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Author Topic: Recent Books Read  (Read 199485 times)
Christopher
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« Reply #660 on: February 26, 2011, 06:50:10 PM »


I just finished The Great Gatsby. I read it about eight years ago for an American lit class, and I've actually read it this time for the same exact class, except I'm teaching it this time around. This is one classic that seems to get quite a mixed reaction, but I enjoyed it both times. Maybe not an all time favorite but a good book nonetheless. It's considered a classic largely because of its portrayal of 1920s America. I haven't read much Fitzgerald but would like to read some of his other stories/novels.
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Alcatraz
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« Reply #661 on: February 27, 2011, 01:24:57 PM »

The Plague by Albert Camus


I'll probably read his The Stranger next.
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Doug
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« Reply #662 on: February 28, 2011, 06:59:49 AM »


I just finished The Great Gatsby. I read it about eight years ago for an American lit class, and I've actually read it this time for the same exact class, except I'm teaching it this time around. This is one classic that seems to get quite a mixed reaction, but I enjoyed it both times. Maybe not an all time favorite but a good book nonetheless. It's considered a classic largely because of its portrayal of 1920s America. I haven't read much Fitzgerald but would like to read some of his other stories/novels.

I really like Tender Is the Night.  I don't care as much for his other novels, though they're all interesting up to a point.  I've never bothered with his short stories, and I recall reading that a lot of his stories were cranked out for money, though I'm sure there are some good ones in there.
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« Reply #663 on: February 28, 2011, 07:08:36 AM »

The Plague by Albert Camus


I'll probably read his The Stranger next.

Love The Stranger, but another book I really love of his is The First Man.  It's the book he was working on when he died.  If I remember my Camus trivia correctly, the manuscript was in his car when he had the fatal accident.  Had he lived, he most surely would have reworked the casual tone of the writing and the clear autobiographical nature of much of the story, but as it stands I found it to be an incredibly enjoyable read.  It was finally published in the mid-90s and I read it about ten years ago, and I definitely intend to reread it at some point.
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"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
Christopher
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« Reply #664 on: March 16, 2011, 10:24:27 AM »


I recently finished The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. It was her only novel, and she killed herself shortly after its publication, which makes the book all the more tragic to read. The main character Esther Greenwood is based on Plath's own experiences as a young woman with a bright future but feels as if she lives under a "bell jar." The book feels a little like The Catcher in the Rye and reminded me of one of my favorite short stories of all time, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper."
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Elizabeth77
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« Reply #665 on: March 18, 2011, 03:24:53 PM »

Asterix and the Big Fight by Goscinny and Uderzo



One can't always be reading serious books.  ;D
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Doug
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« Reply #666 on: March 19, 2011, 05:40:03 AM »

I recently finished The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. It was her only novel, and she killed herself shortly after its publication, which makes the book all the more tragic to read. The main character Esther Greenwood is based on Plath's own experiences as a young woman with a bright future but feels as if she lives under a "bell jar." The book feels a little like The Catcher in the Rye and reminded me of one of my favorite short stories of all time, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper."

I really like that book, and coincidentally I just reread it last month. Catcher in the Rye is another I want to reread, but I only have it as a paperback, and I can't read paperbacks anymore if the book is more than a year old.  I have a really bad allergy to the paper they use in paperback once it starts deteriorating a little, so I have to stick with trade paperbacks or hardback books.  Which really sucks.  It's the only thing I'm allergic to.  Go figure.
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« Reply #667 on: March 19, 2011, 08:31:29 AM »

Doug, maybe you should try your local library for a hardback copy ... or go the e-book route. (Which your local library may have too, by the way.)
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« Reply #668 on: April 03, 2011, 03:07:45 PM »



I was so disappointed with this. The first few in the series were great and only took me just over a week to read but this one, I just couldn't get in to and it took me over a month to knock it over. Reading the last chapter last night, I was so happy to finally get to the end of it that I didn't see the big finale coming. I won't spoil it if you haven't read it but that ending disappointed me even more. :(

