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Author Topic: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly: Audience Reaction 5: Oscar Worthy?  (Read 5795 times)
The Schofield Kid
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« on: January 08, 2010, 08:54:11 PM »

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly was not nominated for an Oscar in any category. Just for fun, if you were told you could go back in time and nominate The Good, the Bad and the Ugly for one (and only one) Academy Award, in which category would you nominate it: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Cinematography, Best Original Screenplay, Best Score, or some other category?

Tell us the reasons for your choice.
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D'Ambrosia
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2010, 11:52:23 PM »

Just for fun I'm going to post up the contenders and winners for the 41st Academy Awards:

I should mention that the Oscar nominations and winners below are from 1968.

While The Good the Bad and the Ugly was released in Italy in 1966 it wasnít eligible for an Academy Award(s) until 1968
because it wasn't released in the United States until January 1968.



ACTOR
 Alan Arkin -- The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter {"Singer"}  
 Alan Bates -- The Fixer {"Yakov Bok"}  
 Ron Moody -- Oliver! {"Fagin"}  
 Peter O'Toole -- The Lion in Winter {"King Henry II"}  
* Cliff Robertson -- Charly {"Charly Gordon"}  

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
* Jack Albertson -- The Subject Was Roses {"John Cleary"}  
 Seymour Cassel -- Faces {"Chet"}  
 Daniel Massey -- Star! {"Noel Coward"}  
 Jack Wild -- Oliver! {"The Artful Dodger"}  
 Gene Wilder -- The Producers {"Leo Bloom"}  

ACTRESS
* Katharine Hepburn -- The Lion in Winter {"Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine"}
[NOTE: A tie. The other winner in this category was Barbra Streisand (Funny Girl).]
 Patricia Neal -- The Subject Was Roses {"Nettie Cleary"}  
 Vanessa Redgrave -- Isadora {"Isadora Duncan"}  
* Barbra Streisand -- Funny Girl {"Fanny Brice"}
[NOTE: A tie. The other winner in this category was Katharine Hepburn (The Lion in Winter).]
 Joanne Woodward -- Rachel, Rachel {"Rachel Cameron"}  

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
 Lynn Carlin -- Faces {"Maria Forst"}  
* Ruth Gordon -- Rosemary's Baby {"Minnie Castevet"}  
 Sondra Locke -- The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter {"Mick Kelly"}  
 Kay Medford -- Funny Girl {"Rose Brice"}  
 Estelle Parsons -- Rachel, Rachel {"Calla Mackie"}  

ART DIRECTION
* Oliver! -- Art Direction: John Box, Terence Marsh; Set Decoration: Vernon Dixon, Ken Muggleston  
 The Shoes of the Fisherman -- Art Direction: George W. Davis, Edward Carfagno  
 Star! -- Art Direction: Boris Leven; Set Decoration: Walter M. Scott, Howard Bristol  
 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Art Direction: Tony Masters, Harry Lange, Ernie Archer  
 War and Peace -- Art Direction: Mikhail Bogdanov, Gennady Myasnikov; Set Decoration: G. Koshelev, V. Uvarov  

CINEMATOGRAPHY
 Funny Girl -- Harry Stradling  
 Ice Station Zebra -- Daniel L. Fapp  
 Oliver! -- Oswald Morris  
* Romeo and Juliet -- Pasqualino De Santis  
 Star! -- Ernest Laszlo  

COSTUME DESIGN
 The Lion in Winter -- Margaret Furse  
 Oliver! -- Phyllis Dalton  
 Planet of the Apes -- Morton Haack  
* Romeo and Juliet -- Danilo Donati  
 Star! -- Donald Brooks  

DIRECTING
 The Battle of Algiers -- Gillo Pontecorvo  
 The Lion in Winter -- Anthony Harvey  
* Oliver! -- Carol Reed  
 Romeo and Juliet -- Franco Zeffirelli  
 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Stanley Kubrick  

FILM EDITING
* Bullitt -- Frank P. Keller  
 Funny Girl -- Robert Swink, Maury Winetrobe, William Sands  
 The Odd Couple -- Frank Bracht  
 Oliver! -- Ralph Kemplen  
 Wild in the Streets -- Fred Feitshans, Eve Newman  

MUSIC (Original Score--for a motion picture [not a musical])
 The Fox -- Lalo Schifrin  
* The Lion in Winter -- John Barry  
 Planet of the Apes -- Jerry Goldsmith  
 The Shoes of the Fisherman -- Alex North  
 The Thomas Crown Affair -- Michel Legrand  

