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Author Topic: Alfred Hitchcock  (Read 11218 times)
higashimori
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« Reply #40 on: October 13, 2013, 05:19:25 PM »


 " Rebecca "  1940   With  Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine and Judith Anderson.....

 For me, Rebecca is most dramatic film among the works of Hitchcock.  :)

 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_%281940_film%29
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Rawhide7
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« Reply #41 on: January 14, 2016, 01:51:27 AM »

Any of you own the 1948 movie rope. Directed by Hitchcock and starring jimmy Stewart. Have you seen this before?  I am trying to buy some classic movies. I really enjoyed rear window and this movie Rope looks pretty good. What are your thoughts about it?  I have been into watching and buying older classic movies. I enjoy movies that have Hollywood legends like Judy garland, Kim Novak, Grace Kelly, Micky Rooney, Henry Fonda, James Stewart, etc. Thise are some of my favorite classic actresses and actors.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2016, 01:54:52 AM by Rawhide7 » Logged
Matt
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« Reply #42 on: January 14, 2016, 02:33:29 AM »

Rope is good -- but spend your money on Eastwood films so you can do our Eastwood Movie Challenge!

But if you really want Hitchcock, my 10 favorites are Rebecca, Marnie, Notorious, North by Northwest, Spellbound, Rear Window, Psycho, The Birds, Strangers on a Train, and Vertigo. Argh, I need room for at least one more:  The Wrong ManRope doesn't make my cut.
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Rawhide7
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« Reply #43 on: January 14, 2016, 02:44:33 AM »

Thanks Matt. Yeah I'm fixing to purchase more Eastwood movies I don't own. And I'm getting 12 Angry men as well. I already own rear window and I really enjoyed that one. I rented vertigo last night and watched it for the very first time and for some reason I really didn't take to that one. I think it's because I was tired and had a bad sinus headache. Because I'm in the minority on that movie. I mean I didn't think it was just terrible. I thought it was okay. But I actually enjoyed watching rear window better. I plan on watching vertigo again and when I'm well rested and feel better. Because I read online that back in 2012 it was voted the greatest movie ever made. I do defenately want to revisit that movie. Thanks for that list. Rope looked good based on the trailer. But it didn't even make your list.
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KC
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« Reply #44 on: January 14, 2016, 02:59:52 AM »

Rope has an interesting gimmick ... if you can buy or rent it cheap or borrow it from the library, you might watch it and see if you can figure it out. (If the trailer didn't give it away.)

By the way, Matt's list left off Shadow of a Doubt ... sometimes said by Hitchcock to be his own favorite. Say, isn't there a Hitchcock thread around here somewhere? ???

Say again, why are we all three online at five o'clock in the morning? ??? ???
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Matt
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« Reply #45 on: January 14, 2016, 03:02:21 AM »

It's only 4:00 here, but I'm not even beginning to feel tired. Out of sleeping pills. :(

Yeah, Rope is definitely worth watching, but not one I'd purchase.

I can't remember Shadow of a Doubt. I need to watch that one again soon.
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KC
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« Reply #46 on: January 14, 2016, 03:13:06 AM »

Well, I'm going (back) to bed (had a long nap earlier). Good night, all night owls.
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Doug
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« Reply #47 on: January 14, 2016, 04:46:24 AM »

I like Rope a lot and have seen it many times, but I'm not so sure about recommending it as a blind purchase, because I'm not sure how many times you will want to watch it. I'd recommend something else by Hitchcock, like Shadow of a Doubt, which is my third favorite Hitch film, or North by Northwest, which is my second favorite Hitch film, and one of the most rewatchable films ever.

Somewhere on this board is a Hitchcock thread.
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« Reply #48 on: January 14, 2016, 08:04:00 AM »

Somewhere on this board is a Hitchcock thread.

I found it ... merger accomplished. :)
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Rawhide7
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« Reply #49 on: January 14, 2016, 06:57:26 PM »

Thanks everybody,

Yeah I am defenately a night owl.  It was actually 4am here where I live as well.  This site is addictive!
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Christopher
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« Reply #50 on: March 10, 2017, 06:31:15 PM »

I just watched Rope again. I'd seen it years ago, and then just saw where Rawhide had asked if people had seen it earlier in this thread. I think it's a terrific movie.
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Christopher
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« Reply #51 on: July 11, 2017, 07:11:34 AM »

Turner Classic Movies is doing Hitchcock movies two nights a week for the month of July (Wednesdays and Fridays), so last Friday night I watched Number Seventeen and the 1934 version of The Man who Knew too Much. There was nothing special about the first one, but I was very pleased with the original Man who Knew too Much. I didn't realize the 1956 film had been changed so much, besides the basic plot line and the assassination attempt sequence. I still like the 1956 film better (and it's one I've been wanting to watch again), but I definitely enjoyed the original film.
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Gant
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« Reply #52 on: July 26, 2017, 02:17:35 PM »

My Mum saw Psycho at the cinema when it was released and never got over it.. !!!
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« Reply #53 on: September 14, 2018, 12:26:50 PM »

I was curious if we had a Hitchcock thread. I just found this and since I think I'm going to be watching more Hitchcock films, I'd like to revive this thread.

