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Author Topic: Led Zeppelin Appreciation Thread  (Read 14693 times)
The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2006, 04:40:22 AM »

That "Ahh Ahh Ahh" that is sung a couple of times in The Immigrant song reminded me a lot of the opening music in Magnum Force.

Another three good songs,Doug.Keep them coming. O0

What's your opinion of the film The Song Remains The Same? Is it just a concert film or is there more to it? It's being shown on cable here next month,is it worth taping?
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« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2006, 05:57:01 AM »


What's your opinion of the film The Song Remains The Same? Is it just a concert film or is there more to it? It's being shown on cable here next month,is it worth taping?

It's basically a concert film, recorded over two nights at Madison Square Garden, but each member of the band has his own segment that fits his personality.  So John Bonham, during the song "Moby Dick," is shown racing cars, while the other three members all have their segments, too, and they're all more fantasy-based.  The coolest moment is at the beginning when Peter Grant, their road manager and a thug himself, is shown as a ganster -- it's pretty weird.  And then the band had $200,000 stolen out of a hotel safe, and there's footage of the questioning of that, but overall it's a concert film.

 Until very recently it was the only officially released footage of Zeppelin in concert (there were bootlegs with poor sound quality), and it wasn't really them at their best.  Their concerts typically ran upwards to three hours, so the selection of songs is reduced to their grandest numbers, and leaves out their whole acoustic set and a lot of shorter, rocking songs, so we have an almost half-hour version of "Dazed and Confused," a twelve minute version of "Moby Dick," a twelve minute version of "No Quarter," and a fourteen minute version of "Whole Lotta Love."

I only point this out because you may be disappointed in the film, as I was when I first saw it.  If you can ever get a hold of the DVD Led Zeppelin, you will be much more impressed.  The picture and sound are exceptional, and it has footage of them in concert from the early days to very late in their career, and it's all great.

As well, now available on CD, are BBC Sessions and How the West Was Won, a three CD collection recorded June of 1972.

 
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« Reply #22 on: February 25, 2006, 06:47:15 AM »

An all acoustic set.  "Gallows Pole" is the only other song besides "Immigrant Song" that receives any airplay from their third album, and not much at that.  "That's the Way" is my favorite song off of the album, and "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" Robert wrote for his dog.   :)



EDIT: THESE LINKS ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Gallows Pole (Traditional, arr. by Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)
That's the Way (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)
Bron-Y-Aur Stomp (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant & John Paul Jones)

Note: The links to these mp3's will only be available for a few days, and I will edit this post to indicate when they are no longer working.


« Last Edit: February 28, 2006, 07:01:24 AM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: February 25, 2006, 11:13:00 AM »

I agree with Doug about Zepp's third record. It is one of my personal favorites. The songs on that record have not got the air play that Zepp's 1,2 and 4 have throughout the years with the exception of Immigrant Song. Several others that are great from that album are Celebration Day,Since I've Been Loving You, and Tangerine.
My other favorite Zepp album is Physical Graffiti. It came out as a two record set with a new creative side from the mighty Zepp. Some of the great songs are Kashmir, Ten Years Gone and The Rover which is in my opinion one of the greatest Zepp tunes ever.
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« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2006, 07:36:11 AM »

Led Zeppelin’s fourth album was released November 8, 1971.


Quite simply it is their masterpiece.  It’s the album which features “Stairway to Heaven,” the one song most every one can name of Led Zeppelin’s, and the song which consistently tops classic rock station’s “number one song of all-time” lists.  Although that honor has grown less frequent in recent years simply because the song has been played so many times on rock stations that, well, people have grown tired of it.  Nonetheless, the song is quite an achievement, everything aside, and how I wish I could take away a few hundred playings of that song so that I could once again appreciate all its grandeur and beauty.  And unless someone really, really wants to hear the song because they don’t know it, I won’t even bother posting a link to it.  Overall, it’s hard to comprehend how one band over the course of writing and recording one album could have come up with so many incredible songs.  It’s easy to become blase about the song list if you’re like me and you’ve heard these songs hundreds of times flipping the LP over and over again as a teenager and then over the years having heard the songs countless other times on the radio, but even so, if I’m in the car and catch on the radio “Black Dog,” or “Rock and Roll” or “When the Levee Breaks,” or any of the magical songs on this album, I'm cranking up the volume and for those few minutes I'm transported to a whole other world.

