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Author Topic: Eastwood to be interviewed at The New Yorker Festival Oct 3-5, 2008  (Read 6014 times)
Dan Dassow
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« on: August 21, 2008, 03:32:34 AM »

New York Times
Arts, Briefly
The New Yorker Festival Announces Its Lineup
Compiled by JULIE BLOOM
Published: August 20, 2008

Quote
A town hall meeting on race and class in America will be among the highlights of the ninth annual New Yorker Festival from Oct. 3 to 5, the magazine announced. Its editor, David Remnick, will moderate the discussion, which will include the scholar Cornel West, the linguist John H. McWhorter and the journalist Barbara Ehrenreich, among others. Other sessions include a panel on political humor with Andy Borowitz, Samantha Bee of “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart” and Allison Silverman, executive producer of “The Colbert Report”; a discussion with Oliver Stone about his coming movie “W.,” based on the life of George W. Bush; and interviews with Stephen Colbert, Elizabeth Edwards, Clint Eastwood, the soprano Dawn Upshaw, the novelist Haruki Murakami and others. Tickets go on sale Sept. 12 at festival.newyorker.com.

Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/21/arts/21arts-THENEWYORKER_BRF.html?ref=arts

Note: This is a seperate event from the New York Film Festival, although they occur on the same dates.

The schedule for the New York Film Festival has been announced. Changeling will screen Saturday, October 4 (9:15 PM), and Sunday, October 5 (11:15 AM); both screenings at the cavernous Ziegfeld Theatre.

http://www.filmlinc.com/nyff/program.html

We Film Society members should be getting our order form soon; it's being mailed out on August 22nd. Tickets go on sale to the rest of the public on Sunday, Sept. 7, at 12:00 noon at Avery Fisher Hall, and Monday, Sept. 8, online at filmlinc.com
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Dan Dassow
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2008, 04:48:48 AM »

New Yorker festival sets guest list
Eastwood, Colbert, Stone among notables

By SAM THIELMAN
Variety

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Clint Eastwood, Oliver Stone, Tommy Lee Jones and Stephen Colbert are among the notables set to take part in the New Yorker Festival, running Oct. 3-5.

Event hosted in various venues by the venerable magazine is a mix of 50 events, most of them panels and interviews seshes.

Link: http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117990913.html?categoryId=13&cs=1
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Dan Dassow
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2008, 10:16:39 AM »

The New Yorker Festival
October 3-5, 2008
New York City
Full Schedule: http://festival.newyorker.com/schedule.cfm

Excerpt:
Quote
Schedule At A Glance
Tickets for The New Yorker Festival will go on sale at 12 noon E.T. on Friday, September 12th. For more information, click here.
*Indicates events sold through Ticketmaster. Please note that tickets to ALL events will be sold at Festival HQ during Festival weekend.
Click here for more information.

SATURDAY | October 4
Writers and Their Subjects

Clint Eastwood and Lillian Ross
1 p.m. Directors Guild of America ($25)


http://movies.ign.com/articles/391/391439p1.html
Clint Eastwood on Mystic River
A few words from a man of few words.
by Steve Head
Quote
March 28, 2003 - I haven't heard much about Clint Eastwood's upcoming film, Mystic River. So my interest was piqued when the current issue of The New Yorker was brought to my attention. In the March 24 [2003] issue, veteran journalist Lillian Ross conducts a lengthy interview with Clint Eastwood. And it takes place on both coasts: in Carmel, California at his ranch where he's working on his Jazz documentary entitled Piano Blues and in South Boston, Massachusetts on the set of Mystic River.

« Last Edit: September 08, 2008, 10:37:38 AM by Dan Dassow » Logged
KC
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2008, 04:43:43 PM »

Thanks for reminding me about this event, Dan. I've sent myself an e-mail at work so I can try to get a ticket as soon as they go on sale. On my lunch hour, of course!
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Dan Dassow
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2008, 04:31:52 AM »

Thanks for reminding me about this event, Dan. I've sent myself an e-mail at work so I can try to get a ticket as soon as they go on sale. On my lunch hour, of course!