I am going to repost my reaction to the first Hitchcock movie which I saw here to re-start this discussion:

I watched "Dial M for Murder" this weekend. It was randomly on TV and I decided to check it out. I don't think I'd ever seen an Alfred Hitchcock movie before. I liked it!
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AKA23
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« Reply #54 on: September 14, 2018, 12:41:23 PM »

I finished "Vertigo" last night. I think I set myself up for disappointment, since I had read during my research on Hitchcock films that Sight and Sound magazine had listed it as the number one movie of all time. I have to confess, I don't really understand why. I preferred "Dial M For Murder."

"Vertigo" was definitely worth watching and I'm glad I saw it, but why is it listed as one of the best movies of all time? Does anyone know?

I actually watched it over two days since I had difficulty getting through it initially. All those scenes with "Madeline" acting potentially possessed and the retired detective running around town acting like a lovesick puppy because of a girl he barely knew got a bit old to me after awhile. 

To me, it got much more interesting SPOILERS FOLLOW FOR VERTIGO...........after Madeline, from the detectives perspective, threw herself off the building. I definitely really enjoyed the twist. I did not see it coming that an imposter, Judy, had been acting as Madeline and that her husband used the retired detectives illness as cover to murder her. I wasn't a big fan of the ending though, when Judy randomly fell off the building when the nun came in to ring the bell, and found those scenes where Jimmy tried to remake Judy into Madeline to be extremely disturbing and uncomfortable to watch. 

I can definitely see the appeal of Hitchcock though. He's pretty masterful at creating the environment and setting the scenes that are needed in order to create the story that he seeks to tell. 

What does everyone else think of "Vertigo?"
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Matt
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« Reply #55 on: September 14, 2018, 01:46:01 PM »

All those scenes with "Madeline" acting potentially possessed and the retired detective running around town acting like a lovesick puppy because of a girl he barely knew got a bit old to me after awhile. 



 ;D I mean, it's JAMES STEWART.  If he wasn't running around after a girl he barely knew like a lovesick puppy, who would?

To me, black and white movies, and classics like Vertigo are just special experiences -- it's a time capsule. Few of these movies still feel new, but many are still very exciting and thrilling. I love the way it feels ... like history. It's exciting to think of how they did the photography back in the days before CGI. Like, this shot from Hitchcock's Saboteur:



AKA, I'm jealous that you have all these great films to discover for the first time. Think of them as cinema history lessons if you must. Watch Citizen Kane, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (though James Stewart will run around a bit more -- not quite like a lovesick puppy, but still, classic James Stewart), and definitely Cassablanca and maybe Rebecca, one of my favorite Hitchcock films.

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Matt
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« Reply #56 on: September 14, 2018, 01:51:53 PM »

Actually, I've been thinking of getting the Movie Club going again. Maybe we should do some favorite classic films, and get a schedule together. Stay tuned after baseball has ended next month.
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KC
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« Reply #57 on: September 14, 2018, 10:28:52 PM »

AKA, those scenes in Vertigo "where Jimmy tried to remake Judy into Madeline" ARE "extremely disturbing and uncomfortable to watch." I'm not sure they were meant to be so, but it's hard to see them any other way. I think that is part of the reason why some critics rate the film so highly. I don't agree, though ... I admit that it hypnotically beautiful to look at, but I much prefer several other Hitchcock films, for instance North by Northwest, Rear Window and (among black and white films) Shadow of a Doubt, which Hitchcock himself ranked among his personal favorites.

You'll find little that's "uncomfortable to watch" in at least the first two of those.  :)
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AKA23
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« Reply #58 on: September 15, 2018, 06:39:41 AM »


AKA, I'm jealous that you have all these great films to discover for the first time. Think of them as cinema history lessons if you must. Watch Citizen Kane, Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (though James Stewart will run around a bit more -- not quite like a lovesick puppy, but still, classic James Stewart), and definitely Cassablanca and maybe Rebecca, one of my favorite Hitchcock films.

I've actually seen "Mr Smith Goes To Washington." Thanks for the other recommendations!
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AKA23
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« Reply #59 on: September 15, 2018, 06:45:34 AM »

AKA, those scenes in Vertigo "where Jimmy tried to remake Judy into Madeline" ARE "extremely disturbing and uncomfortable to watch." I'm not sure they were meant to be so, but it's hard to see them any other way. I think that is part of the reason why some critics rate the film so highly. I don't agree, though ... I admit that it hypnotically beautiful to look at, but I much prefer several other Hitchcock films, for instance North by Northwest, Rear Window and (among black and white films) Shadow of a Doubt, which Hitchcock himself ranked among his personal favorites.

You'll find little that's "uncomfortable to watch" in at least the first two of those.  :)

KC, it's heartening to hear that I am not crazy and that you also prefer other Hitchcock films. Was anyone else underwhelmed by "Vertigo?" or have a historical perspective to offer for why it's seen as one of the best films ever? Upon its release, it was apparently not critically or commercially successful, so there does appear to have been a re-evaluation of it decades later and I'd be interested to learn why people think that occurred. 

I think I will watch "Rear Window." That does sound interesting, and I recently read a book, "Woman in the Window" (which will soon me made into a movie starring Amy Adams) that was clearly based in part off of that story.
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