights to the book First Man: A Life of Neil A. Armstrong. What can we expect to see from you next?

CE: I'm still working on the final touches on Mystic River. After that, I'm looking forward to taking some time off, and playing some more golf . . . but I'll still be working out.

http://cms.ihrsa.org/IHRSA/viewPage.cfm?pageId=1168
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Brendan
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« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2004, 11:41:23 AM »

Thanks AKA, that was a great read.  8) *sigh* I need to join a gym...  :'(
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Clintus
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« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2004, 12:42:18 PM »

Well, I know that Clint's healthier than me and I'm 54 years his junior! Now THAT's a depressing thought ;)

I posted this awhile back, but I can't seem to find the thread. I had to research the web to find it again, and finally did, so I will repost it here. It sheds some light on Clint's health, his exercise routine, and the like. I thought it was relevant to this discussion. http://cms.ihrsa.org/IHRSA/viewPage.cfm?pageId=1168
AKA that was everything I wanted to know.........I really appreciate you posting this item. Thanks.
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Clintus
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« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2004, 09:02:28 AM »

Great stuff AKA. Thanks, that was a real interesting read...
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« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2004, 11:52:42 AM »

Thanks for that Amir, I hadn't seen that before, though back when I was researching for my Clint dissertation, I was lucky enough to be sent old copies of magazines like 'Muscle & Fitness' from the 80s and 90s with Clint on the cover, which had interesting articles about his health and exercise regime. I think I still have them if anyone wants me to post some extracts, otherwise I'll leave the honours up to mgk as they were her magazines, copies of which she kindly sent to me :)

The past couple of months I have embarked on a real fitness routine and been going jogging every couple of nights. I have to say that part of my inspiration to do this has come from Clint :) I was also inspired to do it as I have a friend who had been training for the London marathon for the past 10 months. I thought I could always count on him to be the lazy, unfit, booze-addled one in our circle of friends, but since he's been putting me to shame this past year or so, I felt I had to do something about it...  ;)
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« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2004, 03:55:10 AM »

Thanks for that Amir, I hadn't seen that before, though back when I was researching for my Clint dissertation, I was lucky enough to be sent old copies of magazines like 'Muscle & Fitness' from the 80s and 90s with Clint on the cover, which had interesting articles about his health and exercise regime. I think I still have them if anyone wants me to post some extracts, otherwise I'll leave the honours up to mgk as they were her magazines, copies of which she kindly sent to me :)

The past couple of months I have embarked on a real fitness routine and been going jogging every couple of nights. I have to say that part of my inspiration to do this has come from Clint :) I was also inspired to do it as I have a friend who had been training for the London marathon for the past 10 months. I thought I could always count on him to be the lazy, unfit, booze-addled one in our circle of friends, but since he's been putting me to shame this past year or so, I felt I had to do something about it...  ;)
Hi, Allycat,
Could you please post the extracts from Muscle & Fitness you refer to? I'd be really interested in those>
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Clintus
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« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2004, 12:54:52 PM »

Sure thing Clintus!

These are edited extracts I have copied out, but I have included most of the text from the articles. I thought I might be able to find the articles online but Muscle & Fitness don't appear to put their back issues on the net.

Hope you find this interesting...

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Muscle & Fitness January 1988 – Article entitled ‘Make Your Day – With Exercise’

