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Clint's Keep Fit Routine

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Gant:
Great stuff AKA. Thanks, that was a real interesting read...

allycat:
Thanks for that Amir, I hadn't seen that before, though back when I was researching for my Clint dissertation, I was lucky enough to be sent old copies of magazines like 'Muscle & Fitness' from the 80s and 90s with Clint on the cover, which had interesting articles about his health and exercise regime. I think I still have them if anyone wants me to post some extracts, otherwise I'll leave the honours up to mgk as they were her magazines, copies of which she kindly sent to me :)

The past couple of months I have embarked on a real fitness routine and been going jogging every couple of nights. I have to say that part of my inspiration to do this has come from Clint :) I was also inspired to do it as I have a friend who had been training for the London marathon for the past 10 months. I thought I could always count on him to be the lazy, unfit, booze-addled one in our circle of friends, but since he's been putting me to shame this past year or so, I felt I had to do something about it...  ;)

Clintus:

--- Quote from: allycat on June 04, 2004, 11:52:42 AM ---Thanks for that Amir, I hadn't seen that before, though back when I was researching for my Clint dissertation, I was lucky enough to be sent old copies of magazines like 'Muscle & Fitness' from the 80s and 90s with Clint on the cover, which had interesting articles about his health and exercise regime. I think I still have them if anyone wants me to post some extracts, otherwise I'll leave the honours up to mgk as they were her magazines, copies of which she kindly sent to me :)

The past couple of months I have embarked on a real fitness routine and been going jogging every couple of nights. I have to say that part of my inspiration to do this has come from Clint :) I was also inspired to do it as I have a friend who had been training for the London marathon for the past 10 months. I thought I could always count on him to be the lazy, unfit, booze-addled one in our circle of friends, but since he's been putting me to shame this past year or so, I felt I had to do something about it...  ;)

--- End quote ---
Hi, Allycat,
Could you please post the extracts from Muscle & Fitness you refer to? I'd be really interested in those>

allycat:
Sure thing Clintus!

These are edited extracts I have copied out, but I have included most of the text from the articles. I thought I might be able to find the articles online but Muscle & Fitness don't appear to put their back issues on the net.

Hope you find this interesting...


--- Quote ---Muscle & Fitness January 1988 – Article entitled ‘Make Your Day – With Exercise’

A daily run is part of Clint Eastwood’s personal fitness program and has been for a very long time – along with working out for an hour to an hour and a half each day with weights.
“I’ve been into physical activity all my life,” Clint says. “Back when I was a kid, I always preferred doing manual labor jobs during school breaks, and at various times I ended up working in a steel mill, as a hay baler and a lumberjack. I liked physical work and being outdoors.”
When Clint was drafted into the Army in the early 1950s and sent to Ford Ord, located not far from Carmel, he was assigned as a lifeguard, his job to fish soldiers who couldn’t make the swimming test out of the pool. Again, he had managed to get a physical job that allowed him to spend time outdoors.
“I’d always done muscle-training exercise,” Clint says, “things like chins, clips and calisthenics, but it was when I was in the Army that I discovered the weights – the kind of training you’d call bodybuilding today. I never wanted to build huge muscles and bulk up like a competitive bodybuilder, but I realized very quickly that the best way to keep your muscles strong, hard, and fit was with weight training. And once I got into weight training, I never gave it up.”
But the young Clint Eastwood was not simply into exercise and making his body look good – he was also into health, which wasn’t all that common in an era that saw the beginnings of franchised fast food and the TV dinner. Back then, paying too much attention to diet and nutrition could easily get you labeled a “health nut.” But early in the run of Rawhide, the Western series that gave him his first big break as an actor, Clint was quoted in TV Guide as saying: “Stay away from carbohydrates, especially rich desserts. Keep a scale in your bathroom. Get proper rest. Try to be optimistic. Eat fruits and raw vegetables. Take vitamins. Skip beverages loaded with sugars. Avoid alcohol in excess.”
Clint wasn’t just giving the kind of casual “celebrity advice” we hear so much of today. He was really describing his own lifestyle. Everything in moderation, nothing in excess. Some cardiovascular exercise, some muscle training. Eating healthy food (today his protein is mostly fish) and watching your weight. And exercise and attention to diet, Clint Eastwood believes, should be a lifetime habit, best begun when you are as young as possible.
“When I was growing up in the 30s and 40s,” he says, “kids were a lot more active than they are today. We didn’t have television, we certainly didn’t have computers, so you came home from school and then went out to play with the other kids in your neighborhood. You didn’t have to be a varsity athlete to get into a game of pickup basketball or football or to take a bat, ball and glove out to an empty lot for a game of flies-and-grounders.”
[W]orking out doesn’t just improve physical strength, it also promotes inner values such as character, discipline and self-worth – old-fashioned values, perhaps but ones he considers vitally important.
“One of the most important things in life,” Clint explains, “is feeling good about yourself. And when you’re in decent shape, when you like the way your body looks and feels and your energy levels are at their highest, it’s a lot easier to feel good about yourself.”
--- End quote ---

allycat:

--- Quote ---Muscle & Fitness – January 1991 – entitled ‘Clint Eastwood: The Ambassador of Fitness”

Caption: He may be starring in The Rookie, but when it comes to pumping iron, Dirty Harry is a pro!

