News: Now showing in theaters: CRY MACHO, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


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Author Topic: Tag, you're it! #2 (Swell, another Eastwood game)  (Read 106376 times)
AKA23
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« Reply #120 on: January 20, 2003, 09:39:35 PM »

After reading MGK's response and some of the other recent comments about Absolute Power on the board, it seems to be the only film of Eastwood's that I really like a lot that nobody seems to like all that much. I remember placing it as a favorite among his, and I think I still would. I have reservations about the way that film was handled in the end, but other than that, I thought it was a great movie. The ending was poorly done in my opinion, but I liked the rest of that film. It was the first Eastwood film that I saw in theaters, and I remember really not liking it when I first saw it, so maybe the fact that I transformed my opinion of it later when I really didn't like it before has something to do with my love for it now.
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Conan
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« Reply #121 on: January 20, 2003, 09:40:58 PM »

Hmmm, two more tags and I'm running out of ideas.

AKA: In ONE word, describe Clint.  Only one word :)

MGK: Your have to show your class one Clint movie, what is it?
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AKA23
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« Reply #122 on: January 20, 2003, 10:31:04 PM »


AKA: What do you think Eastwood's funniest movie is?

None of Eastwood's films are an out and out comedy (except perhaps the orangutang flicks which I've never really cared for), and most of his films have a certain tongue and cheek comedy that I admire and appreciate. Humor is a bit of an overlooked quality that I think is really present in a lot of his films. Perhaps Bronco Billy is his closest to a comedy, so maybe I'd pick that one. If we're going for recent films, Space Cowboys has a lot of comic moments, and it may be Clint's funniest film.
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AKA23
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« Reply #123 on: January 20, 2003, 10:33:16 PM »


AKA: In ONE word, describe Clint.  Only one word :)

KC has already used "consummate" which fits perfectly and is probably what I would have used myself, but since I can't duplicate her answer, I'll have to think on that one and say "prolific." If I come up with something better later, I'll go ahead and post that but you're confining me to one word here! That's not easy! ;)
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mgk
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« Reply #124 on: January 20, 2003, 10:39:54 PM »

 :)
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MGK: Your have to show your class one Clint movie, what is it?


Conan, I used to teach fourth grade and, unless I go back to the 1950s, I don't think there's a single Eastwood movie I could show them.  So, I'll pretend that I'm teaching much older students but even that is hard.  Almost any Eastwood movie would require parents' permission but I think I would choose Bronco Billy. It's a fun movie about friends, "family", loyalty, and dreams and the students would really enjoy Leonard James' rope tricks, Bronco Billy McCoy's tricks on his horse, and the boys always enjoy anything that has to do with snakes. ::)

I owe one tag and will come back with one later.

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Matt
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« Reply #125 on: January 20, 2003, 11:11:48 PM »


Matt:

You are in school. You catch the eye of Clints' daughter, winking at you. Clint is your Teacher and the study is Anatomy. What will you do ;D

If Clint wasn't "Clint Eastwood" aka Dirty Harry, Man With No Name, etc...  if he was just a teacher, so what?   I'd take my chances with the Anatomy teacher and take out his daughter.   Besides, I've always been good with the parents. :)


Matt: What was is about Absolute Power that you didn't like? (I apologize if you've written about this before)

I don't think I've ever written about my thoughts on Absolute Power.   It's an "okay" film.  I'd place it toward the bottom of my Eastwood list, but not in there with the real stinkers.  I find it bland and average with nothing really striking or memorable about it.  There's a couple of good scenes... my favorite is probably the one with Luther and Seth in the cafeteria, both trying to outsmart each other and  I like the relationship angle with Luther and Kate, but those are about the only parts of the movie that I actually like.   I thought that Judy Davis as Gloria Russell was just awful, I almost cringe everytime she's on screen.   There's a lot of plot holes, mgk gave one in her post earlier today, another is that Walter Sullivan's gunman was in position to shoot Whitney at the restaurant, how did he know he was going to be there?   The ending was pretty bland too... it was a climax that didn't really happen.  They robbed the audience of the final conflict, so all we really have is the scene where Clint gives the letter opener to Sullivan, and after watching the whole movie... that just wasn't enough.

