News: Now showing in theaters: CRY MACHO, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


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Author Topic: The Most Moving Eastwood Western Moment  (Read 32944 times)
bdc28
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« Reply #40 on: September 21, 2004, 06:36:57 AM »

Hmmm, not THE most emotional scene of the movie...but as far as subtleties go...I think its a good one.

THE GOOD THE BAD AND THE UGLY: The scene where Angel Eyes has Blondie brought into the camp after the severe beating Tuco took...and tells him that he is now his partner for the gold. Clint looks down on the floor and spots the blood on the floor, realizing from the freshness of the blood that its Tuco's.

After a diatribe about their partnership and plans, Blondie spins his gun to unnerve Angel Eyes, as if to say "Oh I know you dont think youre getting away with beating my friend, do you?"

Blondie for all the rotten things that happened between he and Tuco....had a weird affection for the little clown. Its why he gave him water to get thru the desert, why he took bullets out of his gun the night before (so he wouldnt have to hurt him), and why he shot him down from the noose. It always looked like he was going to completely double cross Tuco, but in a backhanded way he was watching over him thru the entire film.

That spin with the pistol and the slight smile, with the gleam in his eye...that said EVERYTHING.
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« Reply #41 on: September 21, 2004, 07:30:42 AM »

Blondie didn't give Tuco any water to get through the desert. I would have given him 1 canteen though.
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Philo Beddoe Jr
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« Reply #42 on: September 21, 2004, 01:34:11 PM »

Blondie for all the rotten things that happened between he and Tuco....had a weird affection for the little clown. Its why he gave him water to get thru the desert, why he took bullets out of his gun the night before (so he wouldnt have to hurt him), and why he shot him down from the noose. It always looked like he was going to completely double cross Tuco, but in a backhanded way he was watching over him thru the entire film.

yeh, and my previously mentioned scene leaving the monastary.  very good observation overall.  Wouldn't have been the film it is without that element.

WKC.
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« Reply #43 on: September 23, 2004, 07:13:13 AM »

Quote
LITTLE BILL:
I don't deserve this. To die like this. I was building a house.
 
MUNNY:
Deserve's got nothing to do with it.
 
LITTLE BILL:
I'll see you in hell, William Munny.
 
MUNNY:
(Cocks rifle) Yeah.

At first I didn't think Clint was gonna kill Little Bill. I thought he would have lowered his rifle, and walked out or something, because that is what usually happens in those kind of situtations. I was almost 100% positive that would have happened. But when ever he did shoot, I actually jumped out of my seat. I didn't see it coming. It freaked me out. I was thinking it over in my head. I just couldn't believe it :o :o. Then I came to the conclusion that he released all the anger he had kept up inside himself. What with his wife dying, Ned being tortured, knowing that by doing this he might be leaving his kids behind. When you think about it, it was a really moving scene.
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« Reply #44 on: November 06, 2004, 01:48:25 PM »

wkc, Matt and Hemlock already mentioned the scene where Blondie and Tuco leave the monastery, and mattyd brought up the scene right before when Tuco turns his back on his brother and walks away. The most emotional scene for me, though, would be before that when Tuco says to his brother, "I, Tuco Ramirez, brother of Brother Ramirez, will tell you something. You think you're better than I am. Where we came from, if one didn't want to die of poverty, one became a priest of a bandit. You chose your way, I chose mine. Mine was harder!" There's something about Tuco stepping out from behind his outlaw facade and showing some emotion and vulnerability that really works for me.
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1936ireckonso
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« Reply #45 on: November 14, 2004, 08:18:03 AM »

Code: [Select]
:)

  Good clear frosty November morning from the American Midwest-USA:

   When TEN BEARS says:

      "IT WILL BE LIFE"

  from THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES

   The entire exchange between both of them in such a dangerous situation.

    Nice subject..there are many other scenes that I was consumed by as well...

