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Author Topic: Clint's Guns  (Read 309067 times)
D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #80 on: January 16, 2004, 10:33:28 PM »

I may have to put Joe Kidd on the back-burner... ??? ::)
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Washingtonian
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« Reply #81 on: January 24, 2004, 11:27:10 PM »

My first post...

This is a very intersting topic. As for what Clint's gun at the end of GBU is, I believe that it is either an 1863 or 1859 Sharps Calvary Carbine.

If you study that rifle carefull, you can not the absence of the ramrod underneath the barrel which shows that it is not a muzzleloader. Also, you can see the absence of any apparent type of magazine and of course the octagonal barrel. Those all seem to point to a Sharps.
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Concorde
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« Reply #82 on: February 20, 2004, 06:18:06 AM »

The rifle that Clint uses through most of GBU (to shoot nooses, etc.) is a Henry repeater, but "Washingtonian" is quite right about the gun used in the final scene, to shoot Tuco loose from the tree over the grave -- it's some sort of single-shot long range rifle that Blondy acquires from the scabard on Angel Eyes' horse.

As for that prop in the Las Vegas Planet Hollywood, if it was indeed a Springfield rifle, it might have been used by one of the extras in the film -- a Union or Confederate soldier, perhaps. I do know that the now-defunct Planet Hollywood in Atlanta had some very suspicious "props," allegedly from the first Tim Burton BATMAN film. I ate dinner there once with some professional movie propmen (guys who worked on SWAMP THING and IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT), and they howled with laughter at this stuff, denouncing it as obviously fake.
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KC
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« Reply #83 on: February 20, 2004, 07:25:57 PM »

Concorde! You came back!

Great to see a post from you again. Thanks for adding to this thread! 8)
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Concorde
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« Reply #84 on: February 21, 2004, 07:30:37 AM »

 :) Glad to be back again, KC. For the past year I've had technical troubles with three different computers and two different Internet accounts, hence my spotty presence here. Just invested in a new laptop and set up this board as #1 in my favorites list, so maybe now I can appear here more often.

As a big fan of antique firearms (my favorite magazine is GUNS OF THE OLD WEST, which I savor with a gusto most guys reserve for PLAYBOY or CAR AND DRIVER), this particular Topic is obviously my favorite on the Board.
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ListerD
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« Reply #85 on: March 21, 2004, 04:55:03 PM »

Does anybody have an idea what the brass machine gun was which Ramon Rojo used to ambush the American soldiers in "A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS" ?

I think an 1886 Maxim, which was the first true machine gun (i.e., mechanically operated by the ammunition, rather than a manually-operated weapon, such as the Gatling gun) would fit the time period.

If the weapon WAS a Maxim, I suppose that Ramon Rojo could've somehow gotten hold of one--after all, he and his family were, essentially, arms dealers.

John,

If this is a Maxim, its been seriously modified.  The original model Maxim (often called the Maxim Gun) designed in 1884 was a single-barrel water-cooled weapon.  The barrel/coolant housing was fully enclosed with a single barrel extending beyond the housing.  The rear sight also looks wrong as the Maxim Gun had a tangent sight mounted behind the barrel whereas the gun Ramon is firing has a leaf sight mounted on the barrel.  The belt feeder is also in the wrong place.  Also the weapon appears to be "firing" from several of the "barrels" that can be seen in front-angle footage.  I have a feeling this may have been a scratch-built model as there is no ammo being fed through the belt feeder (not blanks or anything, its completely empty), the receiver doesn't perfectly match anything I've ever seen, and it appears to have over 40 barrels!  Its not a Nordfelt, Vickers, Maxim, or Gatling.  Overall, it looks closest to the Maxim Gun, but I have a feeling that was the intention, to have something that kind of looks like a Maxim.  In other words, my money (or fistful of dollars) is on a scratch-buillt non-working model that looked kinda cool and was historically in the ballpark (in that multi-barreled machine guns were invented by the time.

Also, just an FYI, the Rojos were selling liquor, the Baxters were the gun runners.  Ramon probably got the gun from the American soldiers he and his men ambushed.  Remember he orders his men to pose the bodies of the Mexicans and Americans so it looked like they killed each other.

Hope that helps!
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KC
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« Reply #86 on: March 21, 2004, 06:43:07 PM »

Thanks for the detailed post, ListerD, and welcome to the Eastwood Web Board!
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Concorde
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« Reply #87 on: March 22, 2004, 04:54:34 AM »

Great post, ListerD!

That weird machine gun in FISTFUL has similarly defied my own efforts at identification. It appears to be the same gun -- perhaps literally the very same movie prop -- that was used extensively by Franco Nero in another classic spaghetti western, DJANGO.

I once got a photo of it and posted it on various weapons-collectors' boards, asking for help in identifying it, and nobody ever came forward with an answer. Hence, I really like your theory that it was some sort of one-off special movie prop created for the filmmakers.
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ListerD
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« Reply #88 on: March 23, 2004, 09:00:10 PM »

Thanks, I'll have to check out Django.  If I dig up any more info, I'll post it here.
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Ironfeather
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« Reply #89 on: May 04, 2004, 12:27:46 PM »


How long before we get to the pistol in Pale Rider?  I'm going nuts trying to find it!  E-mail me the answer if you have it!  :)
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #90 on: May 04, 2004, 02:43:41 PM »

No need to wait Ironfeather.  It's a question that comes up often.  



Check out this link:

Remington New Army Model

I have no idea when I'm going to get to Joe Kidd.  I may have to just give up the idea of doing them in order... :-[
« Last Edit: May 04, 2004, 02:44:33 PM by DAmbrosia » Logged
Washingtonian
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« Reply #91 on: May 04, 2004, 10:27:58 PM »

Sweet!   I was wondering about that gun. Thanks for finding that! I saw that movie and wondered what pistol that was.
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #92 on: May 04, 2004, 10:50:39 PM »

To be honest the Remingtons were much stronger of a gun compared to the Colt simply because of the one piece "top" strap conecting the barrel to the grip from the top side.



