News: Having trouble registering?  Please feel free to contact us at help[at]clinteastwood.org.  We will help you get an account set up.


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 42 43 [44] 45 46 ... 52 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Recent Books Read  (Read 199656 times)
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #860 on: December 14, 2012, 01:46:14 AM »



This was a complete departure from what I've been reading lately. It really makes you think about life and why God doesn't stop bad things happening in this world.

Quote
The Shack is a Christian novel by Canadian author William P. Young, a former office manager and hotel night clerk, published in 2007.[1] The novel was self-published but became a USA Today bestseller, having sold 1 million copies as of June 8, 2008.[2] It was the #1 paperback trade fiction seller on the New York Times best sellers list from June 2008 to early 2010,[3] in a publishing partnership with Hachette Book Group USA's FaithWords imprint (Hodder & Stoughton in the UK). In 2009 it was awarded the "Diamond Award" for sales over 10 million copies by the Evangelical Christian Publishers Association.[4]
 
The title of the book is a metaphor for “the house you build out of your own pain”, as Young explained in a telephone interview.[5] He also states to radio host talk show Drew Marshall that The Shack "is a metaphor for the places you get stuck, you get hurt, you get damaged...the thing where shame or hurt is centered."[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Shack

4/5.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #861 on: December 23, 2012, 12:58:21 PM »



Just couldn't get into this. I finished it as I always do no matter how much I'm not enjoying a book but I didn't find any of it interesting. Some days I'd start a chapter and I'd be hard pressed to remember what happened in the last chapter.

1/5.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6582



View Profile Email
« Reply #862 on: December 23, 2012, 02:02:54 PM »

I'd thought at some point I might try The Hobbit, but it sounds like I might not get through it either. Tolkien was an incredibly intelligent man, but I've never personally appreciated his sense of pacing in what little bit of his work I've read (I've only read part of Fellowship of the Ring). But yet I do know people who really, really love his work. Go figure. :idiot2:  (I'm kidding with that smiley, of course! :2funny:)
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #863 on: December 23, 2012, 02:17:53 PM »

In the 2012 Movie Discussion thread I was critical of the film makers making three films from a 310 page book. I'll revise that. It's only 280 pages. The last thirty are the first chapter of The Fellowship Of The Ring.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Lin Sunderland
Guest


Email
« Reply #864 on: December 23, 2012, 03:45:12 PM »

I didn't like The Hobbit and couldn't read it all. I didn't like the Lord of the Rings either, but my Dad loved them and tried a few times to get me to read the books.
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #865 on: February 10, 2013, 07:49:29 PM »




From the big bang theory (not the TV show) to chemistry, paleontology, astronomy, and physics. This book covers it all. I found it interesting but after a while I was having flashbacks to high school with a lot of it.

3/5.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
honkytonk man
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5



View Profile Email
« Reply #866 on: February 11, 2013, 08:21:13 AM »

Things The Grandchildren Should Know - Mark Oliver Everett

An account of the life and times of E, the creative force behind the band Eels.

A great read and insight into one of the most honest songwriters the world has seen and how he coped with whatever this cruel world threw at him.

If you ever need your flagging spirits jilted up a litle bit, give it a read.

Only book i've ever read in one sititng.
Logged

"it's what a man knows about himself inside that makes him afraid"
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #867 on: February 11, 2013, 09:45:02 AM »



I love history, especially when seen through the stories of individuals, so when I came across The Men That God Forgot by Richard Butler at a book sale, I thought I'd expand my knowledge.  Reading the story was a bittersweet experience as the subject matter was rather brutal and dismal.  However, there are moments of humor that kept me going and a couple of love stories to balance the horrible aspects.  Of course, they add to the tragedy that is the end of the story.  The whole story made me ponder what I would be willing to undergo to obtain freedom if I didn't have it, or keep it once I'd regained it.  I didn't really understand the choice of a title until I'd read the entire book.
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32269


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #868 on: February 11, 2013, 09:51:46 PM »

^ For those whose interest is whetted by the above, here's a brief review (contains spoilers):

Quote
In 1833 the hellhole Sarah Island penal settlement on the jungle-dense southwest coast of Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania) was finally judged to be too barbarous even for the soldiers guarding the prisoners, and was ordered closed. The last group of ten prisoners to leave overpowered their captors and left them behind while commandeering a frigate and sailing for liberty in Chile. Hard weather sank their ship but make port they did in Valdivia. First thrown in prison, they were released to become shipwrights and then settled down to the heavenly delights of Spanish culture and family life. Nonetheless, the British navy sought them out and all died or were shipped to the even more horrible penal settlement of Norfolk gland in the mid-Pacific. Butler tells his minor tale swiftly and colorfully, with adequate characterizations; it is fictionalized nonfiction, rather four-square and without the sweep of the great mutiny and escape novels.

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/richard-butler-6/the-men-that-god-forgot/
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #869 on: April 28, 2013, 06:43:56 PM »



OK, I'll be honest. I didn't read much of this book. I started to but it was written in a way that went way over my head. Sort of textbook style I suppose you could call it because it wasn't fun, it was like something from a film course. Even the chapter on Unforgiven didn't do it for me.

