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Author Topic: Recent Books Read  (Read 199679 times)
Lin Sunderland
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« Reply #640 on: November 21, 2010, 02:14:10 AM »

If you see it in a book store leaf through it, I got hooked that way! Then I went and bought it from Amazon for half the price...  8)

Thanks for the heads up Jaffe.   I will certainly look for it in the big Waterstones bookstore in Durham.
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« Reply #641 on: November 30, 2010, 01:55:45 PM »



Cappy Ricks or The Subjugation of Matt Peasley (1915) by Peter B. Kyne

Cappy Ricks is the owner of the Blue Star Navigation Company and the Ricks Lumber & Logging Company, both of San Francisco.  Mr. Skinner is his general manager.
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In the matter of engaging new skippers or discharging old ones Mr. Skinner had to be very careful. Cappy always declared that any clerk can negotiate successfully a charter at the going rates in a stiff market, but skippers are, in the final analysis, the Genii of the Dividends. And Cappy knew skippers. He could get more loyalty out of them with a mere pat on the back and a kindly word than could Mr. Skinner, with all his threats, nagging and driving, yet he was an employer who demanded a full measure of service, and never permitted sentiment to plead for an incompetent. And his ships were his pets; in his affections they occupied a position but one degree removed from that occupied by his only child, in consequence of which he was mighty particular who hung up his master's ticket in the cabin of a Blue Star ship. Some idea of the scrupulous care with which he examined all applicants for a skipper's berth may be gleaned from the fact that any man discharged from a Blue Star ship stood as much chance of obtaining a berth with one of Cappy Ricks' competitors as a celluloid dog chasing an asbestos cat through Hades.

The reader will readily appreciate, therefore, the apprehensions which assailed Cappy Ricks when the Blue Star Navigation Company discovered it had on its payroll one Matthew Peasley, a Nobody from Nowhere, who not only had the insufferable impudence to apply for a job skippering the finest windjammer in the fleet, but when rebuffed in no uncertain terms, refused to withdraw his application, and defied his owners to fire him.

The story is intended to be lighthearted, but isn't a bad place to learn a few good business principles.  They aren't taught today in most business schools, but they still work.  While Cappy is as sharp as they come when it comes to business deals, he knows how to take care of his employees and their dependents.  They are people to him, not just cogs in a money making machine.

This is one of a number of books about Cappy Ricks by Peter B. Kyne, but the author may be more familiar to you as the author of The Three Godfathers (1913), of which there are several film versions.
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« Reply #642 on: December 01, 2010, 08:58:36 AM »

"A Painted House" by John Grisham.

Good book, however I found the story a bit slow paced at times. I didn't finish it, but plan on going back to it at another time.
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« Reply #643 on: December 09, 2010, 11:41:03 PM »



Another enjoyable read in the series. For some reason it took me an age to get through compared to the first three books and this was a large print edition from the library. Ends with a plot line which will continue in the next book I suspect but I'm taking a break from the Slaughter books to read, The Making Of The African Queen or How I Went To Africa With Bogart, Bacall & Houston & nearly Lost My Mind.
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« Reply #644 on: December 17, 2010, 07:37:35 PM »



The Making of the African Queen: Or How I Went to Africa With Bogart, Bacall and Huston and Almost Lost My Mind by Katharine Hepburn

This was a fun read.  It's style is such that you feel she is sitting across from you and reminiscing about this adventure.  The photographs round out the story nicely.

I was expecting so much more from this. I agree with what E77 says about the style it was written but after seeing White Hunter, Black Heart I ws expecting the Almost Lost My Mind part of the book to be about Hepburn sitting around waiting for Huston to arrive on set because he was more interested in hunting than shooting the picture. The elephant hunt was probably only spoken about once and Hepburn was there with Huston. It took up all of one page maybe.

3/5.
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Lin Sunderland
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« Reply #645 on: December 20, 2010, 04:41:10 PM »

Sorry it didn't come up to your expectations SK.  :(
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« Reply #646 on: December 27, 2010, 10:02:57 PM »



This book practically reads itself. Delightful. And for anyone who was wondering ... the new Coen brothers film is very close to the book in spirit and in substance. And I can confirm what I'd read previously: Much of the film's dialogue was taken directly from the book.
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Doug
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« Reply #647 on: December 28, 2010, 02:49:52 AM »



This book practically reads itself. Delightful. And for anyone who was wondering ... the new Coen brothers film is very close to the book in spirit and in substance. And I can confirm what I'd read previously: Much of the film's dialogue was taken directly from the book.

D'OH!  I knew there was something I wanted to get at the bookstore today.
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« Reply #648 on: December 28, 2010, 07:11:13 AM »

I enjoyed True Grit when I read it a few months ago.  :)
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« Reply #649 on: January 04, 2011, 04:43:15 PM »



http://www.leechild.com/GT.php

Btw am I only one here who reads these Reacher novels by Lee Child  ???

