News: Having trouble registering?  Please feel free to contact us at help[at]clinteastwood.org.  We will help you get an account set up.


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Alfred Hitchcock  (Read 11722 times)
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14190



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #60 on: September 15, 2018, 08:38:33 AM »

AKA, so you haven't seen Psycho yet?  Put yourself down for Rear Window on the movie club schedule, and think about recommending Psycho. It's a movie everyone should see at least once.
Logged
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2751



View Profile Email
« Reply #61 on: September 15, 2018, 03:44:09 PM »

I havenít seen ďPsycho.Ē On Imdb, they state itís partly a horror movie. Is that true? That doesnt seem to fit the plot description to me. I really hate horror movies though, so if its in that genre, I donít think Iíd like it. Iím definitely up for watching Rear Window.
Logged
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Online Online

Posts: 6300


The real me


View Profile Email
« Reply #62 on: September 15, 2018, 04:37:48 PM »

I mentioned in the first post of this thread that Vertigo is my favorite Hitchcock movie, and that's still true. I LOVE the punch in the gut ending.

I remember the first time I watched the movie was shortly before Jimmy Stewart died, which would place that in 1997. I liked the movie then, but it wasn't until I was in college and watched the movie three times to write a paper about it that it became my favorite (and that would have been around 2003). Yes, Stewart's character falls in love awfully fast, but watching him become unhinged just isn't something you'd typically expect from one of his characters. Of course Stewart wasn't afraid to get a bit dark with some of his roles, and he pulled it off wonderfully in Vertigo. It's my favorite performance from Stewart.
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14190



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #63 on: September 15, 2018, 06:44:50 PM »

I havenít seen ďPsycho.Ē On Imdb, they state itís partly a horror movie. Is that true? That doesnt seem to fit the plot description to me. I really hate horror movies though, so if its in that genre, I donít think Iíd like it. Iím definitely up for watching Rear Window.

Yeah, it technically can be considered horror, so can The Birds. But, they're not like horror films today. They are psychological dramas with horror aspects that I think helped spawn the horror films that we know today. I'm not sure, but it's possible Psycho could be considered the first slasher film. But don't let that scare you away (pun intended). It's too good a drama for one horror-type scene to keep you from watching one of the best acting performances in history, and some damn fine directing.
Logged
Gant
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6043


His job ..... steal it.


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #64 on: September 15, 2018, 11:33:44 PM »

Back in the mid eighties some of Hitchcock's most famous films were re-released in the cinema in London and that's where I got to see them for the first time... Rear Window totally blew me away and I still think of it as my favourite of his..

To this day when I'm travelling and or staying somewhere new I'll check the view from the window to see if there's a " rear window" type view... Often there is and it never fails to set my imagination racing...

My top 5

Rear Window
Rebecca
Psycho
Strangers on a Train
North by Northwest
 
« Last Edit: September 15, 2018, 11:36:28 PM by Gant » Logged

Borderline burnout with questionable social skills
Doug
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2836


"May I make a suggestion..."


View Profile Email
« Reply #65 on: September 16, 2018, 01:23:07 PM »

What does everyone else think of "Vertigo?"

I've always been a bit underwhelmed by Vertigo as well, and I've seen it a bunch of times, including many times as a kid. But the last time I watched it might be the closest I've come to appreciating it the way others seem to do. I think the trick is see it strictly through a psychological perspective. The plot is so outlandish, but if you focus on Scottie's obsession, you can get more out of it.

Like KC, my three favorite Hitchcock films are Rear Window, North by Northwest, and Shadow of a Doubt, but I like or love just about all of his films.

Here's an interesting video I saw a couple years ago focusing on one scene in Vertigo.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw</a>
Logged

"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14190



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #66 on: September 17, 2018, 09:53:02 AM »


Here's an interesting video I saw a couple years ago focusing on one scene in Vertigo.


That was cool -- a mini film class. It's interesting how the blocking plays into the subconscious when you watch it, because non-film students wouldn't think about all that, and yet we still get the feelings that Hitchcock wanted to get across with the blocking.

Doug, how about joining us for some of the Hitchcock movies in our Movie Club? Shadow of a Doubt still hasn't been nominated. You don't have to participate in all of them, maybe just the ones that you haven't seen in a while.
Logged
Gant
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6043


His job ..... steal it.


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #67 on: September 17, 2018, 12:57:14 PM »

Wow... That was brilliant, thanks for posting..

I do think Vertigo is a grower. I was a little disappointed the first time I saw it but have enjoyed it more and
More with subsequent viewings...
« Last Edit: September 24, 2018, 01:00:16 AM by Gant » Logged

Borderline burnout with questionable social skills
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2751



View Profile Email
« Reply #68 on: September 23, 2018, 05:26:02 AM »

How's Marnie? I like Sean Connery and was intrigued that he was in a Hitchcock film.
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14190



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #69 on: September 23, 2018, 08:38:25 AM »

Marnie is another of my favorites!  I would love to watch this again. Maybe 2 more bonus films?  ;)
Logged
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2751



View Profile Email
« Reply #70 on: September 23, 2018, 10:05:51 AM »

It sounds like you're a pretty big Hitchcock fan, Matt. As directors go, is he your second favorite after Eastwood?