I agree with everything that mgk wrote in her post about Absolute Power, so I'll just say "ditto" to that, in addition to what I've written here.

Matt:  What is your favorite speech by Clint?  I'd say to qualify as a speech, it must have about five sentences or so.  Probably narrows it down. :)

Hmmm... is the "Do you feel lucky" scene five sentences or more?   That's a definite favorite.  Even though I've seen Dirty Harry a dozen times or more, I still almost always replay that scene because watching it once isn't enough.   HOWEVER...  as much as I love that one, this one is right up there... and since the "lucky" speech is such an obvious answer, I'll give this one instead.  It's really great, one of my favorite scenes in all of Eastwood, and it just happens to be a long monologue.  From In the Line of Fire:

Quote
FRANK HORRIGAN: You know something?  For years I've been listening to all these idiots on barstools with all their pet theories on Dallas.  How it was the Cubans, CIA or the white supremacists or the mob or whether there was one weapon or whether it was five.  None of that's meant too much to me.  But Leary, he questioned whether I had the guts to take that fatal bullet.  (Long pause as Frank visualizes the day, remember every detail... his voice weak and close to cracking) God that was a beautiful day.  The sun was out.  Been raining all morning, the air was—  The first shot, sounded like a firecracker.  I looked over I saw him, I could tell he was hit.  I don't know why I didn't react.  I should have reacted.  I should have been running flat out.  I just didn't believe it.  If only I reacted I could have taken that shot.  That would have been all right with me.
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« Reply #126 on: January 21, 2003, 12:22:24 AM »

DirtyDuffy45  What Eastwood film since Unforgiven have you liked the most?  Which the least?


well since Unforgiven I would have to say Ive enjoyed most all of clints films I would have to say the movie I liked the most would be between Bloodwork and In the line of Fire.  The movie Ive liked the least would have to be space cowboys.  I got no problems with it Ive just like the others better.

Hemlock- The film industry is going to remake GBU and FOD and FFDM you can choose whose playing the legendary man with no name so who do you pick?
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KC
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« Reply #127 on: January 21, 2003, 01:40:03 AM »

Here are my answers to the five tags I've had since Sunday ... I'll have to post my new questions later on Tuesday.


:) KC: If you were to take a driving tour of the United States to see some of the filming sites of Eastwood movies, which three would be at the top of your list to include?  And, why?
I hope I can "annex" Canada to the United States, because right at the top of my list would be the various sites in the vicinity of Brooks, Drumheller, and Longview, Alberta, where Unforgiven was filmed. Given my passion for Unforgiven, I don't think I need to say "why," but I'd add that the scenery looks spectacular enough to merit a visit in its own right. Second on my list would be San Francisco, because it's home not only to Dirty Harry but the whole "Harry" series ... and we have a good guide to specific sites in the original film at Movietours.com. Also, it's a city I'd like to visit anyway! Third would be the site of High Plains Drifter's "Lago," on the shores of Mono Lake, California ... because the film is a favorite of mine, and again because the scenery looks like it'd be worth a visit even without the movie. If I could make one more stop it would be in downtown Phoenix. I'd like to retrace that bus's route through the "Gauntlet."

Oh yes  ... and Carmel? Well, of course I'd like to go there, because of Misty, and because it's Clint's home town ... and also for a personal reason: My parents were married there. My mother always said it was the most beautiful place she had ever seen. So, it would definitely be a stop on my tour ... but I was just supposed to name my top three! ;)


KC

Which Eastwood film would you liked to have seen more times on the big screen and why?
I've never seen High Plains Drifter in a theater, so I'd have to say that would be my answer. I'd love to see it on a really big screen and in a packed house.


KC : Let's pretend for a moment that Clint Eastwood has come to you to provide him some advice on his recent court action against Patrick McGilligan. I know that you support the suit, but what would be your best argument to use in defense of Mr. Eastwood and against Mr. McGilligan? How would you approach that action to maximize the possibility of a victory for Mr. Eastwood.
Easy, I'd tell him, "Clint, I'm not a lawyer. Go out and hire the best team of lawyers you can find; they're the ones you should be asking for advice about this. When you want some advice on a baseball movie ... or who you should co-star with in a buddy movie ... or the best restaurants in Manhattan ... I'm available!"  ;)