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« Reply #650 on: January 04, 2011, 07:29:56 PM »

Hey, Hemlock, I have a friend who loves that series and tries to get everyone to read it. I finally picked one up ...



... but I haven't started it yet. Just now I'm involved with Henning Mankell's "Wallander" novels. I'm on the seventh of the original series of eight (he's since turned out a few more, I'm told).

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« Reply #651 on: January 11, 2011, 03:26:10 PM »



My wife got me these two Clint Eastwood books for Christmas. I know most of you already have these and I have read your reviews. :)
I will now try and find some time to read them.
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« Reply #652 on: January 12, 2011, 01:35:32 PM »

Hey, Hemlock, I have a friend who loves that series and tries to get everyone to read it. I finally picked one up ...



... but I haven't started it yet. Just now I'm involved with Henning Mankell's "Wallander" novels. I'm on the seventh of the original series of eight (he's since turned out a few more, I'm told).


Ive not read any of the Mankell`s "Wallander" novels but Ive watched just about every movie that`s been made out of his books.
Anyway Im pretty sure that Mankell`s novels are more"intellectual" read over Lee Child`s Jack Reacher novels but if you like straight forward,action filled novels then you might like Child`s novels also.Echo Burning gives you an idea about the whole series.

After Marc Eliot`s disappointing "American Rebel" Im now reading
;)
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« Reply #653 on: January 14, 2011, 11:34:37 PM »



This book practically reads itself. Delightful. And for anyone who was wondering ... the new Coen brothers film is very close to the book in spirit and in substance. And I can confirm what I'd read previously: Much of the film's dialogue was taken directly from the book.

I watched the John Wayne film version of this a couple of weeks ago and will be seeing the new version in two weeks. So I wanted to read this book in between viewings. The original film practically matches everything in the book so it will be interesting to see the remake.

The thing I haven't noticed in the past when I've seen the John Wayne film is that it is the story of Mattie, not Rooster Cogburn. When I watched the film you're waiting for The Duke to appear as he is the star of the film, but reading the book and you only have to read the synopsis on the back cover and Rooster Cogburn isn't even mentioned. It's Mattie's story of how a 14 year old girl travels the west in search of her fathers' killer. In fact it isn't Rooster Cogburn that has "Grit", but Mattie herself. She maybe so young but she can handle anything thrown at her from managing the books on the farm or haggling a fair price for horses. The scenes in the original film with Strother Martin is in the book and just the way she stands up for herself and won't be spoken down to just because she is a child is brilliant.

I highly recommend the book and am looking forward to seeing the new film.

5/5.
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Doug
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« Reply #654 on: January 15, 2011, 06:00:26 AM »

In terms of matching up scenes, the original True Grit is actually more "faithful" to the book.  The Coens don't include several scenes and mildly altered a couple others which remained more faithful in the original.  They also added one or two scenes not in the book, as well as making a rather large and obvious change to how the plot progressed, though it's not a big deal because the characters all end up in the same place.  However, in terms of capturing the "spirit" of the book, then I have no doubt the Coens did a better job.  The one way they're more faithful is in including the original epilogue and in having narration by Mattie.

Of course, how faithful a movie is to the book has little to do with how good the movie is.  I also think the Coens made better use of the novel's rather distinct dialogue and they were smart, I think, to cut out the "baby sister" phrase that was so Wayne-like I though for sure the original had added it in there, but nope, it was in the novel, too.
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« Reply #655 on: January 15, 2011, 10:29:34 AM »

I really should read the book again--a fascinating discussion here about it! I do remember thinking that the original movie follows pretty closely until the very end.
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« Reply #656 on: January 15, 2011, 10:58:26 AM »

I also think the Coens made better use of the novel's rather distinct dialogue and they were smart, I think, to cut out the "baby sister" phrase that was so Wayne-like I though for sure the original had added it in there, but nope, it was in the novel, too.

Isn't it mostly just "Sis" in the book, though? I kind of liked that.
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« Reply #657 on: January 15, 2011, 11:36:38 AM »

I really should read the book again--a fascinating discussion here about it! I do remember thinking that the original movie follows pretty closely until the very end.

Yeah, it was just the epilogue in the book that doesn't appear in the original film.

Isn't it mostly just "Sis" in the book, though? I kind of liked that.

I remember Cogburn calling her Baby Sister a couple of times early on in the book but after that, I can't recall it coming up again.
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« Reply #658 on: February 19, 2011, 03:15:50 AM »



Just finished this bio of English actor Charles Hawtrey. Instantly recognisable from the Carry On films which a lot of us UK members will have grown up with..

Unfortunately another Carry On star who seemed to live a pretty miserable, unfulfilled life...
Bit depressing... but a good read.
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« Reply #659 on: February 19, 2011, 03:27:36 AM »



I finished this last week. Boy oh boy, if you loved the film like I did, you'll love this just as much if not more. So much more in the book than in the movie but just as powerful.

Brilliant.

5/5.
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