News: Now showing in theaters: CRY MACHO, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7] 8 9 ... 12 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Baseball 2007  (Read 43406 times)
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #120 on: August 29, 2007, 07:44:47 PM »

There's been quite a few celebs in the crowd the past two games.

My favorite was last night ... Tino Martinez. ;)
Logged
WeAllHaveItCominKid
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108


They got a sign on him in front of Greely's?


View Profile Email
« Reply #121 on: August 30, 2007, 10:07:34 AM »

My favorite was last night ... Tino Martinez. ;)

It's always nice to see Tino at the stadium!
Logged

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #122 on: August 30, 2007, 03:34:11 PM »

Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep!!! 
Logged
WeAllHaveItCominKid
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108


They got a sign on him in front of Greely's?


View Profile Email
« Reply #123 on: August 30, 2007, 06:23:57 PM »

Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep!!! 

YESSS!!!!

How bout Joba getting thrown out? hahaha do you think that was on purpose? Everyone seems to have a different opinion about this. I personally don't think it was.
Logged

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #124 on: August 30, 2007, 08:20:59 PM »

I listened to the kid's postgame interview and I really don't think it was on purpose. He seemed shocked to have been thrown out. He kept repeating how much respect he has for the Red Sox and Youkilis in particular. And really, what purpose would it possibly serve?

I think he was just overexcited because he had a chance to earn his first save.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2007, 08:36:59 PM by KC » Logged
Holden Pike
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2046


"If they move, kill 'em."


View Profile Email
« Reply #125 on: August 30, 2007, 09:50:17 PM »

Torre's plea for common sense regarding Chamberlin's two high pitches is the best argument there is. It just don't make no sense. I know the umpire isn't required to, but I think anybody else looking at it (and hopefully the Red Sox, after the heat of battle and the sting of the sweep have left after a couple days) will see there's just no logical reason for it. If it was a pitcher they had a history with and if the situation, both in the game and in the standings, were different, maybe. But that pitcher in that moment of that game, it just doesn't add up.

I think as calm and cool as he's been, KC is right in assessing that he just got overly excited and lost his control. His adrenaline got the better of his pin-point command. And if, as Youkilis commented after the game, they know Chamberlin has such great control, doesn't it then follow that if he were throwing at you you'd get a 98MPH heater in the small of your back, and not two of 'em three feet over your head and tailing toward New Jersey?

Lost in all the hubbub about Chamberlin and the running out of the baseline call in the seventh, Robbie Cano hit two tremendous blasts off Schilling the opposite way to nearly the deepest part of the park! The last time Schilling gave up two homers in a game to a lefty was some dude named Barry Lamar Bonds in that infamous/fabled year of 2001.


Anyway, three great games. Too bad Pettite, Rocket and Wang can't pitch every three games and have Joba and Mariano each get the last six or nine outs every time. I think with a start or two off Mussina can probably straighten himself out. It doesn't seem to be a physical thing, but mental. He's a pro, he'll get his stuff together in time for this stretch run. I hope, anyway.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2007, 09:51:45 PM by Holden Pike » Logged

"We're not gonna get rid of anybody. We're gonna stick together, just like it used to be. When you side with a man you stay with him, and if you can't do that you're like some animal, you're finished. We're all finished."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #126 on: August 30, 2007, 10:28:00 PM »

It'll be interesting to see how young Kennedy looks on Saturday.

I agree about Mussina. He was pitching very effectively in July; he didn't just fall off a cliff. He may not ever regain his old velocity but there are plenty of examples around the league of older pitchers who have reinvented themselves, starting right at home with one Roger Clemens.
Logged
Alcatraz
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1200



View Profile Email
« Reply #127 on: August 31, 2007, 04:12:31 PM »

I love it when the Red Sox get swept.   ;D
Logged

"Reality continues to ruin my life" - Calvin
Holden Pike
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2046


"If they move, kill 'em."


View Profile Email
« Reply #128 on: August 31, 2007, 04:20:24 PM »

OK, whatever on-the-field spur-of-the-moment decision the umps made regarding Chamberlin last night, that today the League has fined and suspended him on top of that is just plain ridiculous! The Yankees aren't going to fight it this time of year, especially since it's only a two-game suspension and, according to the Yankees' own internal "Joba Rules" he has to sit for two days if he pitches two innings anyway. I know he only barely started that second one before the ejection last night, but whatEVER.