KC: What is the hardest you have ever laughed during an Eastwood movie?  The time/place and particular scene.
Darned if I can remember laughing especially hard in any Eastwood movie, not the way I've laughed at some of those silly Abrahams-Zucker Airplane!-type spoofs, anyway. I think some parts of Unforgiven are terribly funny, but they're sad, too, and they make you think, and I don't laugh aloud at them. I can tell you that the biggest audience laugh I recall hearing while attending an Eastwood film in recent years came in True Crime ... during the scene with Bob Findley in Alan Mann's office. Matt just posted it in the "Favorite quotes and one-liners" thread ...
Quote
EVERETT: Damn it, Bob! Why don't you hit me in the fu<king face, will you?  I'll fall down, I'll bleed, I'll do all that. I deserve it. Then you can go home and hit your wife, 'cause she likes it.


KC:  If you had a choice, would you rather have a one-on-one interview with Clint for one hour or be allowed to sit on the set for a whole day of filming (with Clint directing and scheduled to act as well) but you won't be able to speak to him?  If you were allowed a longer interview or a longer time on the set, would that change your answer?
That's hard. I think I'd take the day on the set. In the first place, I'd be so tongue-tied if I actually had the chance to interview him that I doubt I could get a single question out. Then too ... I've read so many interviews with Eastwood, in the course of preparing the interview book and since, that I can't think of too many questions to ask him that he hasn't been asked already ... and I would hate to have to interview him and ask him only stuff he's heard before. On the other hand, I'd love to try to draw him out on Unforgiven, and I could think of a few new questions there  ... whether he thought of the title, was it he who did the minor rewriting and tightening of the script, how he got the idea to begin and end the film with the long shots of Munny, whether the shaving scene (not in Peoples's script) was his idea ... I don't know, it's too hard to choose! I guess, if I were interviewing him for a specific project, say the dream I have of a scholar's edition of Unforgiven, and I was sure he wanted to help out ... then I'd take the interview. If it was "just for fun," I'd take the day on the set.
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Agent
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« Reply #128 on: January 21, 2003, 09:41:52 AM »

[td]Agent: [/td] [td]You can go back in time and be an extra in any one Eastwood movie. Your wardrobe will be supplied, and you may keep it afterwards. With that in mind, which film do you pick?[/td][/table]
I think I'd pick Escape from Alcatraz. Those threads the cons wore look pretty comfortable, and they'd be great for lounging around the house. Maybe I'd make an evening trip to the grocery store now and then and freak people out.

Agent: Who are your three favorite co-stars in an Eastwood movie...male or female?
Jeff Bridges – classic team
Jessica Walter - they made a great couple, don’t you think?
Reni Santoni – great casting. Maybe he would’ve been better for the part that Rodriquez played in Blood Work?


Okay:

KC: If you were invited to be on a talk-show and have a one-on-one debate with Patrick McGilligan, what would you ask/say to him?

Gant: Have you ever seen a Clint movie in the theater where someone sitting close to you was so annoying/and or distracting, it practically ruined the movie?

AKA23: Have you ever been criticized by family or friends for liking Eastwood and his movies?

William:: You’ve been invited to play a bit part (recite one line) in a new Eastwood movie. However, the date/time set for the shooting conflicts with an interview you have for a job that pays $90k+ annually, and you’re guaranteed the position if you do the interview – any rescheduling is out of the question. Which would you choose?



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AKA23
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« Reply #129 on: January 21, 2003, 12:50:38 PM »


AKA23: Have you ever been criticized by family or friends for liking Eastwood and his movies?

YES! I have most definitely been criticized for liking Eastwood and his movies. I'm always getting jokes from family members about Eastwood! My mom likes Eastwood, so I don't get jokes from her about it, but my brother is always joking about Eastwood and how I post on the web board (he likes a few of his movies), and my Dad doesn't understand the Eastwood thing either. I'm not sure whether or not he likes Eastwood or not, but he jokes about it too! So, yeah, the short answer is yes, all the time :)
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AKA23
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« Reply #130 on: January 21, 2003, 12:52:48 PM »

All right folks. By my calculations, I owe about six questions. 2 from the first one yesterday, and two more for the other two questions that I was asked, and two from today so far! Hmm..I've got work to do :)
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AKA23
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« Reply #131 on: January 21, 2003, 01:30:21 PM »

