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Chrissie
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« Reply #260 on: February 15, 2007, 06:16:19 AM »

At this time, I read the Harry Potter series. I really love it. It's not usual black-and.white, good and evil. Some good have evil behave, too. And even the main villain wasn't evil the whole life. First he little child without parents but with special talents. It seems so fascinating to me.
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Sylvie
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« Reply #261 on: February 15, 2007, 06:28:48 AM »

P.D James : " The Children of Man"  O0
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2007 Movie journal
little_bill
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« Reply #262 on: February 15, 2007, 06:55:30 AM »

finished "way of the shark" yesterday Scofield Kid, your right, great book, norman has had an intereting life, great business man, read Bagman too which is the collected articles of Retief Goosens Caddy Colin Byrne, Very Interesting reading,

as was Four Iron in the Soul by Lawrence Donnegan, about how a journalist spent a year on tour as a caddy.

Just Purchased

Payne Stewart: The Authorised Biography

Peter Aliss: My Life

Seve Ballesteros
« Last Edit: February 15, 2007, 07:00:57 AM by little_bill » Logged

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Gant
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« Reply #263 on: March 04, 2007, 01:38:48 AM »

Quote
The Look, Adventures In Rock And Pop Fashion




Must rank as one of the best books about fashion ever.
Author Paul Gorman traces Pop's 50 year relationship to fashion. Chapters covering the spontaneous cults of the 50's to the 60's  right up to present day. Includes many interviews with past style icons and designers.. Bowie, Malcom McLaren, Paul Smith etc.. and many superb photos.

Great tag line...  :)

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An essential purchase for anyone who has ever cared about offending his or hers parents

I'm also re-reading

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Miles, The Autobiography
by Quincy Troupe



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Lilly
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« Reply #264 on: March 13, 2007, 06:10:04 AM »

I have a new home from home in London: Foyles bookshop on Charing Cross Road.  The stock is overwhelming.  Plus there is a great jazz music shop, and adjoining cafe.  A great place to hang out and read.  I picked up a few new books.

Quartet in Autumn by Barbara Pym

In Pharaoh's Army by the great Tobias Wolff

Acts of War: The Behaviour of Men in Battle by Richard Holmes
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KC
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« Reply #265 on: March 13, 2007, 10:45:39 AM »

Gosh, I remember Foyles! From ages ago when I was last in London! It's still there! :o

And of course, they have a website now ...

http://www.foyles.co.uk/foyles/index.asp
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Chrissie
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« Reply #266 on: March 13, 2007, 11:04:23 AM »

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. It's the first time I read this in English, and it's easier than I thought.
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Lilly
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« Reply #267 on: March 13, 2007, 01:17:05 PM »

Good for you, Chrissie. O0

Gosh, I remember Foyles! From ages ago when I was last in London! It's still there! :o

And of course, they have a website now ...

http://www.foyles.co.uk/foyles/index.asp

Yes, I wish I'd seen it pre-1999 when it was still kept in the eccentric manner before the old lady died.  However, the modernisation hasn't entirely robbed it of its soul.  You can eavesdrop on some of the best conversations whilst drinking coffee at the nice old wooden tables...
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Gant
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« Reply #268 on: March 13, 2007, 01:50:19 PM »

I used to work just behind Foyles and spent many happy hours amongst the shelves..
 It was a great shame when Ray's Jazz shop was forced out because of high rents, and so so great that it found a new home in Foyles







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Richard Earl
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« Reply #269 on: March 16, 2007, 12:06:54 AM »

How was the Miles Davis bio Gant?
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Gant
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« Reply #270 on: March 16, 2007, 01:02:52 PM »

Superb.. I've read it before but have been listening to a lot of Miles recently so thought I'd re-read it...