HUGE overreaction on the part on MLB. Citing the "history" between the two clubs is silly. By that criteria, anything inside by either team's pitchers should result in automatic ejections, fines and suspensions.


Just plain ridiculous.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2007, 04:21:59 PM by Holden Pike » Logged

"We're not gonna get rid of anybody. We're gonna stick together, just like it used to be. When you side with a man you stay with him, and if you can't do that you're like some animal, you're finished. We're all finished."
WeAllHaveItCominKid
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108


They got a sign on him in front of Greely's?


View Profile Email
« Reply #129 on: August 31, 2007, 07:35:12 PM »

OK, whatever on-the-field spur-of-the-moment decision the umps made regarding Chamberlin last night, that today the League has fined and suspended him on top of that is just plain ridiculous! The Yankees aren't going to fight it this time of year, especially since it's only a two-game suspension and, according to the Yankees' own internal "Joba Rules" he has to sit for two days if he pitches two innings anyway. I know he only barely started that second one before the ejection last night, but whatEVER.

HUGE overreaction on the part on MLB. Citing the "history" between the two clubs is silly. By that criteria, anything inside by either team's pitchers should result in automatic ejections, fines and suspensions.


Just plain ridiculous.

I agree with you totally Holden Pike. I was shocked when I learned about the suspention. I mean come on, get real. I have no clue what Major Leauge Baseball is thinking. Under the situation Jaba was in, I do not think that was intentional. I think he was just caught up in the moment of Yankees/Redsox and was a little to pumped up. I dunno, it's just an odd situation.
Logged

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #130 on: September 01, 2007, 03:34:58 PM »

I complete agree with Holden. Total overreaction. I think the team should pass the hat to pay Joba's fine (think I read that it's $1,000).
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #131 on: September 01, 2007, 05:53:54 PM »

Quick everyone, rookie Clay Buchholz is pitching a NO HITTER for the Boston Red Sox in his second Major League start! Turn on your TVs!!!

(Yes, this is a jinx attempt! )
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #132 on: September 01, 2007, 06:14:20 PM »

Shucks, jinx didn't work. :(
Logged
WeAllHaveItCominKid
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108


They got a sign on him in front of Greely's?


View Profile Email
« Reply #133 on: September 01, 2007, 09:20:07 PM »

Boston can have their no hitter. We'll take the Championship! :)
Logged

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
Brendan
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6030



View Profile Email
« Reply #134 on: September 04, 2007, 02:15:13 PM »

Nice story on one of the greatest pranks in baseball history:

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=jp-bresnahanpotato083107

Quote
Tater toss
By Jeff Passan, Yahoo! Sports
August 31, 2007

Dave Bresnahan throws out the first potato before a game at Class-A Williamsport this season, the scene of his infamous potato prank 20 years earlier.

On Aug. 31, 1987, Dave Bresnahan was the Michelangelo of potato sculpting. He sacrificed five fine tubers to the spud gods – death via peel – before settling on the correct shape. He drew red lines on the winner to simulate seams, only to see them erased by the potato's weeping. He wielded that peeler like a true artiste.

Because in order to pull off the greatest prank in baseball history, Bresnahan needed to shape a potato like a baseball.

"I went to Williamsport (Pa.) this past weekend to celebrate the anniversary," Bresnahan says today from his Arizona home, 20 years after he ended his career as a catcher for the Double-A Williamsport Bills by feigning to pick off an opponent at third base by chucking a potato into left field, then using the real baseball to tag the runner when he scurried home – a hidden-ball trick to end all hidden-ball tricks.

"They gave away bobbleheads. I'm holding a potato. There's one on eBay right now. A couple sold for over a hundred bucks this week. For kicks and giggles, I looked up what Barry Bonds' was selling for, and I'm crushing him.

"I really don't understand."

There really isn't much to understand. Baseball is a stately game, sometimes too serious for its own good. There are no end-zone dances, no tongue-wagging after dunks, no cha-cha lines following goals. Should Tommy Lasorda falling on his ample keister really constitute the apotheosis of baseball humor?