What’s the word on that chiseled torso of actor/director Clint Eastwood, one of Hollywood’s favorite tough guys? Says a crew member on The Rookie, Eastwood’s new cop movie, “The boss is really buffed!”
“I remember working on The Dead Pool, Eastwood’s last Dirty Harry flick,” says a stagehand. “There’s this one scene in a weight room in which Clint curls 40-pound dumbbells, 40 reps at a time. I assumed he was using weights made of balsa wood. I nearly broke my back trying to pick up those puppies!”
Clint has spent nearly a lifetime lifting heavy objects. As a teenager, he preferred manual labor. He started lifting weights at 19, when weight training and bodybuilding were relegated to back-alley sweatshops with black-iron plates.
“It was all free-weight training back then,” Eastwood says from the set of The Rookie. “I liked lifting weights because I always felt good after a workout. I also liked to drink a lot of beer and I figured the lifting was a good way to stay in shape.”
In fact, Eastwood’s lean and muscular physique, 6’4” at 190 pounds, was compelling enough to put him on the cover of Muscle & Fitness a while back. Eastwood and Joe Weider, a giant in his own field, became friends several years ago after Joe donated a full line of Weider equipment to the Carmel Youth Centre – one of Eastwood’s pet projects during his stint as mayor.
Eastwood wanted to do something special for Joe in return. He had heard that Joe was thinking about getting into the health club business, so he offered to use the Weider name in one of his movies. When The Dead Pool required a scene in a weight room, Clint called it the Weider Fitness Center, giving the name international exposure through his film.
In spite of his tough on-screen image, Clint is surprisingly quiet and approachable in conversation. And he loves to talk about his personal training program. To put on muscle for The Rookie, Eastwood increased his weight training, decreased his cardiovascular workout, and followed a low-fat, high protein diet.
Instead of his usual 2-3 hour workout four days a week, Eastwood switched to a one hour a day, seven days a week routine. “One day I’ll go in and do an hour of just shoulders and arms,” he says. “The next day I’ll do an hour of back and chest. Next day legs. Them depending on my schedule, I’ll run or use the StairMaster or a computerized stationary bike.”
Eastwood, who usually trains by himself, rarely misses a workout. “When I’m working at night, I train during the day, and when I’m working days, I train at night,” he says. “After working all night tonight, for example, I’ll get to bed around 6 am, sleep until 3pm, and go straight to the gym. Then I’ll go back to work. I have a hell of a social life!”
But that’s his choice; fitness is a priority.
Is Eastwood as fit as he looks? “He is in superb condition,” says Dr Harry Demopoulos, his personal physician. “He never eats fat, he take his antioxidants faithfully, works out like a demon, and gets plenty of sleep, which is an area that is often neglected in a fitness program. When we pit him against a stress test machine, Clint wins. He has become almost superhuman. His strength is amazing.”
Eastwood’s bodyfat, says Demopoulos, is less than 10% based on an underwater-weighing analysis. “I’ve never carried much bodyfat,” says Eastwood, “but I’ve always been pretty good about watching my diet.”
Eastwood may be tough, but he still prefers the convenience of selectorized machines. He also has a good supply of free weights and a Smith machine. For his cardiovascular training, Clint uses the StairMaster 6000 or a computerized stationary bike. One portion of his four-car garage has been designed to hold all of his leg equipment, including a leg press and leg extension, a standing and seated leg curl, a calf machine and a squat rack.
At Eastwood’s Malpaso Productions, a small stucco cottage on the Warner Bros. studio lot, there’s another small gym that he sometimes uses for a quick workout during lunch. It features a line of Weider equipment, along with a computerized stationary bike, and air-hydraulic minicircuit machine called MAXX by Hydra Fitness, and a multi-station unit.

EASTWOOD’S DIET

Eastwood maintains a low-fat, high protein diet. He also pays close attention to his cholesterol levels (his father, a meat-and-potatoes man, died at an early age of cardiovascular disease). He consults with a nutritionist, but generally sticks to the following diet:

·   Fish (his main source of protein)
·   Pasta
·   Fruits and vegetables
·   No dairy products (he hasn’t had an egg in years)
·   No red meat (except for the occasional Dirty Harry burger at his restaurant, the Hog’s Breath Inn in Carmel.
·   Protein supplements
·   Amino acids
·   Vitamin supplements and antioxidants
--- End quote ---

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