On an unrelated issue... I've just secured a job ( 2 hours a week.. no pay) in a charity shop checking out and pricing the books/vinyl/cd's etc.... could be fun, and I might find a few goodies along the way.  :)
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« Reply #271 on: March 17, 2007, 03:19:17 AM »

Gant that is a great voluntary job AND there is a chance of a real bargain for you.   ;)
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« Reply #272 on: March 17, 2007, 03:28:21 AM »

I have just finished a Hammond Innes book Isvik.   I thought I had read all his books then I found this one in a charity shop for only 50 p and it is in very good condition.  ( There you are Gant you are sure to find something you want to read.)
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Gant
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« Reply #273 on: March 17, 2007, 08:49:51 AM »

Absolutely....  O0
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Lilly
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« Reply #274 on: March 17, 2007, 03:41:32 PM »

Good for you, Gant. And yes, hope you find some goodies... I love the serendipity that comes of browsing in secondhand bookshops...all those special finds, that feel like they were put there just for you to discover...
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Christopher
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« Reply #275 on: March 22, 2007, 08:36:33 PM »

I just recently finished reading Walter Mosley's Gone Fishin'. I'm looking forward to reading some more books in the Easy Rawlins series. O0

I'm currently reading The Shrinking Man by Richard Matheson. I love the movie, which Matheson adapted himself, and the book is really cool too. He is my favorite writer and I'm really looking forward to getting around to Hell House (I've seen The Legend of Hell House, which Matheson also adapted) and The Beardless Warriors, just to name two that I think sound really good. That last title was apparently inspired by his experience in World War II.
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Hemlock
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« Reply #276 on: March 30, 2007, 02:44:58 AM »

I'm looking forward to reading some more books in the Easy Rawlins series. O0


I`m also big fan of Walter Mosley`s Easy Rawlins novels.

Last book I read was Arturo Pèrez-Reverte`s El Capitan Alatriste.Intresting and quite entertaining book.

I heard that there`s a film made after this character(Alatriste)starring Viggo Mortensen.Has anybody seen it??

Now reading Lee Child`s Persuader



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Jed Cooper
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« Reply #277 on: April 15, 2007, 12:08:09 PM »

I recently just finished Flags Of Our Fathers.  I've been so busy lately that I almost gave up.  It got to where I'd sit down to read, then considered quitting.  I hung in there, though and stuck with it 'til the end and am very glad I did.  I enjoyed the book very much.
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« Reply #278 on: April 15, 2007, 01:33:59 PM »

- "If You Ask Me" by Libby Gelman-Waxner

Here's my review:

     While the purists -those who refer to cinema as “The Seventh Art”, think of “entertainment” as a dirty word, and for whom refinement, cinematic excellence and style matter more than anything else- will very likely qualify the book as outrageous and ask that its author be put in a cage without a pen or paper, there is a good chance that the rest –that is approximately 99 percent of the population, will find “If You Ask Me” outrageously funny and won’t be able to put it down.
     Everything that there is to know about movies and movie stars ‘Made in Hollywood’ is in “If You Ask Me” by Libby Gelman-Waxner. The book is a compilation of her columns published in Premiere magazine during the 90s. It is the “Hollywood for Dummies,” an indispensable guide that tells all about the hidden face of American cinema. While traditional movie reviews are 99 percent analysis, and 0.9 percent humor, with half the language used being so technical that it is necessary to re-read each sentence at least a dozen times in order to make sense of the whole thing, this book is the exact opposite. It is light, fresh, fun, straight to the point, and the author, for a change, doesn’t take herself, or her book, too seriously. She uses words that an everyday person can understand without having to open a dictionary, which constitutes an achievement in itself  ;)
     An “assistant buyer in juniors’ active wear” reviewing movies in her spare time, she is undoubtedly one of the most off-beat critics of her time. As the self professed “nation’s foremost auteuristic film critic” –and “foremost auteuristic” is the understatement of the year, she has indeed a style of her own: hilariously honest and totally pitiless, especially when it comes to trashing one of America’s most emblematic and prolific businesses by making light on its many flaws and imperfections, and by making fun of and criticizing its beloved stars. Whether you like it or not, even if you didn’t ask, she is going to give her opinion, hence the revelatory title and trademark quicker “If You Ask Me.”
Libby doesn’t wear gloves and isn’t the type to apologize for what she writes: she has absolutely no misgivings, speaking her mind without after-thoughts or taboos. Her reviews are almost gossipy at times, as she often seems more concerned about a star’s haircut or latest love interest than acting style. The result is, 99.9 percent of the time, laugh-out-loud funny, with a good dose of sarcasm, and the author’s caustic sense of humor guaranteeing at least one uncontrollable laughing fit per chapter.
     She simply isn’t in the same league as traditional movie critics, whose books have a reputation for being pretty heavy to the average reader. Libby turns the traditionally boring, over-analytical and head-bangingly complicated, into a fun and unforgettable ride into Hollywood’s backyard, and this for one simple reason: she uses examples that the average moviegoer can relate to, making her book all the more accessible. Her approach to movies is very personal to say the least. No interviews with famous movie stars or directors here, but every chapter is a descent into the personal world of Libby, with occasional participation from her husband and “wildly sought after Upper East Side orthodontist” Josh, her daughter Jennifer, her therapist Arlene Cole-Natbaum, her mother Sondra Krell-Gelman, her best friend Stacy Schiff and her cousin Andrew. What is most enjoyable and makes the book such a delicious read is the ton of references to pop culture, food, health, fashion, politics, a proof that movies are deeply embedded in the American culture. She treats movies as they should be treated: products coming right out of the movie factory that is Hollywood. As the one and only designated movie critic for Premiere magazine, she has a license to criticize and doesn’t miss an occasion to show that she isn’t in the least afraid to use it. She can as easily shoot down a movie on account that its star had a bad hair day, as she can put another one on a pedestal simply because it stars Dennis Quaid or exposes Mel Gibson’s “tush.”
     Although the book is more than 10 years-old, the subject matter hasn’t aged a bit. Hollywood is still the place where “you can be a good actor but talent isn’t necessary”, a  world where superficiality reigns, where hiding behind appearances of beauty, intelligence and talent seems to be the norm, and where quality is when the sequel costs more than the original. She sees the American cinema as “a luscious catalogue of dreams” where “marketing is for 99 percent of filmmaking.” She compares movies to “car commercials on TV” and other American products like Spam or Vidal Sassoon shampoo. Hollywood is where movies don’t require dialogues and plots, only stars, who “are all Lassie.” She also unveils the mystery surrounding directors (“no one really knows what a director does”) who she sees as rather useless individuals who spend their time watching others work, and who went to film school (“a three-year version of a snow day”) only to watch old movies.
     “If You Ask Me” is written in the first person, as Libby is an entire part of the story, giving the reader her input on every little and not so insignificant detail of a movie like the main star’s nose job, dressing habits or accents … everything that people are looking at when they go to the movies but won’t admit. Her take on Hollywood is completely convincing in the sense that she is able to put herself in the shoes of the “ignorant American Cineplex addict”, because she is one herself. She knows that the average American filmgoer couldn’t care less about cinematography, or the art of directing a movie, but is avid for car chases, shower scenes, “naked movie stars, exploding squad cars and [a star’s] latest surgical procedure.”
And like any respected movie critic, Libby picks the movies that she thinks deserve to be praised. “The Libby Awards” or “The Libbys,” are a hilariously deranged version of the real Academy Awards, where the Oscar statue is replaced by one of Libby’s duplicate wedding gifts  ;D

Bottom line is: I loved it  :D


- "Persistence of Double Vision: Essays on Clint Eastwood" by William Beard

Interesting read, but way too technical at times.
See above when I talked about "over-analytical and head-bangingly complicated" books about movies? Well this one is a very good example  ;) Still worth reading. For the die-hard Eastwood fan only.
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KC
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« Reply #279 on: April 15, 2007, 02:58:37 PM »

Nice review of If You Ask Me, AB! Was it done for a class? (Just curious ... and I'd give you an A.)

You neglected to mention that Libby Gelman-Waxner is the alter ego, or as you might say nom de plume, of the screenwriter Paul Rudnik. ;)

- "Persistence of Double Vision: Essays on Clint Eastwood" by William Beard

Interesting read, but way too technical at times.
See above when I talked about "over-analytical and head-bangingly complicated" books about movies? Well this one is a very good example  ;) Still worth reading. For the die-hard Eastwood fan only.

Personally, I feel that Beard's book is one of the least jargon-ridden film books by an academic that I've read. I liked it a lot. But it certainly does help to be a die-hard Eastwood fan! :)
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