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Author Topic: The Outlaw Josey Wales the Greatest of 2 Decades?  (Read 5072 times)
philamopolis
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« on: May 28, 2006, 07:24:08 PM »

If you look at movies from a historical perspective, the western genre is our oldest genre, from the 1890's-1960's they made a ton of westerns not only in Hollywood but all over the world, from Hollywood Westerns to the Spaghetti Westerns to Macaroni Westerns. From John Ford to Akira Kurosawa to Sergio Leone. From Gary Cooper to John Wayne to Clint Eastwood. Loads of westerns came out of the 1890's-1910's. Most of these weren't even 60 minutes but they were great entertainment for that time. As the silent era really took off we got some really good westerns out of the 1920's, ones like The Virginian. The 1930's produced even better westerns, they made  a lot during that era from the Lonestar/John Wayne westerns to The Plainsman to Stagecoach, Way Out West and Destry Rides Again. The 1940's got some great westerns but really that era wasn't dominated by the west, but we did get movies like The Westerner, The Ox-Bow Incident, Red River and Fort Apache. The 1950's produced so many westerns, really between the fifties and the sixties and all the TV series westerns like Rawhide and Wanted Dead or Alive to 1950 movies like High Noon, The Searchers, Winchester '73 and Rio Bravo and the sixties with Eastwood's westerns to westerns like The Magnificent Seven, Hombre, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and How the West Was Won we got so many great westerns from those eras, but of course with the good comes the bad.

There were a lot of bad westerns being made during the '50's & '60's and with all the westerns being made the general public became bored and wanted something different, that's when we got movies like Dirty Harry or Marathon Man and as the seventies came westerns were like box office poison, nobody wanted to see them anymore, we did get some good ones in the early '70's, ones like Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid, Duck You Sucker and High Plains Drifter but by the time Eastwood was ready to make Josey Wales everybody was telling him not to... Well we all know that story, so here's my point,

Between the late '70's and into the '80's from the time Josey Wales was made there wasn't really any great follow up, we got Silverado, Pale Rider and Young Guns but nothing that resembled the greatness from Josey Wales. Then of course we got Dances with Wolves and Unforgiven so that started a new generation but from the seventies and eighties Josey was really the most popular western, heck Tom Cruise loves Josey Wales and has ever since he seen it originally in the theatres, this film really spoke to the younger audience and it was the representation of what a good western was and was a favorite for so long to so many, now if you look at it today the one western that represents the genre to an average movie goer is Unforgiven.

Anyway, my question is what do you think about Josey Wales's legacy during the seventies and eighties? What was it like seeing it for the first time in '76? Just anything, anybody agree with me, this is one of the greatest westerns so lets discuss!
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Perry
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2006, 05:18:34 PM »



      You know it's funny, I saw Josey Wales 3 times  in 2 weeks when it came out in 76'. I thought it was a tremendous movie and i still think it's Eastwood's best movie. There were so many things about it that certainly grabbed your attention and Eastwood was bigger than life in that movie. There was also the presence of Chief Dan George who really should have been nominated for a supporting role. It was the first movie where I realized how great a director Eastwood was and it was the first time I started reading positive reviews for an Eastwood movie. I'll tell you something Orion I remember seeing the hype for that movie Silverado and thats all it was. That was the biggest piece of crap I ever saw. Heavens Gate was even better than that.
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Richard Earl
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2006, 08:01:04 PM »

I do agree that The Outlaw Josey Wales is the best western of the 70's-80's. High Plains Drifter is a distant second for me. The Outlaw Josey Wales still holds up as greatness as it did when it came out. It is kind of funny to me that there were westerns that I loved when I was a kid like The Long Riders. I watched it again for the first time in years and it was a terrible film. I am sure there are many more like it. I can watch ol' Josey Wales over and over. Knowing that Clint directed that one shows me that he knows the western film genre as well as anyone could ever do. Perry nailed it on the head about Clint directing that film.
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Perry
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2006, 03:31:36 PM »

 You know something Richard..I saw the Long Riders  2 times when it came out and I thought it was a great movie too. It kind of reminded you of the Sam Peckingpah style with all the slow motion.
I still think it still is a decent movie, but you know Josey Wales throws so much at you with the performances and the positive portrayal of Native Americans. We were always used to seeing Eastwood as a more stoic figure in the westerns, though it was still there you had more imfo on his character qnd who he was. All these things interlocked without being boring.
See, I like Unforgiven, but I just feel it drags in the middle. What the hell...it's all good.
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Richard Earl
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2006, 12:08:35 AM »

I as well love the portrayal of the Native Americans in The Outlaw Josey Wales. I do not know of any film before 1976 that shows them as humans rather then savages which I have seen in earlier Hollywood films. I loved Chief Dan George. He was serious and funny at the same time. I feel it was a heart felt performance by the man.
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2006, 02:59:48 PM »

i think it's obviously a great movie......but for me, in those two decades, i like "high plains drifter" the best.  i like "pale rider" more and "joe kidd" more.

while "the outlaw josey wales" has a deeper meaning and holds much more social relevance.......to me, the movies i mentioned have more pure entertainment value and more thrill.

