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Author Topic: TIGHTROPE: Audience Reaction 2: Favorite Scene  (Read 4341 times)
mgk
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« on: April 24, 2005, 10:55:30 PM »

What is your favorite scene from Tightrope? Why do you like this scene in particular?
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2005, 11:01:54 PM »

My favorite scene is when Wes and his two daughters and four dogs are in the car,and they all look so happy together,probably the only time in the whole movie,and Penny asks Wes "Whats a hard on"?The look on Wes and Amanda's faces are priceless.Wes tries to explain and is having trouble so Amanda just says to forget it.It just look so real between the three it was a great moment in the film.
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2005, 02:13:00 PM »

- And when Wes goes to this club at the beginning.
I love the light in this scene. The shadows "dancing" on Wes' face when he's watching the girls


- When Wes is in the living room drinking Tequila, he's got  his wedding picture in his hand, and then he passes out on the sofa.
Amanda wakes up, tries to remove the picture from his hand and then just snuggles down on top of him, trying to comfort him

It's so touching. SHE is so touching in this scene.


- Near the end of the movie when Wes is with his daughter in the ambulance, after Rolfe broke in the house, handcuffed Amanda, killed the dogs and Mrs Holstein.

They don't talk, but this look they exchange is worth a thousand words.
Wes is on the verge of tears, he feels so guilty and powerless.
It's a very moving and emotional moment.
You see his distress, his pain.
His heart is broken, and so was mine when I first saw the movie and this scene in particular.


- When Wes comes back from the hospital and loses his composure, destroying everything in his bedroom.

Pain, anger ... he feels lost and weak.
And there's this ambiguity, you don't know when he says "I hate you motherf***** !", if he's talking to himself or to Rolfe.
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2005, 04:46:14 PM »

I love the scene in the car where Penny asks Wes what a hard on is, it's so cute and innocent that it's adorable.  I also like all the scenes with Wes and Amanda interacting with each other.  The cookie scene always stands out alot, just the bond between the two of them is so cool, it's great to see. 
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Christopher
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2005, 03:27:01 PM »

The car scene is the funniest. It has always stood out in my mind.
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Lin Sunderland
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« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2005, 06:11:23 AM »

The car scene, the expressions on Amanda and Wes's faces is priceless.  There is a real bond (naturally)  but to be able to make it so perfect for the movie gives a lift to what is mostly a dark and sad story.

Like AB I also love the scene when Amanda tries to comfort her father when he is drunk and holding his wedding photograph.

There is one other when Amanda says she like to cook but would rather cook for her father than her mother.
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Americanbeauty
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« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2005, 09:32:56 AM »

Yes the scene in the car is really good too, I think.

It's funny, and it's ... real.

Poor dad  ;D ;)
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mgk
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« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2005, 04:00:56 AM »

When Amanda comes to check on her father only to find him drunk and depressed over his failed marriage, it was so moving when she climbed on top of him and comforted him in the only way a small young girl could.  Not only is it one of the most tender scenes I have seen, it reveals even more about the wonderful, close relationship she and her father have.

Very well done.
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dane with no name
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« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2005, 02:43:05 PM »

Strangely, i like the scene where Rolfe sees the baloon flying into the air during the carneval. It reminds me of a scene in Fritz Langs movie M (1931) about a childkiller (Peter Lorre) who has a habit of tricking small girls into cellars and then killing them (while he whistles the music from Peer Gynt; Hall of the mountain king.)
At the start of the movie M he buys a baloon for a small girl, and later you see it drift into the sky...

I dont know if it is a sort of homage to this movie (one of the first movies about serial childkillers/molesters in movie history) but it´s done brilliantly and you just know what Rolfe is thinking about...