A daily run is part of Clint Eastwood’s personal fitness program and has been for a very long time – along with working out for an hour to an hour and a half each day with weights.
“I’ve been into physical activity all my life,” Clint says. “Back when I was a kid, I always preferred doing manual labor jobs during school breaks, and at various times I ended up working in a steel mill, as a hay baler and a lumberjack. I liked physical work and being outdoors.”
When Clint was drafted into the Army in the early 1950s and sent to Ford Ord, located not far from Carmel, he was assigned as a lifeguard, his job to fish soldiers who couldn’t make the swimming test out of the pool. Again, he had managed to get a physical job that allowed him to spend time outdoors.
“I’d always done muscle-training exercise,” Clint says, “things like chins, clips and calisthenics, but it was when I was in the Army that I discovered the weights – the kind of training you’d call bodybuilding today. I never wanted to build huge muscles and bulk up like a competitive bodybuilder, but I realized very quickly that the best way to keep your muscles strong, hard, and fit was with weight training. And once I got into weight training, I never gave it up.”
But the young Clint Eastwood was not simply into exercise and making his body look good – he was also into health, which wasn’t all that common in an era that saw the beginnings of franchised fast food and the TV dinner. Back then, paying too much attention to diet and nutrition could easily get you labeled a “health nut.” But early in the run of Rawhide, the Western series that gave him his first big break as an actor, Clint was quoted in TV Guide as saying: “Stay away from carbohydrates, especially rich desserts. Keep a scale in your bathroom. Get proper rest. Try to be optimistic. Eat fruits and raw vegetables. Take vitamins. Skip beverages loaded with sugars. Avoid alcohol in excess.”
Clint wasn’t just giving the kind of casual “celebrity advice” we hear so much of today. He was really describing his own lifestyle. Everything in moderation, nothing in excess. Some cardiovascular exercise, some muscle training. Eating healthy food (today his protein is mostly fish) and watching your weight. And exercise and attention to diet, Clint Eastwood believes, should be a lifetime habit, best begun when you are as young as possible.
“When I was growing up in the 30s and 40s,” he says, “kids were a lot more active than they are today. We didn’t have television, we certainly didn’t have computers, so you came home from school and then went out to play with the other kids in your neighborhood. You didn’t have to be a varsity athlete to get into a game of pickup basketball or football or to take a bat, ball and glove out to an empty lot for a game of flies-and-grounders.”
[W]orking out doesn’t just improve physical strength, it also promotes inner values such as character, discipline and self-worth – old-fashioned values, perhaps but ones he considers vitally important.
“One of the most important things in life,” Clint explains, “is feeling good about yourself. And when you’re in decent shape, when you like the way your body looks and feels and your energy levels are at their highest, it’s a lot easier to feel good about yourself.”
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« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2004, 12:58:39 PM »

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Muscle & Fitness – January 1991 – entitled ‘Clint Eastwood: The Ambassador of Fitness”

Caption: He may be starring in The Rookie, but when it comes to pumping iron, Dirty Harry is a pro!

What’s the word on that chiseled torso of actor/director Clint Eastwood, one of Hollywood’s favorite tough guys? Says a crew member on The Rookie, Eastwood’s new cop movie, “The boss is really buffed!”
“I remember working on The Dead Pool, Eastwood’s last Dirty Harry flick,” says a stagehand. “There’s this one scene in a weight room in which Clint curls 40-pound dumbbells, 40 reps at a time. I assumed he was using weights made of balsa wood. I nearly broke my back trying to pick up those puppies!”
Clint has spent nearly a lifetime lifting heavy objects. As a teenager, he preferred manual labor. He started lifting weights at 19, when weight training and bodybuilding were relegated to back-alley sweatshops with black-iron plates.
“It was all free-weight training back then,” Eastwood says from the set of The Rookie. “I liked lifting weights because I always felt good after a workout. I also liked to drink a lot of beer and I figured the lifting was a good way to stay in shape.”
In fact, Eastwood’s lean and muscular physique, 6’4” at 190 pounds, was compelling enough to put him on the cover of Muscle & Fitness a while back. Eastwood and Joe Weider, a giant in his own field, became friends several years ago after Joe donated a full line of Weider equipment to the Carmel Youth Centre – one of Eastwood’s pet projects during his stint as mayor.
Eastwood wanted to do something special for Joe in return. He had heard that Joe was thinking about getting into the health club business, so he offered to use the Weider name in one of his movies. When The Dead Pool required a scene in a weight room, Clint called it the Weider Fitness Center, giving the name international exposure through his film.
In spite of his tough on-screen image, Clint is surprisingly quiet and approachable in conversation. And he loves to talk about his personal training program. To put on muscle for The Rookie, Eastwood increased his weight training, decreased his cardiovascular workout, and followed a low-fat, high protein diet.
Instead of his usual 2-3 hour workout four days a week, Eastwood switched to a one hour a day, seven days a week routine. “One day I’ll go in and do an hour of just shoulders and arms,” he says. “The next day I’ll do an hour of back and chest. Next day legs. Them depending on my schedule, I’ll run or use the StairMaster or a computerized stationary bike.”
Eastwood, who usually trains by himself, rarely misses a workout. “When I’m working at night, I train during the day, and when I’m working days, I train at night,” he says. “After working all night tonight, for example, I’ll get to bed around 6 am, sleep until 3pm, and go straight to the gym. Then I’ll go back to work. I have a hell of a social life!”
But that’s his choice; fitness is a priority.
Is Eastwood as fit as he looks? “He is in superb condition,” says Dr Harry Demopoulos, his personal physician. “He never eats fat, he take his antioxidants faithfully, works out like a demon, and gets plenty of sleep, which is an area that is often neglected in a fitness program. When we pit him against a stress test machine, Clint wins. He has become almost superhuman. His strength is amazing.”
Eastwood’s bodyfat, says Demopoulos, is less than 10% based on an underwater-weighing analysis. “I’ve never carried much bodyfat,” says Eastwood, “but I’ve always been pretty good about watching my diet.”
Eastwood may be tough, but he still prefers the convenience of selectorized machines. He also has a good supply of free weights and a Smith machine. For his cardiovascular training, Clint uses the StairMaster 6000 or a computerized stationary bike. One portion of his four-car garage has been designed to hold all of his leg equipment, including a leg press and leg extension, a standing and seated leg curl, a calf machine and a squat rack.
At Eastwood’s Malpaso Productions, a small stucco cottage on the Warner Bros. studio lot, there’s another small gym that he sometimes uses for a quick workout during lunch. It features a line of Weider equipment, along with a computerized stationary bike, and air-hydraulic minicircuit machine called MAXX by Hydra Fitness, and a multi-station unit.