    Respectfully,
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« Reply #46 on: November 21, 2004, 11:35:46 AM »

I find two of the most touching scenes to be when Tuco is being interrogated by Angel Eyes and the prisoners are playing 'The Story of a Soldier'. Then the part where he acquires his serape (or poncho) and gives the dying soldier his cigar.
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jk
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« Reply #47 on: November 26, 2004, 09:07:52 PM »

Would appear most of the good ones are taken, so I'll pull one from Unforgiven. I was moved when Will shot and killed the sheriff. Not simply because of his seemingly well-deserved death, but because of his words "I was building a house." It wasn't just a "bad guy" who was killed now, it was a person.
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« Reply #48 on: November 26, 2004, 09:31:32 PM »

Yes, jk, but ... deserve's got nothing to do with it!
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« Reply #49 on: November 27, 2004, 10:29:14 PM »

ya, we all got it comin' ;)
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« Reply #50 on: November 28, 2004, 10:45:35 AM »

In GBU when Blondie gives the dying soldier his cigar. :'(

If we're talking about a moment that specifically involves Clint, I have to say that the above first sprang to mind. It's particularly moving because Clint doesn't say anything - and neither does the soldier. He's only a boy but you can see the fear and pain in his eyes. It was particularly moving when Clint looks away for a second, then looks back and the soldier has died, his last breath literally escaping from his lips with the smoke. When I think of 'the most moving Eastwood moment' I think of more sombre moments like this one. There are also some good scenes in Unforgiven like the ones that have already been mentioned. I also think the scene between Will and Delilah is very tender (where she offers him a 'free one' and humanises the 'cold-blooded killer' somewhat. I rewatched GBU and Unforgiven recently as I hadn't seen them for a while - watching Clint two days running is definitely a great way to fully appreciate him! :)
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« Reply #51 on: November 28, 2004, 11:06:43 AM »

ya - but you want truly clint try outlaw josey wales - he directed it

i always think in the spagetti westerns you are missing the true clint - personal opinion of course
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« Reply #52 on: November 28, 2004, 11:19:00 AM »

Well I know Clint's great in Josey. I have seen it! I haven't seen it for a long time though so that's why I'm waiting to comment on it until I've watched it again (then I'll participate in the Film Discussion thread at long last, too). I plan to watch it again in the next couple of days. Watch this space - or another one like it, soon! :)

P.S. in the Spaghetti Westerns Clint was at the beginning of his career - I think he definitely evolved over time as an actor, and then of course he became a director. But I enjoy both eras of Clint. The acting style is very different anyway. The Spaghetti Westerns call for a minimalist acting style. But sometimes actions speak louder than words - after all, Clint asked Leone if he could reduce the dialogue still further in GBU, isn't that right? (Looks for friendly moderator on the horizon to confirm such a fact)
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« Reply #53 on: November 28, 2004, 09:57:11 PM »

But sometimes actions speak louder than words - after all, Clint asked Leone if he could reduce the dialogue still further in GBU, isn't that right? (Looks for friendly moderator on the horizon to confirm such a fact)
Actually, it was A Fistful of Dollars ... here are a few quotes from various interviews, as reprinted in Clint Eastwood: Interviews:

(Ric Gentry's profile of Eastwood in Millimeter, 1980:)
Quote
"Originally [ Fistful ] was written with just pages of dialogue," [Eastwood] points out, "all of it explaining the background of the character. But I wanted to play it with an economy of dialogue and to build a whole feeling through attitude and movements. So I said to Sergio, 'Let's keep the mystery of the character and just allude to what happened in the past.' Sergio argued with me, though he did agree in a way, but it was just much harder for the Italian mentality to accept. They're just used to so much more exposition and I was throwing that out. Finally he accepted it, but then the producers thought something was really awry. They said, 'Christ, this guy isn't doing anything. He isn't saying anything. He doesn't even have a name! And that cigar is just sitting there burning.' They just didn't know what the hell was going on. But when they saw it all assembled, they realized what it was, and then how it went over on the public. The 'No Name' guy soon became a very imitated character."
(Clint Eastwood: Interviews, p. 67)

(Eastwood to David Thomson in Film Comment, 1984):
 
Quote
The character [in Fistful ] was written quite a bit different. I made it much more economical. Much less expository. He explained himself a lot in the screenplay. My theory to Sergio was, "I don't think you have to explain everything. Let the audience imagine with us." I'd sort of coerce him into going for it on that level, like a B picture. But he did go for it. He wasn't really coerced, he liked the style.

I think the producers of the film were a bit shocked. They didn't know what was going on. They said, "Jeez, this guy doesn't do anything, doesn't say anything, just stands there with the cigar." They were used to Italian films--Divorce Italian Style, flamboyant, a lot of things happening. But Sergio, he kinda stayed with it, and he embellished it as he went along over the three films.
(Clint Eastwood: Interviews, p. 91)

Eastwood interviewed by Tim Cahill, Rolling Stone, 1985):
Quote
You've said that in the original script, the Man with No Name shot off his mouth more than his gun.