1/5.  :(
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6582



View Profile Email
« Reply #870 on: April 28, 2013, 06:55:01 PM »


Recently finished Placebo by Steven James. I enjoyed it a lot--James is a Christian author who tends to write thriller/suspense books that can be pretty dark. This was my first book of his I've read but it won't be the last. O0 Placebo is the first book in a new series of novels--his other novels center around an FBI agent.
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #871 on: April 28, 2013, 07:34:49 PM »

They sound like my cup of tea. Thanks for the heads up, Christopher. 8)
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
TWOMULES
Guest


Email
« Reply #872 on: April 28, 2013, 07:38:36 PM »



OK, I'll be honest. I didn't read much of this book. I started to but it was written in a way that went way over my head. Sort of textbook style I suppose you could call it because it wasn't fun, it was like something from a film course. Even the chapter on Unforgiven didn't do it for me.

1/5.  :(

Sk, I did read a review on this some time ago which said, " the genre tends to be a background to the articles rather than their central subject matter: they tend to be essays about Westerns rather than the Western" :(
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #873 on: April 28, 2013, 07:41:46 PM »

Sk, I did read a review on this some time ago which said, " the genre tends to be a background to the articles rather than their central subject matter: they tend to be essays about Westerns rather than the Western" :(

Thanks 2M. Thankfully it only cost a couple of dollars at one of the book stalls at a local Fete (Fair).
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3335



View Profile Email
« Reply #874 on: April 29, 2013, 10:02:46 AM »

The last book I read was "Healing of America: A Global Quest for Better, Cheaper and Fairer Health Care"  by T.R. Reid. The book was fantastic. Healthcare reform is one of my primary areas of interest, so I really enjoyed Reid's comparative analysis, and the breadth of coverage of material. Basically, the book is not only about how the United States healthcare system operates, but how others across the world do as well. As a measure of comparison, TR Reid goes to many of the countries that have universal healthcare (Taiwan, Germany, France, Switzerland, Japan, etc), and uses his shoulder problem and the treatments offered to him to compare our system to those around the world. One of the things that I found so interesting about our system is that American doctors recommended the most expensive option, and the most debilitating option, surgery, at a much higher rate than the doctors around the world. In most other systems, surgery was discussed as an option, and Reid was told that the system would pay for him to have the surgery if he wanted it. But the doctors of virtually every other country he visited told him that there were other treatments available that would likely be better for him, and that there were both less expensive options and less debilitating options that in his particular case would be better. They all said that in his case, surgery was not recommended. This was the exact opposite of what his doctors in the United States said. The reason this matters is obvious. We spend more than any other country in the world, yet our health outcomes are often not any better, and as the book points out, are often worse. If American doctors are routinely recommending more expensive options and more debilitating options when there are less expensive and less debilitating options available that are just as likely to benefit the patient, the implications for healthcare reform are numerous.

Reid does both a micro analysis of these systems, using his own particular case, and a macro-analysis of how each system operates. His book is a fascinating look at healthcare, and really helps to highlight what our system does well and what our system does poorly. It also really helps to illuminate some of the myths many Americans have about the healthcare systems of others. In particular he uses evidence to show that universal healthcare doesn't necessarily need to be socialized, and that even socialized systems have a lot more options and choice than many Americans believe that they do. The idea that universal healthcare systems are not all government run, and that they often have as much or more choice as what we have here in the states was illuminating to me. Whatever your view of healthcare reform, this really is a thought-provoking book that I would recommend highly to anyone who cares about the health and welfare of our citizens and who strives to understand how we can preserve what we do well and perfect what we do not. 
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 11:26:38 AM by AKA23 » Logged
Sylvie
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2172



View Profile Email
« Reply #875 on: June 01, 2013, 09:47:48 AM »

A book offered by my Friend Jacqueline for my 50th, a few days ago : my friend Lin. (with the  beautiful Rob Larson drawing) and Jacqueline exactly know what I like, and what I will cherish all my life long  ;) !
A good book concerning Clint Eastwood career ... as for the comments on his personnal life, I did not read them, as the affairs between people should only be discussed on a private level ... 

« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 01:20:09 AM by Sylvie » Logged

"If she looks back, that means she's interested . Come on now, give me a little look. One little glance back..."

2007 Movie journal
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #876 on: June 03, 2013, 03:33:38 AM »



An absolute delight. Film fans won't be disappointed with this. Follows Michael Caine's career right up to Harry Brown.

5/5.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #877 on: June 25, 2013, 09:05:19 PM »



I started reading The Good, the Bad, and Me back in January, but somehow got lost reading about a dozen other books.  It wasn't for lack of interest, just the difference between owning the book and having to return the others to the library within a specified time.  I picked it up again a couple of days ago and had it finished in a trice.  Mr. Wallach sounds like he'd be a lot of fun to sit and listen to.
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24838


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #878 on: September 10, 2013, 04:13:25 AM »



Very enjoyable and could come in handy on those trivia nights.

4/5.
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Hemlock
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2652



View Profile Email
« Reply #879 on: September 21, 2013, 01:45:37 PM »



http://jonesbo.com/#!/books/batman

Great book,great writer.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 42 43 [44] 45 46 ... 52 Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T