It looks like Saturday October 4, 2008 will be a busy day for Mr. Eastwood. KC, may you enjoy the interview and the premiere of Changeling.
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2008, 02:08:05 PM »

I hope you get tickets, KC  8)
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2008, 01:01:01 PM »

Times like this where I seriously miss New York.
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Dan Dassow
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« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2008, 06:21:46 AM »

I hope you get tickets, KC  8)
  O0

I just received an email reminder from New Yorker Festival that tickets go on sale today at noon.

http://downloads.condenasthost.com/EmailBlasts/NewYorker/091208_TixNow/TixNow_091208b.html
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The annual New Yorker Festival features cultural programs all over New York City from October 3rd through October 5th.

TICKETS ON SALE TODAY AT NOON E.T.

Tickets are available online at festival.newyorker.com or by calling 800-440-6974.


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« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2008, 08:17:47 AM »

 >:( Thanks for the info Dan! Much appreciated!

Sadly,I tried at 12 pm noon 9/12 & apparently you CAN'T get tix for the Eastwood talk either online or in the mail.You MAY get a ticket the day of the event in person!
That's absolutely lousy for those of us who live a distance away & aren't close & have to make travel plans.
Cattman
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Dan Dassow
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« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2008, 08:28:31 AM »

>:( Thanks for the info Dan! Much appreciated!

Sadly,I tried at 12 pm noon 9/12 & apparently you CAN'T get tix for the Eastwood talk either online or in the mail.You MAY get a ticket the day of the event in person!
That's absolutely lousy for those of us who live a distance away & aren't close & have to make travel plans.
Cattman
This is discouraging. I am still hoping that at least a few of the knowledgable and respectful fans from this forum would be able to attend.  :(
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« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2008, 05:11:02 PM »

>:( Thanks for the info Dan! Much appreciated!

Sadly,I tried at 12 pm noon 9/12 & apparently you CAN'T get tix for the Eastwood talk either online or in the mail.You MAY get a ticket the day of the event in person!
That's absolutely lousy for those of us who live a distance away & aren't close & have to make travel plans.
Cattman
That's odd. I was able to order on line with no problems. Perhaps they sold out really, really fast. (I went to the site a couple of minutes before noon and kept refreshing until a link to buy tickets appeared.)

Anyway, I am going, with a friend who's not a member of this forum but who is a knowledgeable moviegoer and likes Clint and his films.

Sorry it didn't work out for you, cattman!
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KC
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« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2008, 07:03:48 PM »

For those who still want to try to get a ticket to this event ... the Festival website says:

Quote
At Festival HQ:Ten per cent of tickets to all events will be available during Festival weekend at Metropolitan Pavilion, at 125 West 18th Street (between Sixth and Seventh Avenues). Tickets will be sold on Friday, October 3rd, from 12 noon to 4 p.m., and on Saturday, October 4th, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. First come, first served

At the door: A limited number of tickets will be sold at the door to each event one hour before start time, with the exception of A Governors Island Bike Tour, Morning at the Frick, Come Hungry, Inside the Artist’s Studio, and Spice World.
First come, first served. Cash only.

http://www.festival.newyorker.com/ticket_info.cfm

So, it's not just the day of the event, but also the day before, from noon to 4 PM.
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Dan Dassow
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« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2008, 05:49:52 PM »

For those who still want to try to get a ticket to this event ... the Festival website says:

http://www.festival.newyorker.com/ticket_info.cfm

So, it's not just the day of the event, but also the day before, from noon to 4 PM.

http://downloads.condenasthost.com/EmailBlasts/NewYorker/091908_FestivalMobile/TNY_FestivalMobile.html
Quote
Stay connected during The New Yorker Festival.

Make sure you’re in the know with exclusive New Yorker Festival text alerts. Throughout the Festival, receive updates on author signings, special events, ticket availability, and much more.

To receive New Yorker Festival text alerts, text NYFEST to 644444 from your mobile device or visit festival.newyorker.com

Sponsored by Blackberry

I checked it out and it works. You will continue to receive updates until you text STOP to 644444.
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« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2008, 03:49:18 PM »

 " At New Yorker Festival, celebrities explain why they do what they do "

   
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NEW YORK - Clint Eastwood appeared Saturday at the New Yorker Festival, a weekend-long orgy of celebrity and intellectualism thrown by the magazine of the same name. In introducing the actor-director, writer Lillian Ross told the audience about the animals that greeted her during a visit to Eastwood's home. She remembered encounters with a pig, some bottle-fed rats, and a chicken from the neighbor's house.