I'd be down for adding "Marnie" to the schedule if others are also interested in seeing it.
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14190



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #71 on: September 23, 2018, 05:01:12 PM »

It sounds like you're a pretty big Hitchcock fan, Matt. As directors go, is he your second favorite after Eastwood?

Yeah, he probably is. His movies are just so great, but his casting is also divine. These are the screen gods and goddesses in some of their best roles. They're classic films that are intelligent, mysterious, romantic, and so well acted. Sean Connery, James Stewart, Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier, Henry Fonda, and Gregory Peck are some of the best golden screen actors, and then they're paired with royalty (literally) Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, Kim Novak, Eva Marie Saint, the list goes on and on. When I said earier that I like classic films because it's like a time capsule and a bit of history, this is exactly what I meant, and probably half the reason I love these films.

Quote
I'd be down for adding "Marnie" to the schedule if others are also interested in seeing it.

Okay, we now have it on there as a second bonus. That brings us right to the week before Christmas.
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24571


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #72 on: September 23, 2018, 05:32:48 PM »

Sean Connery, James Stewart, Cary Grant, Laurence Olivier, Henry Fonda, and Gregory Peck are some of the best golden screen actors, and then they're paired with royalty (literally) Grace Kelly, Ingrid Bergman, Kim Novak, Eva Marie Saint, the list goes on and on.

Did Hitchcock ever write an autobiography?

Or has anyone read a good biography on him?

That list of actors make me wonder did they rush at the chance to be in a Hitchcock film or Hitchcock chose them?
Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 31526


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #73 on: September 23, 2018, 06:28:58 PM »

Hitchcock never wrote an autobiography, and you won't like him very much (as a person, not as a director) if you read any of the more thorough biographies out there, such as Donald Spoto's The Dark Side of Genius (1983; reprinted to mark the Hitch centenary in 1999).
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 31526


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #74 on: September 23, 2018, 06:55:46 PM »

Here's an interesting video I saw a couple years ago focusing on one scene in Vertigo.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw</a>

Excellent. Thanks for posting that, Doug.

For those who wondered, the name behind "Nerdwriter" is Evan Puschak.
Logged
The Schofield Kid
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 24571


All on account of pulling a trigger.


View Profile Email
« Reply #75 on: September 23, 2018, 08:47:20 PM »

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/UgnNakO6JZw</a>


That was great.


If you have a spare 64 minutes, watch the Dick Cavett show from 1972 with Hitchcock. Very interesting.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/OvNla9-u6xM" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/OvNla9-u6xM</a>

Logged

"Winners are simply willing to do what losers won't."
Gant
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6043


His job ..... steal it.


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #76 on: September 24, 2018, 01:01:55 AM »

I recently played at a converted cinema in East London, Walthamstow where Hitch went as a kid to see movies.. Amazing building, I've got photo's but unfortunately they're on my phone so I can't upload..
Logged

Borderline burnout with questionable social skills
Doug
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2836


"May I make a suggestion..."


View Profile Email
« Reply #77 on: September 24, 2018, 11:04:53 PM »

How's Marnie? I like Sean Connery and was intrigued that he was in a Hitchcock film.

Funny, I've never thought very highly of Marnie. Of his 60s movies, it's my second least favorite ahead of Torn Curtain. Yes, I think I like Topaz more.
Logged

"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
Doug
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2836


"May I make a suggestion..."


View Profile Email
« Reply #78 on: September 28, 2018, 04:10:22 AM »

I watched The 39 Steps tonight, which I had not seen before, despite what I wrote earlier. I also watched the 30s version of The Man Who Knew Too Much, also a first-time viewing of the movie. I have these movies from a collection of early Hitchcock movies I have, and the quality could certainly be better, and maybe that played a factor in my lack of appreciation for The Man Who Knew Too Much, or maybe I'm just too familiar with the 50s remake, but I was underwhelmed. I really liked The 39 Steps, though. The Lady Vanishes is included in this collection, but when I first watched it, it was a good quality DVD. I remember that, because it was the very first DVD I ever watched on my then new computer which had a DVD player before I had a stand alone player, and the picture quality was quite exceptional. I'm hesitant to even bother with this version of the movie.
Logged

"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Online Online

Posts: 6300


The real me


View Profile Email
« Reply #79 on: September 28, 2018, 06:26:58 AM »

That's probably close to the same cheap set I have of Hitchcock's early films, Doug. I can't remember if it was earlier this year or last year that I watched the 1930s version of The Man Who Knew Too Much for the first time, but I liked it.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 3 [4] Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T