News: Watch Clint Eastwood's RICHARD JEWELL, now available streaming and on Blu-ray and DVD!


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 28 29 [30] 31 32 ... 52 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Recent Books Read  (Read 199487 times)
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6581



View Profile Email
« Reply #580 on: June 29, 2010, 08:59:46 PM »

I love that collection, Elizabeth! O0 I bought it several years back for a class and Dorothy Johnson became a favorite, though I haven't gotten around to finding any of her other stuff (I want to get around to reading her novel Buffalo Woman).
Logged
Alcatraz
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1200



View Profile Email
« Reply #581 on: June 29, 2010, 11:01:57 PM »




The first 4 Parker novels by Richard Stark.


And some Tintin comics.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2010, 11:11:00 PM by Alcatraz » Logged

"Reality continues to ruin my life" - Calvin
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #582 on: July 06, 2010, 08:16:40 PM »



I picked this up at my favorite secondhand book seller.  Gone to Texas got my attention and held it through to the end.  Having read it, now I will go back and watch The Outlaw Josey Wales again and some things should make more sense.  I didn't enjoy The Vengeance Trail of Josey Wales nearly as much.  It seemed to be an illustration of Josey Wales' chief characteristics, but didn't really tell me anything new about him.  Also, the author sometimes forgot he was telling a story and added information that, while interesting, was not essential to the story and slowed it down.  Overall, my reading experience was satisfactory and I will keep the book.  :)
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
Lin Sunderland
Guest


Email
« Reply #583 on: July 07, 2010, 01:42:34 AM »

Those eyes on the cover make him look scary!!   
Logged
TWOMULES
Guest


Email
« Reply #584 on: July 07, 2010, 10:09:32 AM »

Those eyes on the cover make him look scary!!   
I reckon so! :)

Lin, he looks more like Lee Van Cleef!  :o
Logged
Lin Sunderland
Guest


Email
« Reply #585 on: July 07, 2010, 02:36:38 PM »

I reckon so! :)

Lin, he looks more like Lee Van Cleef!  :o

Yes I see the likeness.  :)
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24836


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #586 on: July 23, 2010, 12:14:30 AM »



A little book that fans might enjoy. It's an imaginary interview with the author and Groucho using old quotes from films and interviews. It's only a pocket book size so it can be read in one sitting.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #587 on: July 26, 2010, 08:36:56 AM »



This is the story of Dr. Lehman, who chose to become a country doctor in Mt. Eaton, Ohio when he graduated from medical school.  He came to town with all his new scientific training and ideas (including babies having to be born in hospitals), but a desire to be of real service to the Amish community.  I found his willingness to be of service to others, even at disadvantage to himself, to be very inspiring.  I did have many sympathetic thoughts for his wife as I read the book.  There would have to be some fundamental changes in me to be able to cope with having a husband who is always on call.

I live in a predominantly Amish/Mennonite town all summer long, so reading this book was especially meaningful.  How the Amish balance between their traditional ways and the intrusion of technology into their environment is very fascinating for me.  I know a number of Amish people who regularly use cell phones.  I keep wondering how they charge the battery since their houses don't have electricity.  ???
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
TWOMULES
Guest


Email
« Reply #588 on: July 26, 2010, 08:55:24 AM »

Elizabeth77, that's very educational  O0

We should all value other peoples traditional ways and customs, the world would be a better place. :)
Logged
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #589 on: July 28, 2010, 10:47:03 AM »

Living Up to Billy by Elizabeth Cooper (c. 1915)

http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/33264

This little book is written in the form of letters, covering a two year span, from Nancy Lane to her sister Kate.  Kate is serving a term in prison and Nancy (Nan) is left to care for Kate's little boy.  The letters reveal how Nan tries to give Billy a better chance than she had growing up, Nan's own development, and her love for and loyalty to Kate.  It would be hard to finish this book without smiling.   :)
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32266


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #590 on: July 28, 2010, 08:07:51 PM »

That's quite a find, Elizabeth77 ... I didn't notice the date you gave, and from your description I thought it was a contemporary "young adult" "social issues" tale. I never heard of Elizabeth Cooper, but I see the New York Public Library has several of her works, including Living up to Billy, which is one of three that Google Books has scanned from our collection. You can read any of them free via NYPL's catalog or direct from Google Books, in the original format, with the original illustrations:

Logged
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #591 on: July 29, 2010, 09:51:14 AM »


How did you happen to "discover" this work? ???

KC, I regularly check out the Project Gutenberg website for new books.  http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page
I go through their Recent eBooks link and see what's been listed in the last 24 hours, 7 days, etc.  I have found many delightful gems this way.  Living Up to Billy just looked interesting and I started reading it.  They have a plain text version, but also an html version that includes the pictures.
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32266


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #592 on: August 01, 2010, 09:48:58 PM »

I'm reading this now. (In Swedish, not in Finnish.) It's the first long book I've read in a long time. I wanted to see what all the fuss was about.

So far: A good read as Hemlock says, an absorbing story, but nothing extraordinary. (And I've seen the movie, so I know how it comes out.)



OK, I've now finished the trilogy ... Here are the second and third volumes.