"A chicken does indeed cross the road. But why?" Ross said. "To see Clint Eastwood."

  http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081008/ART16/810080347

  http://www.newkerala.com/fs/f/a-6410.htm
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« Reply #14 on: October 08, 2008, 06:53:44 PM »

There is a brief blog entry (by Lizzie Widdicombe) about this event on the New Yorker site. It includes a video clip of Clint at the piano.

Quote
Clint the Composer

On Saturday, at the Directors Guild of America, Clint Eastwood, who has written the score for many of his own films, told Lillian Ross more about his composing process: with “Unforgiven,” he thought of the music before shooting began, but sometimes he works it out later.

    “Mystic River” was a difficult one, because I couldn’t find a theme to that, so I finally looked at—I started thinking about the three main actors—the three boys, played by Tim Robbins, Sean Penn, and Kevin Bacon. They all formed this triangle, so I started writing a triad, playing with that on a piano. And all of a sudden I developed this theme based on this triad, which is nothing terribly complicated, but to me—in a movie, the music shouldn’t be terribly complicated. It should be supporting, not overriding.

In Ross’s 2003 Profile of Eastwood, he described the theme song to “Mystic River”:

    “There’s no jazz in it. And there’s no blues. It’s more on the classical side, to be played by a full orchestra, eventually—by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, as it turns out. If I had to describe it, I’d say it’s something bittersweet. It’s like life, where you’re constantly adjusting to everything. It’s all improvisation.”

At the DGA, Eastwood walked over to the piano, and talked about how—and why—a “slow” boy like himself discovered various musical styles, from ragtime to Chopin.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/festival/2008/10/clint-eastwood-composer.html

I was rather surprised to hear him cite Chopin as an influence on his composing!
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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2008, 08:49:16 PM »

I promised a report on this event, and I'm finally getting around to it.

As the Toledo Blade story Higashimori posted mentioned, the afternoon opened with an introduction by the venerable New Yorker writer Lillian Ross, who had profiled Eastwood for the magazine in 2003. She was joined on the stage by New Yorker editor Susan Morrison.

To start with, there was a brief montage of seminal Eastwood moments (on both sides of the camera) from A Fistful of Dollars to ... Gran Torino. (I don't know if this was the first time a clip from this was shown in public, but it may well have been.) I was disappointed that there was a jump from Dirty Harry (the bank robbery scene) and Play Misty for Me (Evelyn gets hysterical) to Unforgiven (the "lone pine" scene, edited rather severely), and some of the turns the conversation would take suggested that perhaps Ms. Ross wasn't overly familiar with the likes of The Outlaw Josey Wales, Bronco Billy, Tightrope, and White Hunter, Black Heart. For one thing, she asked whether Eastwood would consider The Bridges of Madison County to be a "turning point" in his filmmaking career, after which he deliberately sought out more challenging subject matter and bigger themes. Eastwood denied this, saying that his choices to make particular films were based on whether "an interesting character comes along." At this point, I started to make a few notes, but I had forgotten to bring a notebook, so I used my ticket envelope. So they are very brief!

Eastwood called Changeling an "adult horror story" and said that it was a great ensemble piece.

Asked about his beginnings in Rawhide, he said he was grateful for the steady work and he decided to exploit his situation to familiarize himself with the filmmaking process—"I'll just stay here and learn." From the good directors among the parade of those who helmed the hundreds of episodes, he learned a lot about what to do as a director, and from the bad ones ... he learned what NOT to do.

He welcomed the break from this routine offered by the chance to shoot A Fistful of Dollars in Europe. "It gave me a chance to play an attitude of someone with disdain for everyone." He wasn't aware that he was creating an iconic character; he just thought it would be interesting and different, and if the movie turned out badly, no one would ever see it.

In connection with the "accidental" success of the Leone pictures, he said "Life is full of accidents, and a movie is a series of accidents with little corrections."