The scene is simple, but so filled with mood, suspence, and you dread how the movie are going to progress further...
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Christopher
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« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2005, 01:51:59 PM »

Strangely, i like the scene where Rolfe sees the balloon flying into the air during the carnival. It reminds me of a scene in Fritz Langs movie M (1931) about a childkiller (Peter Lorre) who has a habit of tricking small girls into cellars and then killing them (while he whistles the music from Peer Gynt; Hall of the mountain king.)
At the start of the movie M he buys a balloon for a small girl, and later you see it drift into the sky...
That's a very interesting thought. You never know, it could be a homage.
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dane with no name
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« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2005, 03:09:36 PM »

Quote
That's a very interesting thought. You never know, it could be a homage.
If thats the case, it´s one of the best i´ve ever seen  O0
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Xichado
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« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2006, 08:45:54 AM »

My favorite scene is when they are inside Dixie Brewery and Block looks around and finds similarities on the brewery production (bottling) line with the murders and his sex life and Block starts to feel haunted by it:

    • As Block pays attention to the tennis shoes and realizes that the killer can be any man, even himself

    • The sound of bottles rattling just like Judy Harper’s massage device that she used with/on Block

    • The bottles being filled and the analogy with the bubbling hot tub where Jamie Cory was killed

    • The bottles dripping just like Block and Becky’s bodies were during their sexual rendez-vous

    • The gear that (reminds me) of a well thought and synchronized/effecting plan to terrorize Block   

    • Block recalling his nightmare and waking up from it, as a red/orange glow is revealed on the glasses of an employee as if he (Block) is facing hell

    • And the welder’s mask concealing the identity of the man (killer) behind it, just like the killer does when he attacks.

I think it’s touching to see Block raising his right arm and covering his face/sight, to me it expresses the personal torment that Block is going thru and he can no longer run away from it (the pain he feels since his divorce, the sexual encounters and partners that he uses as an escape which are identical to the killer’s preferences). Block kindda shies away from it in confusion, trying to find his way thru the mess he finds himself in. he’s distressed when the foreman touches his shoulder.

With all the symbolism going on I guess it’s easy for the board’s “old timers” to understand why this is my favorite scene, right;)
« Last Edit: January 08, 2006, 09:28:47 AM by Xichado » Logged

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KC
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« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2006, 06:19:01 PM »

The "King of Symbolism" is BACK! 
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Doug
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« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2006, 04:53:04 AM »

The "King of Symbolism" is BACK! 

And with a very insightful, terrific post!
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« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2006, 07:14:35 PM »

You've all picked great scenes.  Dane, I liked the balloon too, thanks for pointing out the possible connection with M.  Part of the reason it resonated for me is that (in common with many kids, probably) I have a very strong early memory of losing a balloon and watching it float away into the night sky.  I had just got it from Santa, and the anguish of losing it was such a big deal to a three year old. :(  Dane, your post makes me think that losing the balloon could also be a symbol for the kids losing part of their innocence. :'(

Xichado, your post is great!  For me that brewery scene is one appreciated more after the first viewing, and I will appreciate it even more now I've read your thoughts. 8)
The gear that (reminds me) of a well thought and synchronized/effecting plan to terrorize Block

Nice point. O0

Like the other ladies who've posted in this thread, I instinctively like any of the touching scenes with Wes and Amanda.  In some ways they are sad (what part of this movie isn't?!), but they are also sweet, and comforting.  I also like the scene near the beginning when Wes and the girls are together preparing to go to the football.  It's not often we see an Eastwood character being such a family man.

I love the scene in which Wes sits alone in the kids' room, and looks out the window as they reluctantly go out with their mother.  It's sad, but speaks volumes.  It's kinda unexpected for Eastwood, but he played it very well, and it must be such a common experience nowadays.  I just love the way he toys forlornly with the kids teddy (is it a Sesame Street toy?).  The splashes of bright colour in the room contrast well with the generally dull tone.

For my favourite it's a toss up between that scene and the one Lin mentions:
when Amanda says she like to cook but would rather cook for her father than her mother.
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KC
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« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2009, 09:58:54 PM »

Thanks to everyone for participating in this discussion. This topic is now closed, please post any additional thoughts in the General Discussion forum.
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