(Scans of my own copies)

They're titled in English, respectively, The Girl Who Played With Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest. (As you recall, the Swedish title of the first volume, meaning "Men Who Hate Women," was changed to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo in English.)

I really enjoyed this. The first installment, as I said above, struck me as absorbing, with interesting characters, but nothing special. But the second and third volumes just seem to get better as they go along. These two are really one continuous book, telling a single story, running to some 1300 pages, and there's an enormous amount of detail in them. What really struck me was Larsson's gift for continually introducing new characters who fit into the story and whom you care about. The ending of the third book is fairly satisfactory, but there are a lot of people whose fates you'd like to know more about.

Unfortunately, Larsson died before any of the three volumes were published, and though it's known that he had nearly completed a fourth volume in the series and planned a fifth, there's a chance that nothing more will ever see print. The manuscript of the unfinished fourth volume is the subject of a dispute between his legal heirs (his father and brother) and the woman he lived with for many years but never married.

Since there's so much money involved (the three books have sold like wildfire all over the world), I suspect the two sides will reach a settlement eventually. I'm kind of hoping to find out something about Lisbeth Salander's twin sister (whereabouts unknown at the time their father's estate was settled) and also about how the romance between Blomkvist and the Amazonian secret policewoman turned out.

Meanwhile, I've seen the first two Swedish movies and am awaiting the opening of the third one here, sometime this month I believe. And I'm NOT looking forward to the Hollywood remakes!
« Last Edit: August 09, 2010, 06:35:54 PM by KC » Logged
Doug
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2927


"May I make a suggestion..."


View Profile Email
« Reply #593 on: August 02, 2010, 04:58:19 AM »



Meanwhile, I've seen the first two Swedish movies and am awaiting the opening of the third one here, sometime this month I believe. And I'm NOT looking forward to the Hollywood remakes!


Isn't David Fincher directing the American versions?  Still, I can understand not being interested.  An American remake of Let the Right One In (Låt den rätte komma in) is due out soon, and all I can think is...ugh.  So anyway, were the first two films good?  Were they mostly faithful to the books?
« Last Edit: August 04, 2010, 01:00:04 AM by Doug » Logged

"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32266


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #594 on: August 02, 2010, 06:35:17 AM »

They were quite faithful, though they had to condense a lot. The second one stuck closer to the details of the original than the first. I understand that each movie has been released in Sweden in an extended, three-hour format ... I'd like to see that.
Logged
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #595 on: August 04, 2010, 12:37:37 PM »

The Spoils of Poynton by Henry James

The story is well written, and it carried me along to the end, but I don't think I'll ever need to read it again.  It was all a little over my head, or maybe just not to my taste.  I'm not particularly fond of overly sensitive or overbearing characters.  They both tend to set my teeth on edge, and the story revolved around both types of characters!

Mrs. Gereth is obsessed with her beautiful house and beautiful things.  Fleda Vetch falls under that spell to a certain extent, while also falling in love with Owen Gereth.  Owen falls in (and out of) love with, and eventually marries, Mona Brigstock, another strong willed woman.  The only character I found congenial was Owen.  My conclusion at the end of the story is that women sometimes make life more complicated for themselves than necessary, then have to live with the consequences.
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
Walt
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 909



View Profile Email
« Reply #596 on: August 07, 2010, 05:51:10 AM »

"The Island" by Richard Laymon.
Not one for the squemish but I enjoyed it whilst sunning myself in Egypt.A great holiday read.
Logged
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6581



View Profile Email
« Reply #597 on: August 07, 2010, 09:01:05 AM »

"The Island" by Richard Laymon.
Not one for the squemish but I enjoyed it whilst sunning myself in Egypt.A great holiday read.
I love Island! I found the ending to be very unsettling, and it really stands out as being one of Laymon's best out of what I've read. Have you read many of his novels, Walt? Favorites?
Logged
Walt
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 909



View Profile Email
« Reply #598 on: August 07, 2010, 11:49:58 AM »

I love Island! I found the ending to be very unsettling, and it really stands out as being one of Laymon's best out of what I've read. Have you read many of his novels, Walt? Favorites?

You're right Chris, the ending is something else but not totally unexpected.
I've read most of Laymons stuff.He's one of my favourite horror authors.

If I were to pic a number one novel from what I've read so far it would have to be "Savage"
I loved the way he brought Jack The Ripper to the wild west.Pure fantasy of course but,when written so well, almost plausable.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2010, 11:51:55 AM by Walt » Logged
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #599 on: August 10, 2010, 07:29:44 AM »



With Horse of a Different Color I have finished reading Ralph Moody's autobiographical series to my family.  We have found them all to be enjoyable, but this one appealed to me especially.  As the owner of a small business, I appreciated Mr. Moody's way of conducting his business relationships.  It is good to take other people into consideration when making business decisions, even if it may not appear to be to your immediate advantage (or, indeed, to your advantage at all).  A business person's reputation is has much to do with determining customer loyalty and the willingness of suppliers to work with you.  Most of all, take the good and the bad as they come along in life, and make the best of both.
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
Pages: 1 ... 28 29 [30] 31 32 ... 52 Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T