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Author Topic: Recent Books Read  (Read 199684 times)
KC
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« Reply #880 on: September 21, 2013, 05:46:29 PM »



http://jonesbo.com/#!/books/batman

Great book,great writer.

^ That was his first book.  I read it several months ago (in Norwegian), and I wasn't very impressed, but I'm willing to give him another try, since he seems to be so popular internationally. It seemed to me he was trying to do too much in one book. Also, I didn't like the way the most interesting character turned out to be the opposite of what you thought he was.

It does provide a couple of emphatic demonstrations of the Checkov's gun principle: If there's a guillotine established early on in a narrative, and that narrative is a crime story ... you can be pretty sure it's going to be a murder weapon before the story is done. And if your hero is established as a recovering alcoholic with extremely compelling reasons to regret his drunken past ... he'll fall of the wagon, spectacularly, before the last page is turned.

Also, some very nicely done Australian local color. I'd be curious to know what SK thinks of it.
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Hemlock
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« Reply #881 on: September 22, 2013, 11:14:06 AM »

^ That was his first book.  I read it several months ago (in Norwegian), and I wasn't very impressed.

Opinions varies  ;)
It was a bit simple I guess and as a main character being an alcoholic detective is way too often used but still something in Nesbø`s writing worked for me.I´ve been hearing about him for ages now (my sister loves his books as did my father),he is huge in Finland.
As I liked The Bat,I already bought his next three"Harry Hole" books and I´m reading The Cockroaches at the moment...still I can`t wait to start the book after it which is going to be just translated Lee Child`s Wanted Man  8)

Btw KC,"in Norwegian",really??That`s cool  O0
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 12:00:11 PM by Hemlock » Logged
KC
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« Reply #882 on: September 22, 2013, 11:49:29 AM »

Yeah, I read the Swedes and Norwegians in the original. Not Finnish, though! 

I just picked up Nesbø's third Harry Hole book, Rødstrupe ... Since The Cockroaches is set in Thailand, I decided I'd skip over that one for the moment and go to the next one, which is set back in Norway. Norwegian books are expensive, even as e-books!



A Wanted Man was great. I was a tad disappointed in Child's very latest, Never Go Back, which I just finished. It had a lot of enjoyable moments, though, and he does finally get to meet the woman he's been trying to catch up with through three books.



http://www.leechild.com/books/never-go-back/
« Last Edit: September 22, 2013, 11:51:55 AM by KC » Logged
Hemlock
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« Reply #883 on: September 22, 2013, 04:22:03 PM »

^Both Swedish and Norwegian ??? I can`t read or speak swedish even though it`s Finland`s second language and we`re tought in the school to speak swedish.So (even though this is going to be slightly off topic) what made you learn to read those particular languages,KC?

About Nesbø,as said I´ve mainly heard about his books and I´m only in the middle of his second but I´ve been told that they do get better book by book.
Also he made this non-Harry Hole book,Headhunters that was huge success in Scandinavia anyways and was also filmed  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1614989/?ref_=sr_1 If you`ve not seen it make an effort as it is really good one...have heard that there`s going to be an American remake soon  :-\

I´m a huge Lee Child fan and it`s killing me everytime to wait for next translated Reacher novel.Child`s book`s quality tends to vary for example I thought Bad Luck And Trouble was a bit naive and mediocre at the best but mainly his books,especially 61 hours and Worth Dying For has been great.

Still hate the fact that they choose Tom Cruise to play Reacher even though the film was quite decent.He is just wrong for the role.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 11:47:58 PM by Hemlock » Logged
KC
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« Reply #884 on: September 22, 2013, 07:10:22 PM »

^Both Swedish and Norwegian ??? I can`t read or speak swedish even though it`s Finland`s second language and we`re tought in the school to speak swedish.So (even though this is going to be slightly off topic) what made you learn to read those particular languages,KC?

Just curiosity, I guess ... I knew German, so it wasn't that much of a stretch to pick up Swedish and Norwegian, which have vocabularies similar to German, with grammar that's a lot more like English. Anyway, I had never bothered with crime fiction before I learned Swedish, but there are so many good Swedish authors in the genre that now I hardly read anything else.

In Norwegian, besides Nesbø, I really only know one good crime-genre author, an old favorite, Gunnar Staalesen, whose hero is the hard-boiled Bergen private eye Varg Veum.

I'll keep Headhunters (Hodejegerne, in Norwegian) in mind!

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Still hate the fact that they choose tom Cruise to play Reacher even though the film was quite decent.He is just wrong for the role.

