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Author Topic: Recent Books Read  (Read 199472 times)
Sylvie
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« Reply #680 on: May 24, 2011, 10:15:25 AM »



In English : "Warlock", Jim Harrison.
On of the funniest novel by this great author, not as pessimistic as some of his books. I couldn't stop thinking about Joe Pesci playing the part of the main character , surely because I watched him recently in "Casino", for the 10th times ... at least :)
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #681 on: June 10, 2011, 04:39:19 AM »



MY GOD!! What a bore. I'm sorry classic book fans but this was torture. 540 pages of sheer torture. I'll probably get bashed for saying that but fair dinkum, this was like watching a bad movie and I  look my watch to see how long there is to go and we're not even half way through yet. Of course stupid me, doesn't flick the book. Just like a film I have to stick it out to the end. It took over a month but geez, I didn't think it was ever going to end.

My biggest problem with this book was when it went from a novel to a text book on whales. Hellooooooooo, if I wanted to read about every different type of whale and their habits and what have you, I would've gone to the library and got a book on that.

1/5.
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« Reply #682 on: June 10, 2011, 06:20:05 AM »

I thought you would have had a whale of a time reading this classic book! ;)
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Doug
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« Reply #683 on: June 10, 2011, 07:09:00 AM »



MY GOD!! What a bore. I'm sorry classic book fans but this was torture. 540 pages of sheer torture. I'll probably get bashed for saying that but fair dinkum, this was like watching a bad movie and I  look my watch to see how long there is to go and we're not even half way through yet. Of course stupid me, doesn't flick the book. Just like a film I have to stick it out to the end. It took over a month but geez, I didn't think it was ever going to end.

My biggest problem with this book was when it went from a novel to a text book on whales. Hellooooooooo, if I wanted to read about every different type of whale and their habits and what have you, I would've gone to the library and got a book on that.

1/5.

I've never read this myself, and frankly I doubt I could get through it from what I know of it.  I have a friend who just read it and it took him probably longer than a month, but he did overall like it.  I don't know.  It's probably an essential, but so is Finnegans Wake, and that looks like it's nothing but pretentious nonsense.  I think the essays within a novel thing was not uncommon in novels from the 1800's.  They just don't hold up well these days.  But kudos for getting through it.  Maybe I'll give it a try, but I really hate these days to have to struggle to get through a book.  Even for the bragging rights of saying I've read it.
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« Reply #684 on: June 12, 2011, 02:05:30 AM »


Quote
Derren Brown, Confessions of a Conjuror




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« Reply #685 on: June 12, 2011, 03:36:33 PM »



Another so called classic. At least this was an easier read than Moby Dick and at about 400 less pages too. It just never really grabbed me.  :-\

Story of two men during the depression who start working at a ranch just to scrap enough money together so they can get a place of their own.

2/5.
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Christopher
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« Reply #686 on: June 12, 2011, 03:56:40 PM »

I've never read Of Mice and Men yet but would like to eventually. I read The Grapes of Wrath some years back and liked it.
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« Reply #687 on: June 12, 2011, 03:59:06 PM »

I've never read Of Mice and Men yet but would like to eventually. I read The Grapes of Wrath some years back and liked it.

Yeah, I loved The Grapes Of Wrath too. The book and the film, so this was disappointing. :(
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« Reply #688 on: June 12, 2011, 04:18:35 PM »

Fight Club.

Maybe it's because I've seen the movie so many times, but I wasn't all that impressed with the book.  What is interesting is seeing how the movie modified certain scenes and certain aspects of the plot for the better.  It was definitely a great adaptation.
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« Reply #689 on: June 15, 2011, 11:10:05 AM »

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo by Capt. Ted W. Lawson

Captain Lawson took part in the Doolittle raid on Japan on 18 April 1942.  This is his account of his participation in the raid and its results, primarily as it affected him personally.  The first five or so sentences of the book succinctly summarized the story, but I'm glad he chose to go into greater detail.  His experiences in China were especially interesting to me.  I was moved by his willingness to share what the amputation of his leg meant to him and his family, especially as he came to terms with his loss and the reactions of strangers.

After reading this book, I resolved again to try and bring cheerfulness and sunshine to the people that I encounter so that I won't add to the burden of those who feel that there is something "wrong" with them, physically or otherwise.  Maybe I can even lighten that burden.
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« Reply #690 on: June 15, 2011, 05:20:59 PM »

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo by Capt. Ted W. Lawson

Captain Lawson took part in the Doolittle raid on Japan on 18 April 1942.  This is his account of his participation in the raid and its results, primarily as it affected him personally.  The first five or so sentences of the book succinctly summarized the story, but I'm glad he chose to go into greater detail. 

For the curious (from Google Books):

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Elizabeth77
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« Reply #691 on: June 15, 2011, 08:17:24 PM »

Thank you, KC.  O0

My brain must be really fuzzy these days because I didn't even think to look in Google Books and I already returned the book to my mother so was unable to quote as I would have liked.
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« Reply #692 on: July 01, 2011, 01:19:48 PM »


Just recently finished Rick Moody's The Ice Storm. I've wanted to read it since seeing the movie version several years back. The book was good though a bit disturbing in some ways. If you've seen the movie, you'll recall it's about the various generations in the area all seem to be experimenting with the same things. Naturally the book goes into more detail.