Not only is the music on this album incredible, but it’s the whole mystique of the album that captures you and transports you.  First of all, there’s no mention of Led Zeppelin on the album cover -- what you get instead is simple artwork that is both dark and enigmatic.  You open up the original album cover and there is an ominous depiction of The Hermit, from the Tarot deck.  Those diehard, impressible teens buying the album have now been presented with mysteries to solve and images to take on as their own.  The listener is being welcomed into a whole other realm of existence.  And then there are the symbols that represent the title of the album, symbols that were inspired by the occult, whose meanings are open for all kinds of interpretation and speculation.  Even the title of the album is a mystery.  It's been called by many titles, including “Led Zeppelin IV” (the most sensible title), “Zoso” (based on the symbol for Jimmy Page), “Untitled,” “Four Symbols,”  and “Runes,” to name the most common.  Its proper title, of course, is  the esoteric symbols that are impossible to duplicate on any keyboard, representing all four members of the band.  However, Led Zeppelin IV will do. 

The album followed the disappointing (to many) album Led Zeppelin III, and has gone on to sell 22-plus million copies worldwide, making it one of the top selling albums of all-time.  Despite all of the overplay this album has received on the radio, I still love, and get thrilled by, the songs on this album.  No, it’s not my “favorite” album of Led Zeppelin, but it’s the one that still continues to amaze me more than any other.  It’s the standard by which all hard rock/heavy metal must be judged, and I don’t ever see it being topped -- the bar is just too high. 

Pictures:

The complete album cover when opened up:



The inside album cover (sorry, this is the only picture I could find on the internet and what is impossible to see in this picture is the man bowing down at the foot of the mountain before "The Hermit"):



The “four symbols” (each representing a member of the band, in this order: Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, Robert Plant):







EDIT: THESE LINKS ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Black Dog (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant & John Paul Jones)
Rock and Roll (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones & John Bonham)
The Battle of Evermore (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant) (Guest singer: Sandy Denny)
Misty Mountain Hop (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant & John Paul Jones)
Going to California (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)
When the Levee Breaks ((Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham, Memphis Minnie)

Note: The links to these mp3's will only be available for a few days, and I will edit this post to indicate when they are no longer working.



The song list:

1. Black Dog
2. Rock And Roll
3. The Battle Of Evermore
4. Stairway To Heaven
5. Misty Mountain Hop
6. Four Sticks
7. Going To California
8. When The Levee Breaks
« Last Edit: March 08, 2006, 07:49:39 AM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: March 03, 2006, 06:47:54 AM »

Houses of the Holy, their fifth album and the first one with a proper title, was released March 28, 1973.


Once again the album cover has nothing on it to indicate the band or the name of the album.  It’s a great album, one that captures the band experimenting and yet still doing what they do best -- but I must admit, it’s one of their albums that hasn’t held up as well for me personally.  Two of the songs, “Over the Hills and Far Away” and “D’yer Mak’er” were singles in the U.S.  They never released any singles in England and were never happy with the idea of singles that came off of albums as they saw the two as separate.



EDIT: THESE LINKS ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Over the Hills and Far Away (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)
D'yer Mak'er (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones & John Bonham)
The Ocean (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones & John Bonham)

Note: The links to these mp3's will only be available for a few days, and I will edit this post to indicate when they are no longer working.




The song list:

1. The Song Remains The Same
2. The Rain Song
3. Over The Hills And Far Away
4. The Crunge
5. Dancing Days
6. D'Yer Mak'er
7. No Quarter
8. The Ocean
« Last Edit: March 08, 2006, 06:33:12 PM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: March 03, 2006, 10:09:03 AM »

I really like Houses Of The Holy with the exceptions of D'yer Mak'er and Dancing Days. Robert  Plant could still hit the high notes well on this album. I have a mint copy of Houses on vinyl :) and it sounds so much better than the CD.
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« Reply #27 on: March 04, 2006, 06:36:57 AM »

I have another song off of Houses of the Holy, “Dancing Days” (sorry, Richard Earl, I already had the song uploaded before I read your post -- though I had been thinking of “The Crunge” because it’s just so unlike anything Led Zeppelin ever recorded). 