I'm with you there. An OK film, entertaining enough and it did do fair justice to the original story. But Cruise isn't Jack Reacher. He just isn't.
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Jed Cooper
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« Reply #885 on: November 14, 2013, 09:26:28 AM »

The Elvis Presley I Knew: Beyond the Headlines and Scandal to the Heart of the Superstar (2013)

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I would have been duty-bound if I had recognized Elvis' alleged drug abuse

First, when a friend made me aware of this book I laughed at the cover.  The story behind it is Elvis befriended some Denver policemen and attended a funeral of one of their brothers in 1976 and dressed in police uniform so as not to draw attention to himself.  I know a lot about Elvis' career and personal life, but up until now don't recall ever hearing the author's name.  So, I scoffed and discarded the idea of ever reading his book. 

Second, the author's quote reprinted above.  Upon first reading it my reaction was sure, point the finger away from you, like just about everybody else has done.  Unfortunately, blind fans tend to blame everyone but the one person responsible for Elvis' death... Elvis!  Still, I find it unnerving that family, friends and many others that had come to know Elvis either casually or personally feel the need to state & restate, "Hey, it wasn't my fault."  I'd have a lot more respect for those who would just admit to hanging around Elvis for a free meal ticket, enjoying all the fringe benefits and ignoring the fact that Elvis was dependent on prescribed medicine.  A lot of those around him became addicted themselves.  I suppose I shouldn't be so judgmental because there may very well be those that have admitted to this; just because I haven't heard or seen it, doesn't mean it hasn't happened.  It's just that I've seen most point the fingers away from themselves.  Again, it's primary Elvis' own fault and only secondary that those closest to him couldn't or wouldn't do more but I'm getting off topic....

I found Robert C. Cantwell's book an interesting read.  I did it in one sitting.  A friend loaned me the book yesterday and once the kids were asleep I began reading and didn't put it down until I was finished.  I kept Mr. Cantwell's quote in mind throughout, waiting to see if there was some indication of untruth to it.  There wasn't.  He did a good job in recounting all of his professional and personal meetings with Elvis.  Some of the items reproduced in the book could've been clearer, but that's the only minor drawback.  Well, besides the cover... I still don't like it!
 


 
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KC
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« Reply #886 on: November 14, 2013, 08:33:10 PM »

What does that quote even mean? Is it even English? ???

You can be duty-bound TO do something, i.e. your (legal or moral) duty obliges you to do it. But you can't be duty-bound "if" anything.

If he's trying to say his duty obliged him TO DO something in regard to recognizing "Elvis' alleged drug abuse" ... just what would it be? To recognize it, that is acknowledge it, in print? And if it's only "alleged" ... how can one recognize, that is see/notice/understand it? Or does he mean his duty obliged him to recognize that others have alleged that Elvis abused drugs? Or that in his personal relationship with Elvis, his duty would have/could have/should have obliged him to recognize that Elvis did, in fact, abuse drugs, as others alleged (and do what in consequence)?

I feel quite dizzy. (And I really don't care what the answer is, so don't bother, Jed.)
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KC
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« Reply #887 on: November 14, 2013, 08:36:32 PM »

Yeah, I read the Swedes and Norwegians in the original. Not Finnish, though! 

I just picked up Nesbø's third Harry Hole book, Rødstrupe ... Since The Cockroaches is set in Thailand, I decided I'd skip over that one for the moment and go to the next one, which is set back in Norway. Norwegian books are expensive, even as e-books!




I finished Rødstrupe a while back. I really liked it, much better than his first book. It was a very complex tale and he kept juggling all the various parts in a believable way, while keeping you guessing the answer to the mystery almost to the end.

I'd like to continue with the saga of Harry Hole, but Norwegian e-books are so expensive compared with Swedish! I think I'll stick to Svenska for a while.
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« Reply #888 on: November 15, 2013, 09:48:47 AM »

What does that quote even mean? Is it even English? ???

You can be duty-bound TO do something, i.e. your (legal or moral) duty obliges you to do it. But you can't be duty-bound "if" anything.

If he's trying to say his duty obliged him TO DO something in regard to recognizing "Elvis' alleged drug abuse" ... just what would it be? To recognize it, that is acknowledge it, in print? And if it's only "alleged" ... how can one recognize, that is see/notice/understand it? Or does he mean his duty obliged him to recognize that others have alleged that Elvis abused drugs? Or that in his personal relationship with Elvis, his duty would have/could have/should have obliged him to recognize that Elvis did, in fact, abuse drugs, as others alleged (and do what in consequence)?

I feel quite dizzy. (And I really don't care what the answer is, so don't bother, Jed.)

Others may, so here's my take on what's trying to be conveyed...