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Perry
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2006, 11:26:11 AM »


It's really interesting how everyone rates those westerns. I always liked Joe Kidd. I think alot of dissapointment comes from the fact that If you look at the cast It prob should have been a better vehicle with Eastwood and Duvall. It's not a terrible movie. The only negative i have is I thought John Saxon was miscast. I always liked Don Stroud and James Wainwright. Don Stroud actually has a website (DonStroud.Com) and he mentions Eastwood. Jow Kidd is kind of a low key Western. I think it's a good flick.
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Agent
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« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2006, 06:21:31 AM »

Perry,

Two of the actors in Joe Kidd – Don Stroud and Paul Koslo, pay some high compliments to Eastwood in their interviews featured on the Psychotronic website. The website itself is a bit strange, but the personal interviews are fun to read, and they give a fascinating and down to earth insight on what it was like working on the set next to some of these legendary icons, such as Eastwood. Stroud, who was also in Coogan's Bluff, says:

Quote
"I’d rather do ten Clint Eastwood movies than do one regular studio movie."

I’ve mentioned Koslo’s hilarious account of the shenanigans that occurred on the set of Kidd in years past -- it’s good reading. It’s also interesting to see the contrast between two megastars of the day – Eastwood and Bronson, (Mr. Majestyk) and the contrast between the two personalities, and the blunt words Koslo shares on that.

OK…..back to our regularly scheduled programming… Josey Wales.  8)
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« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2006, 05:24:41 PM »

I've always been luke-warm on Westerns, but I saw Josey Wales at the recommendation of a friend and it is probably one of my top ten all-time movies.  Clint is great at being serious, while using dead-pan humor at the same time.  Chief Dan George was amazingly funny while still remaining realistic.  I know he had little or no acting experience, but his sense of timing was brilliant.  The story is powerful, the dialogue is entertaining, and the characters have depth.  I also like how it is one of few "War Between the States" movies that does justice to the 1860s South.
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Perry
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« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2006, 03:58:38 PM »



        Agent..Yeah I went in that site. It was pretty amusing. Koslo's a pretty interesting guy. i had forgotton he was in Majestyk. That guy always worked.
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Josey444
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« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2006, 07:32:56 PM »

Josey Wales is one of my favorite, if not my favorite Western, hence my user name.  :) I love everything about the film: Josey's deserved reputation as the quickest gunman around; the humor, including Josey's continual tobacco spitting, especially targeting the poor dog; the supporting cast, including Chief Dan George and John Vernon, plus the colorful characters such as Sim Carstairs the ferryman, Granny Hawkins the storekeeper, the carpetbagger, etc.; the dialogue, which is some of the best I've ever heard in a Western; Josey, despite preferring to go it alone, gaining a family along the way; the action set-pieces---I could go on and on.

I first saw this the year it came out at the drive-in. It wasn't a very brightly-lit print, but I loved it anyway. Saw it again at an indoor theater and loved it more. Now, on DVD, it looks better than ever. If you get the chance, buy it. The movie looks pristine and the extras are cool, including a "making of" from the time of the movie and a new "making of" with many of the cast and crew (including Clint, of course) recalling the movie and Clint calling it his favorite of his Westerns.
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« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2006, 08:39:43 AM »

josey wales may be the best western ever made,it's that good.the two greatest actors of my generation are clint and john wayne,both of them were famous for making westerns,but clint was the ace behind the camera the duke was'nt!
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Perry
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« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2006, 12:47:23 PM »


The only other movies before Josey Wales that showed the Native American is a more positive realm in some aspects were 'Cheyenne Autumn' with Candice Bergen and of course 'Little Big Man', that also has Dan George too.
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Philo Beddoe Jr
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« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2006, 08:38:09 PM »

The only other movies before Josey Wales that showed the Native American is a more positive realm in some aspects were 'Cheyenne Autumn' with Candice Bergen and of course 'Little Big Man', that also has Dan George too.

There are a few others, probably quite a few.

One that comes to mind immediately is Apache (1954) with Burt Lancaster.

WKC aka Darren.
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DJDave
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« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2006, 10:19:19 AM »

 8)








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