The other song “No Quarter” was originally off of Houses of the Holy, but this version was recorded by Page and Plant in 1994, and it is a complete reworking of the song, so it bares no resemblance to the original version.  It comes off the album No Quarter: Jimmy Page & Robert Plant Unledded, and most of the songs on the album (except, I think, one) were featured in a special that first aired on MTV’s “Unplugged.”   I recorded it off of TV way back in the day, and only now thought to look to see if it’s available on DVD, which of course it is -- so you know what I’ll be purchasing here soon.  In a way the album they recorded together does a great job of capturing the true spirit of Led Zeppelin, only in a very toned down way.  The album/TV special features a couple of reworked Led Zeppelin songs, several songs recorded for a live performance, and some brand new songs they wrote together.  For some odd reason, the CD contains one new song not on the special and the special contains one new song not on the CD (called “Wah Wah” and it’s a really good song -- I also notice on the DVD a track called “The Truth Explodes” that’s not on the CD, and was not on the original special I have recorded, and I’m guessing it also was a newly written song by Page and Plant).  Anyway, the music off of No Quarter has guest musicians from all over the world (though mostly from India), giving their old and new songs a very “world music” feel, something they were into from way back.  To get a better description of the project, check out No Quarter at amazon.com.



EDIT: THESE LINKS ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Dancing Days (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)
No Quarter (from Page & Plant Unledded) (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant & John Paul Jones)


« Last Edit: March 09, 2006, 06:13:41 PM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #28 on: March 04, 2006, 07:16:47 AM »

Talking about the No Quarter project made me remember a Led Zeppelin bootleg I'd found on the Internet several years ago of a recording Jimmy Page and Robert Plant had made in Bombay, India in 1972 just before they began work on the Houses of the Holy album.  They'd gone to Bombay and found local musicians with the idea of blending western and eastern music, and recorded two songs, "Friends" and "Four Sticks," off of III and IV, respectively.  They never released the songs, as they'd just wanted to try the experiement.  I have never heard the version of "Four Sticks" but I did find a version of "Friends," recorded in Bombay 1972.  The No Quarter project appropriately would feature both "Friends" and "Four Sticks."



EDIT: THESE LINKS ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Friends (Bombay '72) (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)


« Last Edit: March 09, 2006, 06:14:03 PM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: March 05, 2006, 04:38:35 AM »

Listening to all these tracks that Doug has posted and the 3 CD's I borrowed,I would have to say that Led Zeppelin sound a lot better than I thought they would.I always thought they were heavy metal and nothing else,but there are some good tracks I've heard that are nowhere near being classed as heavy metal.
This thread has definitely made me appreciate this group more than I did.Thanks Doug. O0
Doug,the song "Wah Wah" that you mentioned,is that a cover of the George Harrison song?
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« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2006, 05:55:40 AM »

Listening to all these tracks that Doug has posted and the 3 CD's I borrowed,I would have to say that Led Zeppelin sound a lot better than I thought they would.I always thought they were heavy metal and nothing else,but there are some good tracks I've heard that are nowhere near being classed as heavy metal.
This thread has definitely made me appreciate this group more than I did.Thanks Doug. O0
Doug,the song "Wah Wah" that you mentioned,is that a cover of the George Harrison song?

I'm glad you're enjoying the thread, tgy.  I was beginning to wonder if anybody was paying any attention to it.  As for the song "Wah Wah," no, it is an original compostion by Page/Plant.  In concert Led Zeppelin played covers of just about anybody, including The Beatles and Elvis Presley, but on the records they generally only covered blues (credited or uncredited  ::)). 

Here are the lyrics (and they sound like they could have been written by George).  The "wah wah" part is chanted by a guest singer.

Quote
Ooh, ooh
From my island home I feel a chance
Kiss the tired ghost
Of time and circumstance

Ooh,
So give me peace of mind and let me dance
And bury all my pain of years beneath the sand
I said, ooh, ooh

[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah] ...
Omrah heals, his wings I'd gladly wear
Laughing to the face
Of my anger and despair

[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah] ...

Ooh, ooh
Give me peace of mind and lay me down
And bury all the pain of years beneath the sand
[Wah-wah]
Oh yeah
[Wah-wah] ...

[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah] ...