Basically, the author is saying (has said in his book) that he never witnessed Elvis abusing prescription drugs.  If he had, he would have been "duty bound" to act on it since he was an officer of the law.  As we all know, you can't believe everything you read in print so just because he states he was never witness to such abuse, doesn't necessarily mean it's true.  Either he truly never did and the quote reiterates that or he did and the quote is used to deceive and give the author a clear conscience.  After reading the book I couldn't give an honest opinion either way.  What I got from it was some interesting stories and rare photographs I'd never seen before. 
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KC
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« Reply #889 on: November 15, 2013, 09:01:15 PM »

OK, so he left out two little words after "duty-bound" ... namely "to act."

I'm glad that's cleared up.
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« Reply #890 on: November 17, 2013, 12:21:30 PM »

I finished Rødstrupe a while back. I really liked it, much better than his first book. It was a very complex tale and he kept juggling all the various parts in a believable way, while keeping you guessing the answer to the mystery almost to the end.

I'd like to continue with the saga of Harry Hole, but Norwegian e-books are so expensive compared with Swedish! I think I'll stick to Svenska for a while.

Good to know about "Rödstrupe" as it`s going to be my next Nesbö/Hole novel.
I´ve been told that these Harry Hole-novels get better one after another.So I guess KC you can`t go wrong if you`ll keep readin them.

About Lee Child`s Wanted Man I think it started as good as usual but the ending was a bit too simple with Reacher just killing everybody in sight  ::) Still enjoyable to read and I´m looking forward to get my hands to next(translated) Child/Reacher book.

Now I´m about to start Kevin Wignall`s The Dark Flag as I liked very much his Who Is Conrad Hirst.



http://www.kevinwignall.com/#/dark-flag/4556392369
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« Reply #891 on: December 15, 2013, 11:51:12 AM »



This was a great read. Not just about Adam Scott but Jason Day and Marc Leishman's quest to be the first Australian to win the Masters. All three were in contention this year but it was Scott who would go down in the history books as the very first Aussie to don the green jacket.

Goes into detail about all three players, not just over the four days of the tournament but they're whole golfing life. I found it so easy to read.

5/5.
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« Reply #892 on: January 02, 2014, 01:42:57 PM »

One Man Tango by Anthony Quinn with Daniel Paisner, 1994.  My dad loaned me this book and truth be told, didn't think I'd even bother.  Once I started, I quickly became addicted.  Very interesting and enjoyable.

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« Reply #893 on: January 02, 2014, 03:32:01 PM »

Eyewitness - Don Reid(1973)

Don Reid was a journalist that watched 189 men die in the electric chair in the Huntsville Texas Penitentiary. This book is not an easy read due to subject nature but is is good so far.
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« Reply #894 on: February 07, 2014, 08:49:41 PM »



I finished this a couple of weeks ago. It's the follow up to Betty Mahmoody's book, Not Without My Daughter. You may remember the movie with Sally Field that was made based on it. This was a tough read. It went into such detail about other women in the States that have had the same troubles when their husbands decide to return to their homeland for a so called vacation, only to tell their wives that after the two weeks he's not leaving and the children are staying too.

This took ages to read, somedays it felt like I read 30 pages but it was only about half a dozen. It kept me interested but not something I'd read again.

3/5.
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« Reply #895 on: March 13, 2014, 09:55:40 PM »



The 13th Joe Pickett book. Unfortunately, this was probably my least favorite so far. So disappointing.

2/5.
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« Reply #896 on: March 16, 2014, 08:06:41 AM »



Quite entertaining  O0

...and before that I read Nesbö`s Rødstrupe which was really good too.
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« Reply #897 on: March 23, 2014, 03:53:36 PM »



I highly recommend this one. One of the funniest books I've read in years. If you grew up in the USA in the 1950's, you'll love it. If you didn't, you'll still love it.

5/5.
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« Reply #898 on: March 24, 2014, 12:58:55 AM »

Recently read The Art Of Racing In The Rain, author Garth Stein.

It is a unique novel, written from the perspective of a dog owned by a professional racing driver. Animal lovers will really enjoy it, I believe.
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« Reply #899 on: March 28, 2014, 04:23:30 AM »



The President and the Provocatuer by Alex Cox..

I've only ever been vaguely aware of the conspiricy theory's behind Presedent Kennedy's assasignation..
So I found this a very enjoyable and interesting read... Cox has spent almost a lifetime studying all the information available and reading all the books and transcripts..and then takes a detailed look at both Kennedy's and Oswalds lives, sticking to the facts, exposing the lies and faked photographs..
The book is lean, full of clarity and insight.. no wild claims or fantasy.. just the facts.. I really enjoyed it..
Cox maybe known to some of you as the director of Repo Man amongst other films..


Anyone else here interested in this subject.. ?

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