 BEST PICTURE
 Funny Girl -- Ray Stark, Producer  
 The Lion in Winter -- Martin Poll, Producer  
* Oliver! -- John Woolf, Producer  
 Rachel, Rachel -- Paul Newman, Producer  
 Romeo and Juliet -- Anthony Havelock-Allan and John Brabourne, Producers  

SOUND
 Bullitt -- Warner Bros.-Seven Arts Studio Sound Department  
 Finian's Rainbow -- Warner Bros.-Seven Arts Studio Sound Department  
 Funny Girl -- Columbia Studio Sound Department  
* Oliver! -- Shepperton Studio Sound Department  
 Star! -- 20th Century-Fox Studio Sound Department  

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
 Ice Station Zebra -- Hal Millar, J. McMillan Johnson  
* 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Stanley Kubrick  

WRITING (Story and Screenplay--written directly for the screen)
 The Battle of Algiers -- Franco Solinas, Gillo Pontecorvo  
 Faces -- John Cassavetes  
 Hot Millions -- Ira Wallach, Peter Ustinov  
* The Producers -- Mel Brooks  
 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke  




To pick one is really difficult!  You could seriously go right down the list and plug in The Good the Bad and the Ugly in each category.

Looking back on all the traditional westerns none of them have the dusters or the wide brimmed hats.  They all look like conventional get ups.

Quote
In the old westerns that I grew up with Hoot Gibson, Jack Holt, Gene Autry and those people, they never dressed the way you saw them dress in this movie.  NEVER!
-Eli Wallach from Leoneís West on the Special Edition

Quote
When I was at his house I said where did you dream up the idea of those long coats?  You know, down to the ankles.  And he said,  Iíll show you. And he had an American book of the West and there were these pictures of the cowboys wearing dusters.  Well of course. They were always in the dust and the rain and they covered their whole body.

-Mickey Knox from Leoneís West on the Special Edition

Blondieís sheep skin coat.
Tucoís Sombrero and parasol.
The dusters.
The Union and Confederate uniforms.

And of course the Poncho!

Iíll go with Best Costume Design.  Leone studied feverishly to get the costumes right for the period.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2010, 01:08:31 AM by D'Ambrosia » Logged
The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2010, 10:31:21 PM »

It's a toss up between Best Supporting Actor for Eli Wallach or Best Original Score for Ennio Morricone.

If I only had to pick one it would be Best Original Score.

The music all throughout the film is spectacular. The opening tune which is one of the most reconizable bit of film music in the history of cinema. The music being played during the torture of Tuco is so lovely that it tries to take away the brutality of what's taking place behind closed doors.

And to finish off the film you have the brilliant "The Ecstasy Of Gold".

I think it's time I added this soundtrack to my collection.
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Doug
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2010, 02:24:14 AM »

In a just world it would have been nominated for Music, Cinematography, Costume Design, Film Editing, and Best Supporting Actor Eli Wallach.  But even in a just world, you can't expect a film to be nominated for Best Picture so long after its release overseas (especially a violent western), but in a super-just world, it would have been nominated for Best Picture and Best Director.  Alas ....

Probably the biggest crime is Ennio Morricone not getting a nomination for Music.
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2010, 04:34:49 AM »

Yes I think it was Oscar Worthy,  mainly because it had everything, actors, direction, cinematography, music and suspense.
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WildTrout
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« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2011, 02:49:35 PM »

It's a toss up between Best Supporting Actor for Eli Wallach or Best Original Score for Ennio Morricone.

I am in complete agreement.  That is a tough call.  If I had to pick just one I'd go with Eli Wallach for Best Supporting.
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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2015, 09:08:41 AM »

In a just world it would have been nominated for Music, Cinematography, Costume Design, Film Editing, and Best Supporting Actor Eli Wallach.  But even in a just world, you can't expect a film to be nominated for Best Picture so long after its release overseas (especially a violent western), but in a super-just world, it would have been nominated for Best Picture and Best Director.  Alas ....

Probably the biggest crime is Ennio Morricone not getting a nomination for Music.

Agree with Doug here, but I'd give a slight edge to Cinematography over Original Score.

I wonder why it was overlooked. I don't know much about the process, but I believe the filmmakers must apply for the awards before being nominated? If anyone knows more about this, please add it here. It's hard to believe this film wasn't recognized at all when it could have won in so many categories.
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