Oh, so give me peace of mind and lay me down
And bury all my pain in years beneath the sand
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah] ...

Omrah heals, his wings I gladly wear
Laughing to the face of anger and despair
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah]
[Wah-wah] ...
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« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2006, 06:05:27 AM »

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Quarter:_Jimmy_Page_and_Robert_Plant_Unledded:

Quote
No Quarter is a live album by Jimmy Page and Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant, released by Atlantic Records on October 14, 1994. The long awaited reunion between Page and Plant occurred on a 90 minute "UnLedded" MTV project, recorded in Morocco, Wales, and London, which rated highly on network television. It was not a reunion of Led Zeppelin, however, as former bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones was not present. Jones later commented that he was unhappy with Plant and Page naming the album, since the namesake was a Led Zeppelin song that was largely his work.

In addition to acoustic numbers there is a heavy World music reworking of Led Zeppelin classics along with four Middle Eastern influenced songs: "City Don't Cry," "Yallah," "Wonderful One," and "Wah Wah".

The album was #4 on debut on the Billboard's Pop Albums chart.

Track listing
"Nobody's Fault But Mine" (Page/Plant) 4:06
"Thank You" (Page/Plant) 5:47
"No Quarter" (Jones/Page/Plant) 3:45
"Friends" (Page/Plant) 4:37
"Yallah" (Page/Plant) 4:59
"City Don't Cry" (Page/Plant) 6:08
"Since I've Been Loving You" (Jones/Page/Plant) 7:29
"Battle of Evermore" (Page/Plant) 6:41
"Wonderful One" (Page/Plant) 4:57
"That's the Way" (Page/Plant) 5:35
"Gallows Pole" (trad arr Page/Plant) 4:09
"Four Sticks" (Page/Plant) 4:52
"Kashmir" (Page/Plant/Bonham) 12:27
"Wah Wah" was included as bonus on some editions of the album after "That's The Way".

Total album length: 79:32 minutes.


[Emphasis added.]  Unfortunately, it's not a bonus track on the album I own!

Actually, John Paul Jones wasn't happy about not being asked to participate in the project, and apparently made a crack about it when Led Zeppelin was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame only a short while after they'd released No Quarter, something about he was glad they (as in Page and Plant) had remembered his phone number this time.
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« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2006, 05:37:34 PM »

I'm glad you're enjoying the thread, tgy.  I was beginning to wonder if anybody was paying any attention to it.

We are, Doug! I'm finding it all great, man! I'm just quiet because I'm reading it and learning from it, thanks for all the info and work!  O0
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« Reply #33 on: March 05, 2006, 06:58:54 PM »

I'm enjoying reading the thread too, Doug! It's always nice to broaden your horizons. Thanks for all the work you're putting into this! 8)
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« Reply #34 on: March 08, 2006, 08:13:11 AM »

There is a fable that the great bluesman Robert Johnson went to the crossroads one night and had his guitar tuned by the devil, giving up his soul in order to play the guitar like no one had believed possible.  Appropriately, because Led Zeppelin were huge fans of Robert Johnson, the same fable would be attached to Led Zeppelin, that perhaps they’d made a pact with the devil in order to achieve worldwide fame and all the trappings of a rock band.  Silly, of course.  But by 1975, Led Zeppelin was the biggest rock band in the world, not only selling out stadiums wherever they played, but in fact breaking attendance records that had been set by The Beatles almost a decade earlier. 

And in fact Jimmy Page had long held an avid interest in the occult, even going so far as to buy Aleister Crowley’s former house on the shore of Loch Ness.  The group’s appetite for women, drink, drugs, and general excess was legendary, a path that had destroyed many a musician’s life before them, and setting a dangerous standard for rock bands to follow.  In fact they were cementing the stereotype of what a heavy metal should be: Robert Plant, the flamboyant vocalist and sex maniac with the long blond tresses; Jimmy Page, the seemingly fragile and mysterious guitar wizard, interested in the occult and drugs; John Paul Jones, the serious bass player, who holds everything together; and John Bonham, the working man's drummer, the sensitive family man at home who became an immature wild man on the road, who could turn into the “beast” when he started drinking -- and he drank all the time.