EASTWOOD’S DIET

Eastwood maintains a low-fat, high protein diet. He also pays close attention to his cholesterol levels (his father, a meat-and-potatoes man, died at an early age of cardiovascular disease). He consults with a nutritionist, but generally sticks to the following diet:

·   Fish (his main source of protein)
·   Pasta
·   Fruits and vegetables
·   No dairy products (he hasn’t had an egg in years)
·   No red meat (except for the occasional Dirty Harry burger at his restaurant, the Hog’s Breath Inn in Carmel.
·   Protein supplements
·   Amino acids
·   Vitamin supplements and antioxidants

« Last Edit: June 05, 2004, 12:59:28 PM by allycat » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2004, 02:37:16 PM »

The diet he has there seems pretty good... but no dairy?  ??? Not even yogurt? Eesh... I don't think I could live with out at least yogurt.
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« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2004, 11:08:39 AM »

Sure thing Clintus!

These are edited extracts I have copied out, but I have included most of the text from the articles. I thought I might be able to find the articles online but Muscle & Fitness don't appear to put their back issues on the net.

Hope you find this interesting...
Allycat,
Thanks for getting this article posted so quickly.....I really appreciate you taking the time to do this. It's really good and I enjoyed reading it. I owe you!!!
;D
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Clintus
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« Reply #12 on: June 06, 2004, 11:46:35 AM »

I agree.  Thanks for the information guys and gals. Interesting read. You guys know everything.  I bet you have spy cameras or private eyes working to get more information.  You leave no thread behind.
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« Reply #13 on: June 06, 2004, 11:51:59 AM »

A thread is a terrible thing to waste!  ;D
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AKA23
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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2004, 03:27:44 PM »

It's great that Clint is so healthy, and I too have enjoyed reading these articles. Thanks to Ally for posting the earlier articles from the 80's and early 90's. That was interesting information. At the same time, I think that some of this information needs to be put into perspective. It's pretty tough to eat a "mostly vegan diet." It seems from these articles that his diet may have gotten even more restrictive as he has gotten older because the article from 2003 states that Clint eats a mostly vegan diet and the other article had stated that he ate fish and other things for protein, but now that is only "occasionally." All I'm saying is that if you eat practically nothing, eating meat only "occassionally," if you haven't had an egg in years, then you don't eat dessert, you don't eat any dairy, so you don't eat ice cream either. If you exercise for hours a day, as the article stated that Clint did, and may still do, and if you eat that sparingly, of course you're going to be healthy. Some would say that that's quite a tradeoff between enjoying life and being so restrictive that many things are simply off limits to you most of the time. In addition, although Clint's father died when he was 63 of a heart attack, his mother is still alive in her 90's, and with a cholesterol as low as Clint's, it seems logical that he has very good genes and inherited more of his mother's protective genes than his father's poor ones. Some people can exercise all day long and eat like a bird and not have cholesterol levels anywhere near Clint's. Longevity is largely genetically determined, as well.