He mentioned the scene from Misty that had been shown in the opening montage, and said he liked the role reversal: It's his character who says "Evelyn, we've got to talk," when usually that's the woman's line in a relationship.

The conversation turned to music, and the music he composes for his films. (See the blog entry posted above, in which there's a brief clip of Clint at the piano.) "Music [in films] should be supportive, and not overriding." As I noted above, I was startled to hear Clint say that "probably more of my themes are related to my love of Chopin than anyone else."

Speaking of music, at one point Ms. Morrison confessed to warm feelings for one of Eastwood's least-admired films, Paint Your Wagon. Eastwood talked a bit about the six-month production history ... mostly familiar stuff. such as how someone on the production told him to tell Lee Marvin he didn't have any beer if Marvin came to his trailer and asked for one. "I said, why not? I have beer." It seemed Marvin would then have to have a whiskey chaser, and things would go downhill from there ... Clint mentioned that he had just finished filming Where Eagles Dare with Richard Burton, who was similarly given to overindulging in alcohol, so he was used to that sort of thing. Eastwood and Marvin did their own singing, and the director, Joshua Logan, had the bright idea that they should be recorded on location, not dubbed later in the studio. So in "I Talk to the Trees," he really did go out and talk, or rather sing, to the trees.

Ms. Morrison mentioned that she had heard a rumor that British singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock is working on a rock opera based on Magnum Force. That was news to Clint!

On directing actors: "I don't talk a lot, I'd rather see what the actor brings first." Eastwood feels that directors who started their careers as actors have an advantage in this aspect of filmmaking.

Ms. Ross had high praise for The Bridges of Madison County, calling it perhaps the greatest love story ever captured on film. She asked Eastwood how he had gotten the great shots of Meryl Streep, when she sees Robert for the last time in the pouring rain (this was shown in the opening montage); Eastwood replied basically that it was all Meryl's doing. He mentioned that it was the screenwriter, Richard LaGravenese, who had taken the bestselling book about a wandering photographer who meets a lonely Iowa housewife, and turn it around and tell it from the woman's point of view, which made it work much better.

Why had he chosen to make two of his most recent pictures (Million Dollar Baby and Changeling) with women in the central roles? As he has frequently in past interviews, Eastwood mentioned growing up with "women's pictures" ("Chick flicks, only they didn't call them that") starring the great Hollywood actresses of the day, like Barbara Stanwyck and Bette Davis.

Why Changeling? "You like the story, that's all."

On music again: "I don't like to manipulate the audience." Ms. Ross agreed, and mentioned her disdain of films in which the score overwhelms the story, as seems to happen so frequently in contemporary films.

On contemporary politicians: James Cagney was talking about acting when he said "Plant your feet and tell the truth," but it's good advice for politicians, also. But we are now in an era of "promising everyone something."

Asked to name his favorite films, these are some of the titles he mentioned: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Out of the Past, Blood on the Moon, High Sierra, Grapes of Wrath, Sunset Boulevard, Double Indemnity, and films by Hawks, notably Red River. As for current films, he didn't get to see many ... he's been too busy.

There was a question-and-answer segment with audience members. I didn't make notes on this, but I remember a couple ... Someone asked (tongue in cheek, I THINK), whether Eastwood was disappointed that John McCain hadn't picked him to be his running mate. He laughed and recalled a function he was at a few months ago, at which he ran into McCain and told him, "Don't even think about asking me!"

A young woman, who said it was her "dream" to be there that afternoon, wondered how much Clint remembered about all of the films he's made; that is, about making them. Eastwood and Ross (who is in her eighties) bantered a bit about whether this was an "ageist" question, and Eastwood allowed as how some he remembered better than others, and some parts of some better than other parts.

Then there were the silly ones, like the woman who stood up and told a yarn about how she had only ever kissed three celebrities ... in her dreams: Eastwood, John F. Kennedy Jr. and one other lucky fellow (I forget who). She said Eastwood was the "best kisser," and wondered if any of his leading ladies had ever told him he was a "good kisser."  Eastwood declined to answer that one.

The session lasted about an hour and a half, and Eastwood was very relaxed and answered most questions at length. When it was over, he walked slowly off the stage, pausing graciously to sign autographs for as many fans as had managed to make their way to the front row.
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