All right. Here are my questions:

BDC : From a social standpoint, there have been quite a few films that Clint has done where one could conceivably attach some kind of a social message. For example, with True Crime, one could easily see the situation depicted in the film as a statement against the death penalty. Personally, I don't, but I see where the argument could be made. Do you feel that as a filmmaker Clint intends to, through his characters, his film choices, or something else, attach any kind of a social message, or is that just a function of the character, or the film role, or whatever? Do you believe Clint intends to "say something" with his films, or not? If you do, can you give a few examples of films in which you feel a message was conveyed, and what you felt that mesage was?

KC : You kind of copped out on my Patrick McGilligan question, but that's okay ;) Have you ever thought of writing a script or some kind of treatment for Eastwood to do in a film? It seems to me as if you've been involved in so many different ways that it wouldn't be such a stretch for you to try to work on a script. Do you or have you in the past ever had any ideas that you felt might work for Clint? Have you just never thought about it?

MGK : Sometimes there are films that have the ability to touch us or profoundly affect us in one way or another. Some people may call them "life changing" film experiences, but I'm not really sure that your experience with a film can really change your life. Have you ever had that kind of experience with an Eastwood film? If so, what film was that, and why did it have such a profound effect on you? What was that effect?                                                      

Matt : One of your friends comes up to you and asks you "so who is this Clint Eastwood guy?" (This has happened to me), after recovering from the initial shock, what do you tell this guy, how do you approach the situation, and would you feel some kind of an obligation to try to initiate him to become some kind of a Clint Eastwood fan, or at least gain some exposure to the man and his work?  

Conan : Describe Clint. ONE WORD.

Daisy : A guy comes up to you and you're discussing Eastwood, and he casually remarks that he thinks that The Dead Pool is the best Eastwood film that he's done, and that if it's not the best, it's definitely the best out of the Harry series. You tell him that you disagree, and that the man has acted and directed in a lot of films that were better than that. The guy goes "he directs?" HEHE...what do you say to this guy, do you try to convince him of his stupidity in saying that The Dead Pool is the best in the Harry series (this has also happened to me, remember I told you that story Matt?), or do you just go crazy on him for knowing nothing about Eastwood and not even knowing that he directs? HEHE ;)

 
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mgk
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« Reply #132 on: January 21, 2003, 01:44:43 PM »

 :) I still owe one tag from yesterday, so......

Xichado:  Since you are familiar with F. Scott Fitzgerald, is there a book that Fitzgerald wrote that you would like to see Eastwood make into a film?

mgk
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bdc28
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« Reply #133 on: January 21, 2003, 02:07:22 PM »

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BDC : From a social standpoint, there have been quite a few films that Clint has done where one could conceivably attach some kind of a social message. For example, with True Crime, one could easily see the situation depicted in the film as a statement against the death penalty. Personally, I don't, but I see where the argument could be made. Do you feel that as a filmmaker Clint intends to, through his characters, his film choices, or something else, attach any kind of a social message, or is that just a function of the character, or the film role, or whatever? Do you believe Clint intends to "say something" with his films, or not? If you do, can you give a few examples of films in which you feel a message was conveyed, and what you felt that mesage was?
 

Man AKA, can you come up with some doozies.

Okay, here is my thought. Clint is a very thoughtful individual, who looked at televsion and theatre as more than just "idiot boxes".  I also believe that working with Sergio Leone gave him a certain sense of helplessness, that he wasnt working with his own script and thought.

I could pretty much say that Clint makes it a POINT to send a message, no matter how subtle, to his fans. Sometimes he would send MULTIPLE messages into his stories. When he wasnt working with his own scripts, he chose stories that were thought provoking.

Let me grab a couple off of the top of my head.

JOSEY WALES: Now although this was based on a book, the thoughts were there, definitely. The irony that "white man" was so good in his own mind, but could tear a country apart in its own civil war. That the Native American was supposed to be so "bad", but ended up being the saviors of the stories. The scene between Wales and Ten Bears couldnt say more.

DIRTY HARRY: This was just a pursuit of truth. That the "system" is not only inadequate, but breaking down.  That good guys go on getting punished for the deeds of the bad.