Easier to convert to fire metallic cartridges as well.

Synopsis

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Ironfeather
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« Reply #93 on: May 11, 2004, 04:40:51 PM »

Thank you all kindly; putting my change in a jar and gonna buy me one!  ;)
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TucoTheRat
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« Reply #94 on: May 18, 2004, 06:53:20 PM »

The rifle that Clint uses through most of GBU (to shoot nooses, etc.) is a Henry repeater, but "Washingtonian" is quite right about the gun used in the final scene, to shoot Tuco loose from the tree over the grave -- it's some sort of single-shot long range rifle that Blondy acquires from the scabard on Angel Eyes' horse.

I'm new here but I wanted to add a few observations.  The rifle that Blondie uses at the end of the GBU is definately a single shot long range rifle.  The question is which one?

Quote
If you study that rifle carefull, you can not the absence of the ramrod underneath the barrel which shows that it is not a muzzleloader. Also, you can see the absence of any apparent type of magazine and of course the octagonal barrel. Those all seem to point to a Sharps.

This is good stuff right here.  No magazine, No ramrod, and an octagonal barrel.  Now, here is what else I noticed.  As Bondie pulls the rifle up to his shoulder you can see that there is something (circular as far as I can tell) on the left side of the reciever.  This could be a clue or could possably just be a saddle ring.  Since we are talking about the receiver also notice that the fore stock and the receiver both meet each other with a nice smooth line.  (sure wish I had a picture to show this)  The one thing that is the most obvious is the hammer.  It's a very low profile hammer.  Even after Blondie shoots the rope, the hammer still does not portrude far from the top of the receiver.  These last 2 points (low hammer & smooth side reciever) makes me beleive that this is definately not a Sharps rifle.  The Sharps has a massive hammer and the receiver is anything but smooth.  


There were, however, 2 other popular types of long range rifles.  The first was the Remington Rolling Block.  The rolling block was first ordered by the US government in quantity of 20,000 guns in .46 and .50 calibers.  The first rifles were delivered in March of 1865, one month before the end of the war.   It was very different from the Sharps in that it didn't have a lever activated breech.  Instead it had a breech with a metal block that rolled back toward the shooter to load and unload the rifle.  Looking at the rifle it seems to have 2 hammers.  The farthest back is in fact the hammer and the far forward one was the rolling block.  The receiver has a very strange shape to yet it is a very smooth line.  All of the 19th century guns that I have looked at also seem to have something on the left side of the receiver.   I, for the life of me, can not figure out what it is nor have I ever asked.


The other rifle is the Winchester 1885 High Wall.  It is a lever operated drop down block type rifle.  This rifle has a  somewhat smooth joining of the receiver and fore stock and the hammer is noticably low.  


I'm not sure if this leads to a solid conclusion.  I will leave if for all of you to decide.  If you were to ask me, I would say that it's probably the Winchester High Wall.  In the movie I didn't notice a rolling block lever sticking up as he is aiming.  As you can see in the photos, the rolling block lever is quite noticable even if you are looking at it from the front of the rifle.  

I realize the dates really screw up my theory but seeing how this takes place during the war and the fact that the Rolling Blocks weren't delivered in time really makes the dates a non issue.  Besides it's just a movie! ;)
« Last Edit: May 18, 2004, 08:24:47 PM by TucoTheRat » Logged
KC
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« Reply #95 on: May 18, 2004, 08:30:37 PM »

Hey, great post, Tuco, you seem very knowledgeable!
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 09:00:03 PM by KC » Logged
Washingtonian
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« Reply #96 on: May 19, 2004, 02:04:26 PM »

Wow Tuco, you are smart.  ;D I just watched the pieces where Clint has the rifle.

When he is putting the rifle in back in the scabbard after he shoots the rope it looks like Clint is grabbing something more than the trigger guard. I never was able to get a little bit of a look at the hammer though. It looked like there was only one.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2004, 02:04:41 PM by Washingtonian » Logged
KyleMoss
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« Reply #97 on: August 09, 2004, 11:55:05 AM »

Ok...  Bronco Billy. Real Colt's or Great Westerns?  ;)  ;D
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umrguy42
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« Reply #98 on: August 11, 2004, 10:45:57 AM »

I too am semi-anxious to know what guns were used in Josey Wales, particularly his gun at the beginning, the one he's practicing/regaining his marksmanship with after his farm is burned.  

I'm pretty sure that he has a Colt Navy revolver, I think 1858, and I believe he may carry two Colt Walker pistols (the Shootists' website at http://www.theshootists.co.uk/coltwalkerlives.htm claims the gun is used in the movie) that he later on tends to use as his "main" guns... but that first gun is rather intriguing.
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KC
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« Reply #99 on: August 11, 2004, 10:28:22 PM »

umrguy42, DAmbrosia seems to have wandered off for a spell ... we hope he'll be back soon. In the meantime, I can tell you that he has identified the "smoky ruins" gun as a Colt 1861 Navy Model, and confirms that the two huge revolvers that Josey is frequently seen brandishing in the film's publicity are indeed "Walker" Colts (the same weapon that proved the doom of Corky Corcoran, as Little Bill relates it, in Unforgiven).

Here's his post about Josey's guns ...
http://www.clinteastwood.org/forums/index.php?action=display;board=8;threadid=137;start=0#msg2805

This was in a thread about a gun for sale on eBay, a Colt Army model, that was allegedly used by Eastwood in the film. We came to the conclusion that it may have been used by someone else, but probably not by Eastwood.
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