Not only that, but Clint doesn't appear to have lived a very stressful life, at least not recently. Yes, he works hard and juggles a lot of responsibility, but that is really only for a few months a year, and then he can go and do practically nothing if he so desires. I hear a lot of people saying that actors like Clint should just retire, but if you think about it logically, he already is semi-retired. He works when he wants, he doesn't work when he doesn't want, and when he does work, he only works for a short period, finishes the filming in a month or so, then does the post-production work, then he's done. He can then do absolutely nothing for six months or a year, or whatever period of time he desires, and then he can start on the next project. He doesn't have to work every single day for hours a day day in and day out. That kind of lifestyle by itself would lend somebody to have a healthier lifestlye. He also has loads of money that he can spend on these meals that can be cooked to his specifications and have everything exactly the way he would like it nutritionally. Most people don't have that luxury either.  

On another note, it would be interesting to know exactly what vitamins Clint takes and what kind of meditation he does and what exactly his exercise regimen consists of. These article do give us a good clue as to what it is that he does, but it's all very general. If certain things have worked so well for him, if it were me, I'd probably want to make that known to other people so that they would have a shot at enjoying the same benefits.  
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« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2004, 07:22:13 AM »

Code: [Select]
:)

Good morning from the American Midwest-USA:

   I consider myself a great fan of Clint Eastwood's but I have been slow on finding good information like this ....I just want to say thanks for sharing and I'm going to crank up my old Health Rider and get back on track again.....At 68, I know I'm in trouble after reading this.....Everything is in here that I need to know.....The no red meat thing will be tough, though......

   Thank you again, for sharing this wonderful information..
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AKA23
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« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2004, 02:11:09 PM »

No problem! I was glad to share this information! It's nice that you find it so useful and it's very good that you've become inspired to become more fit. At 68, I'm sure you've got quite a few good years left and can continue to derive health benefits from healthy eating and exercise for many years to come. I think that rather than view this as a blueprint for success, and feeling as if you have to do everything Clint does, it would be great to just take a few things and try to improve upon them gradually. Just exercising or combining exercise with a little bit healthier eating would probably provide many benefits. Not everyone could be happy doing exactly what Clint does, as it does appear very restrictive, at least to a casual observer, but incorporating some of his plan would be good. Everyone is different, too.

At the same time, the eating healthy game is more complicated than it seems. A lot of foods some people might find really healthy can be made really unhealthy depending on the way it is prepared. You'd probably think pasta would be a nice healthy way to go, right? Me too, but don't forget that those rich, heavy sauces that most pasta places prepare to make your pasta tasty are loaded with unhealthy things. Like salmon? Me too. Did you remember that apparently now it's high in mercury? Is it farmed or wild? If it's farmed, put that in the unhealthy for you column. How about some shrimp? That shouldn't be too bad for you, right? Wrong. Shrimp is loaded with cholesterol. Chicken is a nice healthy way to go, right? Well, that all depends, do you like your skin? Chicken with skin can contain as much saturated fat as those steaks we're told to avoid. It's becoming increasingly more difficult to eat healthy. Unless you eat like Clint, it seems to be a losing battle!

For me, I could probably give up red meat rather easily. I never really have liked steak, which a lot of people love, and would much prefer a nicely done fillet of fish to a nice, juicy steak. If somebody told me I had to eat only fish or chicken for the rest of my life, I could probably do it, but not everybody would be able to do that.

Nevertheless, I'm glad that some people are becoming inspired to lead a healthier life and I wish you the best with getting fit, 1936! :) I'd be interested to hear of your progress.
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« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2004, 08:51:13 PM »

AKA, can we try to keep this thread on topic, please? If you want to share nutrition tips with 1936ireckonso, can't you PM him? I don't think peoplewho click on a thread titled "Clint's Keep Fit Routine" are expecting to find half a page worth's of suggestions for healthy living straight from the mouth of AKA23 ...    ;)
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« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2005, 03:27:12 AM »


From Eastwood interview:

Clint Eastwood:  During my career, I've been very fortunate in that I've been able to work with the best—like Jack LaLanne, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and trainer Al Silvani.

What do you think Clint means when he says he has worked with Arnold Schwarzenegger?

WKC.
« Last Edit: December 30, 2005, 03:30:46 AM by wkc » Logged

Brendan
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go ahead... paint me.


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« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2005, 10:49:56 AM »

He worked out with him. Got nutrition tips, health tips, weight lifting advice and such.
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