Now I've gotten a good start into Peter Falk's Just One More Thing. The book is not a typical autobiography, as he explains in the beginning. For the most part, he is just telling little stories in the book relating to his life and career. Or even stories friends of his have told him that he really likes.
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« Reply #693 on: July 05, 2011, 11:12:10 PM »


I just finished The Great Gatsby. I read it about eight years ago for an American lit class, and I've actually read it this time for the same exact class, except I'm teaching it this time around. This is one classic that seems to get quite a mixed reaction, but I enjoyed it both times. Maybe not an all time favorite but a good book nonetheless. It's considered a classic largely because of its portrayal of 1920s America. I haven't read much Fitzgerald but would like to read some of his other stories/novels.

I just finished this after reading Christopher's recommendation back in February. After a slow start I quite enjoyed it. Not sure why it's considered a classic but at least it didn't bore me like Moby Dick.

My edition had an introduction in it by Tony Tanner. A 70 page introduction! I gave up on that after about 20 pages and just read the novel. Maybe the intro may have explained why it's a classic but seriously, 70 pages to introduce a book?
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« Reply #694 on: July 06, 2011, 05:35:15 AM »

Glad you enjoyed it, SK.

Now I've gotten a good start into Peter Falk's Just One More Thing. The book is not a typical autobiography, as he explains in the beginning. For the most part, he is just telling little stories in the book relating to his life and career. Or even stories friends of his have told him that he really likes.
I finished Just One More Thing a few days ago. I did enjoy it but like I said, it wasn't a typical autobiography, and I think I would have enjoyed a little more typical autobriography in it. Some of the stories Falk tells are great, and I probably read most of the book with a smile on my face. But when I got to the end, I felt like I would have liked to have had more.

Now I'm reading a short Richard Matheson novel called Somone is Bleeding. It's from a collection of three short novels of his from the 1950s called Noir (proving that Matheson is pretty much the king of genre fiction).
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« Reply #695 on: July 06, 2011, 05:05:18 PM »

I just finished this [The Great Gatsby] after reading Christopher's recommendation back in February. After a slow start I quite enjoyed it. Not sure why it's considered a classic but at least it didn't bore me like Moby Dick.

My edition had an introduction in it by Tony Tanner. A 70 page introduction! I gave up on that after about 20 pages and just read the novel. Maybe the intro may have explained why it's a classic but seriously, 70 pages to introduce a book?

As Christopher said ...

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It's considered a classic largely because of its portrayal of 1920s America.


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« Reply #696 on: July 09, 2011, 06:12:22 AM »



Freedom by Jonathan Franzen
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« Reply #697 on: July 09, 2011, 02:32:53 PM »



I couldn't put this down. Totally absorbing and absoluting terrifing how one man had so much power over so many people including Presidents. The only weapon he ever carried in his career was blackmail. If you critisied the FBI or Hoover himself, you were hounded, they had a file on you and if you had skeletons in the closet, especially if it included sordid details with women that was used against you.

Also delves into Hoover's private life obviously and whether it's all true who knows but the author claims that it was blackmail that the Mob used against Hoover in the 50's and 60's about his private life that was why the FBI was reluctant in the chase of these Mobsters. It was only after Bobby Kennedy became Hoover's boss that the war on the Mafia started to gather speed.

It will be interesting to see Clint's new film to see how Hoover is portrayed.

5/5.
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« Reply #698 on: July 09, 2011, 03:53:30 PM »

He looks just like Leo, too! :o
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« Reply #699 on: July 12, 2011, 09:17:00 AM »

The Outlet (1905) by Andy Adams

This is the story of a cattle drive from Medina County, Texas to Fort Buford (North Dakota) in 1884.  Tom Quirk, who has been up the trail three times before, is chosen as foreman for one of three herds headed for the fort to fill a beef contract.  Quirk's employer, Don Lovell, is a subcontractor to the winner of a government contract.  Due to a loophole in his contract, Mr. Lovell is left with three herds of cattle on his hands when the price of cattle falls.  After much maneuvering and attempts to rectify the situation before the 15th of September when the herds are due at Fort Buford, it all comes to a head on the scheduled day of delivery when the officers of the fort are faced with 20,000 cattle instead of the 10,000 they were expecting and two owners claiming to be delivering under sub-contracts from the same company.

Written by a man who had spent eight years as a traildriver in the 1880's, the stories ring true whether about dust, Dodge, dead cattle or the choosing of a horse for the remuda.  There is more use made of lawyers than of guns, but there is no lack of suspense to keep the reader interested.  The characters in this story will be familiar to readers who have previously read Adams' The Log of A Cowboy (1903), which is the story of Tom Quirk's first trip from Texas to Montana as a traildriver.

4/5.
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