No, sir. To allow an idea so unique, so brilliant and so hilarious to fade into history's annals, then, would be disrespectful not only to the game but to the man who hatched the plan and executed it to perfection.

The tater plot started in the bullpen, sanctuary for baseball's bored. Relief pitchers pass the time by scoping out women or making up silly games involving sunflower seeds. As the .149-hitting backup, Bresnahan spent plenty of time in the 'pen, and he broached the idea that had cooked in his mind for years. John Stuart Mill would have been proud of the marketplace of ideas that commenced. A roll of tape would be too light, a rosin bag too fluffy.

"And then it came to me: a potato," Bresnahan says. "Mainly because it sounds funny."

Word filtered around the Bills' clubhouse about Bresnahan's plan, and with the team more than 20 games out of first place, it gave players something to anticipate. The schedule gave Bresnahan a perfect chance. He knew he would play at least one game against the Reading Phillies in an Aug. 31 doubleheader, and the Phillie Phanatic was showing up that day too, ensuring a big crowd.

A few games before potato day, Bresnahan caught a game against the Phillies. He tried to pick a runner off third base, the first piece of bait in his elaborate hornswoggle.

"There was a lot of premeditation in this," Bresnahan says. "I'm kind of anal that way. When I plan something out, I want to make sure the details are covered. In order for this to really work, I needed a guy on third with two outs. When I did it, all the guys on the field would hustle back into the dugout. That way if the umpire ruled against us, we'd have to run back out on the field. And then it's more dramatic."

Earlier that week, Bresnahan called major-league umpire Tim Tschida, a friend of a teammate, and asked how he would rule the potato play. Tschida said he would return the runner to third base, end of story. If it was good enough for Tschida, Bresnahan figured, it worked for him.

In the fifth inning, the time came. Two outs. Runner Rick Lundblade on third. Bresnahan told home-plate umpire Scott Potter the webbing of his glove had broken. Potter allowed him into the dugout, where a glove with the peeled potato waited. Teammates giggled. Bresnahan told them to shut up.

The potato remained in Bresnahan's glove until he called the pitch, an outside slider that had little chance of being put into play. During the windup, Bresnahan transferred the potato to his bare hand.

"It wasn't that bad a throw," Bresnahan says. "It was supposed to be bad. But it was smaller. It was moist. I was nervous. I came up firing. As I threw it, I said, 'Oh, no.' It was headed right toward his helmet. It just missed."

Third baseman Rob Swain, flummoxed by the good throw, tried to sell it by doing his best olé. The potato hit the ground and exploded into three pieces. Lundblade never saw it. He had started running home.

"I tagged him and showed him the ball, then rolled it to the mound and ran toward the dugout," Bresnahan says. "All my teammates buried their faces in their gloves and were laughing. They couldn't move. I told them to get off the field."

Behind the plate, Potter was confused. The third-base umpire ran into the outfield and retrieved the biggest chunk. "It's a (expletive) potato," he yelled to Potter.

"What are you doing?" Potter asked Bresnahan.

"It's just a joke," he replied.

Potter awarded Lundblade home and the scorekeeper charged Bresnahan with an error. Bresnahan wasn't ejected, but Williamsport manager Orlando Gomez yanked him from the game immediately and fined him $50. That night, celebrating over post-game beers, Bresnahan's teammates started a fund to pay the fine.

When Bresnahan showed up at the stadium the following day, Gomez called him in his office. Jeff Scott, farm director of Williamsport's parent team, the Cleveland Indians, was on the phone. Bresnahan knew Scott from their days in the Seattle organization. Scott laughed, told Bresnahan he was an idiot and said he needed to release him.

And thus ended Dave Bresnahan's baseball career. Though he did make one more trip that season to the ballpark. Later that day, Bresnahan returned from the grocery store with huge sacks of potatoes. He placed 50 of them on Gomez's desk.

"I'm always fearful that people think I'm a goofball," Bresnahan says. "I am a prankster. I've got a good sense of humor. But I love baseball.