2/5.
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Elizabeth77
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« Reply #669 on: April 05, 2011, 01:03:55 PM »



I picked up The Man Who Listens to Horses by Monty Roberts at a library sale.  I didn't read it through in one sitting only because mothers don't get that privilege very often.  I thoroughly enjoyed it and will share it with my family during our reading time in the car.  While the story is mainly about Mr. Roberts' experience in learning to communicate with horses and getting his method accepted by others, I find many lessons for relating with people.   As I read, I found new ways to look at how I deal with my sons.  It made me question if I couldn't find a better way to deal with some behaviors that have been a serious point of friction.  I just finished the book, but I look forward to reading it again.
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« Reply #670 on: April 06, 2011, 12:29:01 AM »


I just finished The Great Gatsby. I read it about eight years ago for an American lit class, and I've actually read it this time for the same exact class, except I'm teaching it this time around. This is one classic that seems to get quite a mixed reaction, but I enjoyed it both times. Maybe not an all time favorite but a good book nonetheless. It's considered a classic largely because of its portrayal of 1920s America. I haven't read much Fitzgerald but would like to read some of his other stories/novels.

I saw this in a store last weekend with a lot of other classic novels from Penguin Publishing for under $7. I purchased The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes but might go back next weekend and pick up The Great Gatsby.
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« Reply #671 on: April 06, 2011, 01:35:16 AM »

I have just finished

While The Light Lasts by Agatha Christie.   A series of short stories most of which reappeared in her later novels. 



Also  Trick of the Dark  by  Val McDermid.



I love Val's books and have met her at a readers day in the Bradford Library.   She is one of my favourite authors.   Her novels are gripping.  She has written a series of Tony Hill novels that are the basis of the television series Wire In The Blood.     She has also written a series of books with Kate Brannigan as a detective and another series of Lindsay Gordon novels.    I was introduced to her writting when I read A Place of Execution.   I have since read all her books and look forward to each new one.
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« Reply #672 on: May 02, 2011, 09:05:20 PM »



I got back to the classics and this was the first one. I hadn't read this before and didn't realise it was a bunch of stories in a book  but it was still very enjoyable. How he comes to some of his conclusions is brilliant. He's the original Monk. ;)

4/5.
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« Reply #673 on: May 05, 2011, 12:01:38 AM »



I read this in one sitting. OK, it's only 120 odd pages and some pages had illustrations but that's quite a feat for me. I don't remember ever seeing the animated film from years ago. Maybe when I was five or six but I couldn't remember and I don't remember ever reading it before but it was quite enjoyable. Plenty of weird characters in this, which had me thinking maybe the author was high when he wrote this. Seriously, it's out there. I'm not saying that in a bad way because I did enjoy it.

4/5.
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« Reply #674 on: May 05, 2011, 12:31:51 AM »

It's one of the great books of Western literature! And it has one of the best lines ever ...

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"What is the use of a book," thought Alice, "without pictures or conversations?"
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #675 on: May 07, 2011, 08:01:19 PM »

It's one of the great books of Western literature! And it has one of the best lines ever ...


My favorite line was:

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They very soon came upon a Gryphon, lying fast asleep in the sun. (If you don't know what a Gryphon is, look at the picture)

Which I had to do, because I had no idea.  ;D
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« Reply #676 on: May 07, 2011, 08:04:48 PM »

But there you go! If it had been a book without pictures, how would you have ever known? ;D
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« Reply #677 on: May 07, 2011, 08:06:30 PM »

If it had been a book without pictures, how would you have ever known? ;D

Google.   :P
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« Reply #678 on: May 07, 2011, 08:43:52 PM »

I knew you were going to say that! ;D
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« Reply #679 on: May 24, 2011, 07:54:09 AM »



Murray Walker's Formula One Heroes. O0
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