In 1975 Led Zeppelin were on top of the world.  They were protected by the brutish manager Peter Grant and a thug of a road manager Richard Cole, and addiction and tragedy had not yet struck the band.  They were about to prove yet again that they were the best and hardest rocking band in the world with the release of an epic double-album.  And the album would be released on their own label, Swan Song, the logo of which was inspired by a painting of the Greek god Apollo.




To be continued ....

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« Reply #35 on: March 08, 2006, 08:49:02 AM »

All photos from http://www.led-zeppelin.org/index.php


Jimmy Page:






Robert Plant:




John Paul Jones:



John Bonham:





Led Zeppelin live:



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« Reply #36 on: March 08, 2006, 07:20:59 PM »

Physical Graffiti was released February 24, 1975. 


The double-album included eight new songs recorded for the album and seven songs left over from previous album sessions, including “Houses of the Holy,” inexplicably left off the album of the same name.  Physical Graffiti is probably my favorite Zeppelin album.  I’ve heard some people say that the album is too self-indulgent, with too many filler songs, and that it could have been a brilliant album if only it’d been cut it to a single album (does that point-of-view sound familiar, Beatle fans?).  But while it’s true it contains songs that for one reason or another were left off the original album they were recorded for, I wouldn’t call any of those songs rejects.  Well, certainly not “The Rover” or “Houses of the Holy,” both intended for the Houses of the Holy album, or “Bron-Yr-Aur,” a short beautiful guitar piece, or “Down by the Seaside,”intended for Led Zeppelin III.  All of those songs could have actually made the respective albums better had they been included, but perhaps because of tone or sound or just a desire to include the songs they did put out on those albums, those songs were left off.  “Night Flight” and “Boogie with Stu” were both written for the Led Zeppelin IV session and understandably left off -- there were too many other better songs to put on the album.  And “Black Country Woman,” the only acoustic song on Physical Graffiti, and probably the raunchiest blues song Led Zeppelin recorded, was recorded for Houses of the Holy, but the song simply didn’t fit on that album. 


These three songs constitute Side Two of the original Physical Graffiti double-LP.
   


EDIT: THESE LINKS ARE NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Houses of the Holy (Jimmy Page & Robert Plant)
Trampled Under Foot (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant & John Paul Jones)
Kasmir (Jimmy Page, Robert Plant & John Bonham)

Note: The links to these mp3's will only be available for a few days, and I will edit this post to indicate when they are no longer working.




The Song List:

1. Custard Pie
2. The Rover
3. In My Time Of Dying
4. Houses Of The Holy
5. Trampled Under Foot
6. Kashmir

1. In The Light
2. Bron-Yr-Aur
3. Down By The Seaside
4. Ten Years Gone
5. Night Flight
6. The Wanton Song
7. Boogie With Stu
8. Black Country Woman
9. Sick Again
« Last Edit: March 13, 2006, 06:05:09 PM by Doug » Logged

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« Reply #37 on: March 08, 2006, 08:05:10 PM »

Something I love about Physical Graffiti is that there is so much creativity in the songwriting for this record. No song sounds like any other and the flow of the album works very well.
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« Reply #38 on: March 08, 2006, 11:14:18 PM »

Great pics Doug. O0
That song Kashmir,I've heard that somewhere recently but can't remember where.It may have only been the very beginning of the song,but for the life of me,I can't remember where I heard it.
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« Reply #39 on: March 09, 2006, 07:37:55 AM »

Something I love about Physical Graffiti is that there is so much creativity in the songwriting for this record. No song sounds like any other and the flow of the album works very well.

I agree.  That's why I couldn't imagine anyone suggesting it be anything but a double album. 

Great pics Doug. O0
That song Kashmir,I've heard that somewhere recently but can't remember where.It may have only been the very beginning of the song,but for the life of me,I can't remember where I heard it.

Well, "Kasmir" has been a hugely popular song over the years, so if you've ever for any moment tuned into a hard rock/classic rock station, you would have heard it.  If you've ever seen Fast Times at Ridgemont High, there's a scene where Damone is giving his pointers on how to impress a girl that goes: "When it comes down to making out, whenever possible, put on side one of Led Zeppelin IV."  And "Kasmir" (which, of course, is not off of Led Zeppelin IV) comes on as it cuts to the next scene.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2006, 05:54:26 PM by Doug » Logged

"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
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