The script was very expository, yeah. It was an outrageous story, and I thought there should be much more mystery to the person. I kept telling Sergio, "In a real A picture, you let the audience think along with the movie; in a B picture, you explain everything." That was my way of selling my point. For instance, there was a scene where he decides to save the woman and the child. She says, "Why are you doing this?" In the script he just goes on forever. He talks about his mother, all kinds of subplots that come out of nowhere, and it goes on and on and on. I thought that was not essential, so I just rewrote the scene the night before we shot it.

Okay, the woman asks, "Why are you doing this?" and he says …

"Because I knew someone like you once and there was nobody there to help."

So you managed to express ten pages of dialogue in a single sentence.

We left it oblique and let the audience wonder: "Now wait a minute, what happened?" You try to let people reach into the story, find things in it, choice little items that they enjoy. It's like finding something you've worked and hunted for, and it's much more enjoyable than having some explanation slapped into your face like a wet fish.
(Clint Eastwood: Interviews, p. 121)
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allycat
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« Reply #54 on: November 29, 2004, 10:36:35 AM »

Thanks KC! :D I still don't have that Interviews book, though your post has reminded me that I don't, so now I can ask for it for Christmas! Sometimes I wish I knew all these facts at the drop of a hat, but then we wouldn't need our dear moderators, would we? ;) (Well, not as much. As if such a thing could happen!)

So I presume that after Fistful, Leone had decided that Clint's character didn't need much dialogue in the subsequent films. For the sake of continuity it would make sense. Also did Leone envisage the Fistful trilogy as a trilogy when, or indeed after making the first one? I've read that one of the reasons Leone made a sequel to Fistful was because of the success of the original.
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« Reply #55 on: November 29, 2004, 07:21:00 PM »

I've read that one of the reasons Leone made a sequel to Fistful was because of the success of the original.
As far as I know, the success of Fistful was the only reason Leone made For a Few Dollars More. And, as we've discussed in several threads, it's not really a sequel, and the three "Dollars" films aren't really a trilogy.
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« Reply #56 on: November 30, 2004, 04:12:02 PM »

I knew you were going to say that! :) Of course, they have been marketed as a trilogy - and the fact that For a Few Dollars More was promoted with the tagline 'The Return of the Man With No Name' or something similar. But forgive my ignorance. It's sometimes difficult to think otherwise when the connection has been made so many times and when Clint's playing similar characters. It has been a while (until recently for GBU at least) since I've seen the 'trilogy' as well so perhaps you'll make allowances in this instance  ;)
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« Reply #57 on: November 30, 2004, 04:32:58 PM »

wkc, Matt and Hemlock already mentioned the scene where Blondie and Tuco leave the monastery, and mattyd brought up the scene right before when Tuco turns his back on his brother and walks away. The most emotional scene for me, though, would be before that when Tuco says to his brother, "I, Tuco Ramirez, brother of Brother Ramirez, will tell you something. You think you're better than I am. Where we came from, if one didn't want to die of poverty, one became a priest of a bandit. You chose your way, I chose mine. Mine was harder!" There's something about Tuco stepping out from behind his outlaw facade and showing some emotion and vulnerability that really works for me.

  This scene is underrated and its a little moving since you see that Tuco actually has some feelings.  The whole subplot of Tuco and his brother is interesting enough to deserve a little more than it got, though I can understand not wanting to add to an already long (for casual movie fans at least) flick.
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« Reply #58 on: December 03, 2004, 03:39:16 PM »

For me it will be this scene in The Outlaw Josey Wales, when Lone Watie sheds a tear when he discovers that Josey is leaving and may never return ...  :'(

The end of Josey Wales is kinda moving too ... the confrontation Wales / Fletcher ... when he pretends he doesn't recognize him and lets him go.

The end of High Plains Drifter with Mordecai who tells The Stranger "I never did know your name ..." and he goes "Yes, you do", and then he rides away and Mordecai says "Yes Sir, Captain." ... AND the music is just amazing.

Also the scene in Unforgiven "that's a hell af a thing killing a man. You take away all he's ever had, and all he's ever gonna have ...'
+ "we all have it comin', Kid."
Or the end when Will goes "you better bury Ned right or I'll come back and kill everyone of you sons of b*[email protected] !"

I like the ends / last scenes of Clint's westerns ... but I think it's pretty obvious now, ain't it ?  ;D
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« Reply #59 on: December 17, 2004, 11:57:06 AM »

I always found the final gunfight scene in a few dollars more when you here that second musical watch chime in and Clint gives Van Cleef his pistol.  He never really developed too many close friendships in his movies and I felt that act was rather touching.
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