UNFORGIVEN: That legends are not legends, but very fallable humans.

Overall, if I had to say what message was consistent in every Clint movie, it was the breakdown of the image, and the pursuit of the gritty REAL truth. Even the spaghetti westerns said "THIS is how the west was...not white hats".

Okay, ALL MEMBER TAG!!! All members have to answer this question. I cant limit it to one person. NAME THE MOMENT YOU FELL INTO THE EASTWOOD MOVIES. What were you watching, and what was it about? Why?
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« Reply #134 on: January 21, 2003, 02:09:36 PM »

..and of course, the most important truth in all of Eastwoods movies.....

That Thunderbolt and Lightfoot were gay.
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« Reply #135 on: January 21, 2003, 03:04:44 PM »

Ah.. a question for me... ;D

Question from Agent...
Have you ever seen a Clint movie in the theater where someone sitting close to you was so annoying/and or distracting, it practicaly ruined the movie.

Well Agent, theres a big fat yes to that.

Actually the movie wasn't ruined but pretty damned close.

I was lucky enough to be in San Diego when In the line of Fire was released. I was very excited about this as I'd been in SanFrancisco during the build up for the release and seen/heard all the positive reviews about the film. I'd also visited Carmel a week or so before so I was definitely looking forward to seeing my second Eastwood film Stateside. (My first being Heartbreak Ridge in NY)
The cinema was packed and the film rolled.. within minutes I became aware of a woman behind me chatting to someone.. I tried to ignore it but she went on and and f*****' on. She seemed to be describing the film to her partner almost scene by scene. I couldn't believe no one said anything, almost as if it were normal behavour..
Eventually I cracked.. I mean, this was a major Eastwood release.. and you can only ever experience seeing a film in the cinema for the first time once..so I turned around a loudly told her to shut up. It was at this point I realised that her partner closely resembled Butcher Hinks from the Dead Pool and I quickly realised why no one else had said anything... There was a murmor of aproval from the audience as I slunk back down in my seat, fully expecting some kind of violence..but it didn't come.. I never heard another sound from them throughout the rest of the film.. and when the lights came up they were gone...

A lucky break I reckon, still, it didn't ruin what for me was a great Eastwood performance..

My tags to follow.


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AKA23
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« Reply #136 on: January 21, 2003, 03:09:53 PM »

Hey Gant :) I asked you this question too. Maybe you missed it awhile back:

Gant: : I know that you are not a huge fan of Clint Eastwood's movie version of Firefox , but that you liked the original novel by Craig Thomas quite a bit. In your view, what would have made it a better film? If you were in charge, what things would you have changed about it to improve it and have it be a great Eastwood film? Would you have stayed closer to the book (if drastic changes were made from the original), or what?
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« Reply #137 on: January 21, 2003, 03:13:08 PM »

Agent:Sonia Braga is a brasilian actress that played with Clint in The Rookie.Her character was very criticized here,called speechless and vulgar.Do you agree?What your thoughts about her performance in that movie?

I hate to say this Aline, but it's been so long since I've seen that movie (on TV only), that I don't recall Braga's performance. Do you have another question I could maybe answer? Sorry.... :-[
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« Reply #138 on: January 21, 2003, 04:22:37 PM »

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What movies of Clint Eastwood do you need for your total collection?

Now that IS a new question,William  ;)

I have all Clint movies excepting "Joe Kidd" (I love the movie) and "Space Cowboys".I never have seen "The Witches" and "Paint your wagon".
I also don't have the two Clyde movies and really I don't miss them  ;)

Doug : Which Clint movie you watch and feel same emotion,don't matter how many times you watch it?

Palm : There is any song that remind you of Clint?Which (title and singer) and why?

Agent,I really want you to answer that question.What about you re-watch the movie and answer later?
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« Reply #139 on: January 21, 2003, 04:50:21 PM »

Matt asked me what Eastwood Location i would like to visit:

I would love to take a look at the Eiger and be impressed by all that Climbing Clint has done himself.

Xichado asked me what book i would like to see Clint make an adaptation and why of:
It's has already been done but i would like to see him do another adaptation of "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzergald. It is my favorite book, Clint has never made a roaring twenties film so i would love to see him do a thing like that (as long as there is NO Mia Farrow and Karen Black in it........)

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