"I'm a historian. I'm an old-fashioned guy. I've been a season-ticket holder for the Diamondbacks. I coach my kids. Everything I do counters what I'm known for, which is the damn potato."

Paul Harvey called because of the damn potato. So did Harry Caray and countless other baseball emissaries. Bresnahan remains revered in Japan, where, for the 10-year anniversary of the potato caper, a TV station flew him out. They asked him to wear his Bills uniform – "a 10-pound sausage," he says, "into a five-pound casing" – placed him on a throne and carried him through a smoke machine.

Every day someone reminds Bresnahan of the potato, whether at his job as a project manager for a company refurbishing an old Texas sugar plant or through a letter thanking him for bringing levity to a staid game. The potato itself is the prized possession of the Baseball Reliquary, the museum of oddities that displays it in jar filled with denatured alcohol.

In January, Bresnahan spent a week at the Diamondbacks' fantasy camp. His fellow campers weren't interested in the vagaries of minor-league life or what it was like to play for Mike Hargrove in A ball. They wanted to know about the potato.

And when he told them about it, they laughed like hell.
Logged
D'Ambrosia
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3838



View Profile Email
« Reply #135 on: September 14, 2007, 08:06:34 PM »

It's a great night to be a Yankees fan!  The Yanks pulled off one of the best come backs I have ever seen...  Down 7-2 in the 8th inning The Yankees scored 6 runs in spectaculer fashion to win the 4 hour and 43 hour slug fest winning the game 8-7.

This should be a fun weekend indeed! O0
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #136 on: September 14, 2007, 08:14:27 PM »

Fabulous, fabulous game ... the best part for me was that they scored those six runs off Okajima and Papelbon! 

I certainly hope that will be the end of the sloppy play in the field for this series, though! :o
Logged
WeAllHaveItCominKid
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108


They got a sign on him in front of Greely's?


View Profile Email
« Reply #137 on: September 14, 2007, 09:21:10 PM »

It is indeed great to be a Yankees fan right now. What a game it was tonight! WOWOWOWOWW!!!! I loved seeing the look on some of the Boston fans while we took the lead.  ;D

I can't wait 'till tommaro. Should be another great one.
Logged

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
Tehama Tony
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 107



View Profile Email
« Reply #138 on: September 26, 2007, 11:30:37 AM »

Celebration of Todd Helton's game winning homerun from last week (also witnessed by me)   :o

Playoffs begin next week.
 
I think my love for baseball has certainly returned this year.  My Colorado Rockies finally have a legitimate chance to make it to the playoffs for only the second time ever.  They have now won 9 straight games, all games within their own division, which is also known as the toughest single division in baseball.  ;)  And with the San Diego Padres on the down slide, we’re practically a shoe-in for the wildcard.   :)  (only have to worry about the Phillies I think)
 
Anyway, the Rockies apparently have the least amount of errors of any team this season.  They have a potential rookie of the year in shortstop #2 Troy Tulowitzki.  (by the way, I heard somewhere that Troy’s hero is Yankees #2 Derek Jeter)  Plus, the Rockies have a possible MVP in #5 Matt Holiday.  And then, of course, there is our local hero, #17 Todd Helton, who has stuck with us since he was first drafted back in 1995.

Watch me gloat here a bit if you don’t mind…  :D    In June, we swept the Yankees, and in July we swept the Mets.  Are you Yankee fans worried yet???   ^-^  Wouldn’t that just be the sweetest, to see the Yankees vs. Rockies in the World Series!  ;D Ok, now I’m getting a little ahead of myself.   ::)  We are only 1 game back in the National League wildcard race, but with 9 straight wins, our guys are definitely PUMPED UP.
 
Logged

"When a man with a .45 meets a man with a rifle, the man with a pistol will be a dead man."  Ramon Rojo
WeAllHaveItCominKid
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1108


They got a sign on him in front of Greely's?


View Profile Email
« Reply #139 on: September 26, 2007, 03:46:02 PM »

YANKEES ALL THE WAY THIS YEAR!!! It's been a long time coming! O0
Logged

"It's a hell of a thing, killing a man. Take away all he's got and all he's ever gonna have."
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 [7] 8 9 ... 12 Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T