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Author Topic: Bumstead on Eastwood  (Read 5349 times)
Holden Pike
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« on: December 07, 2002, 01:45:58 AM »

Been meaning to post this for a while.



In the latest issue of MovieMaker magazine (Issue No. 48, VOL. 9 - Marty Scorsese on the cover) there is a two page interview with longtime Hollywood veteran Henry "Bummy" Bumstead. If you don't know the name, you should. Bumstead is an art director, and in addition to working on over ten Eastwood projects (including all the films since Unforgiven, and the upcoming Mystic River) he's also worked with Hitchcock, Scorsese, Billy Wilder, George Roy Hill and has dozens of film credits in his 63 years in the business.

The Eastwood parts of the article...

Quote
TEN AND COUNTING WITH CLINT

BUMSTEAD: I had the same relationship with George Roy Hill that I now have with Clint Eastwood. What I love about Eastwood is that he has taken all the B.S. out of making pictures. Clint has branched out and done difficult films over the course of his career. He's one of those directors who really understands that the set is a character in a film.

The first picture I did with him was Joe Kidd (1972), directed by John Sturges. We built sets in the high Sierras and in Tuscon, Arizona, where the train runs into the saloon at the end. Clint liked what I did on Joe Kidd and years later hired me to do Unforgiven. Unforgiven was a very rushed production: we scouted and picked the location for Big Whiskey in Calgary, Canada in one day. What helped me the most was designing a simple and uncomplicated period set - no Victorian gingerbread, and no big mirror behind the bar with a nude woman centerpiece.

I made the drawings in L.A., flew to the location and built the set in 36 days with a lot of good help. The only person I took with me was my painter, Doug Wilson, who has worked with me since 1960. It was another one of my favorite experiences. On Space Cowboys we built a flight deck and mid-deck of a space shuttle. I was knee-deep in computers with help from my young colleagues.

In Blood Work, Clint's character lives on-board a boat. I thought it would be marvelous to have the boat down by the Queen Mary. That way, audiences from the midwest that haven't traveled out to California would get a kick out of seeing the Queen Mary in the background. That was the main location we picked.

The big challenge on Blood Work was building the interior of an old freighter where most of the action takes place, aging it down and filling the engine room with water for the climax. I really enjoyed that fact that we shot the whole movie around town so I could go home every night and sleep in my own bed. I'm 87, you know. It's nice to have everything local.

Even at this old age, my interest and love for a project is what keeps me going. Otherwise, I wouldn't do another film.

« Last Edit: December 07, 2002, 01:55:45 AM by Holden Pike » Logged

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KC
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« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2002, 02:02:18 AM »

Thanks, Holden! That's wonderful stuff.

I think I read somewhere recently that Bumstead said he wouldn't still be working, if it weren't for Clint (maybe in one of the articles about Mystic River.

KC
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AKA23
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« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2002, 03:05:43 PM »

Thanks for posting that Holden! Bumstead has said that on several different occasions I believe KC but here's one of those recent articles about Mystic River . I think it might be the one you are talking about:

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''I wouldn't be working for anyone else, at my age,'' he says. ''Clint takes the BS out of making movies.'' Bumstead, or ''Bummy'' as everyone calls him, arrived in Boston in mid-August to scout locations for ''Mystic River.''

http://www.thebostonglobe.com/dailyglobe2/311/living/Where_the_action_is-.shtml

On a different note, I've noticed that once again Tom Stern is cinematographer on Mystic River as he was on Blood Work . My question is does anyone have any idea what happened to Jack Green? He appears to still be working, but the last two films that Clint's done, he hasn't been involved despite being his in house cinematographer..so, what happened here? Did Clint and him have a falling out....did Green want to move onto other things and no longer wanted to work for Clint, or what?





« Last Edit: December 07, 2002, 03:14:13 PM by AKA23 » Logged
AKA23
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« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2002, 03:09:48 PM »

So, nobody has an idea, then?
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Christopher
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« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2002, 07:20:16 PM »

Has Stern worked with Eastwood at other times in the past?
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KC
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« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2002, 07:42:36 PM »

Tom Stern's association with Eastwood goes back to 1982's Honkytonk Man , on which he served as gaffer. After that he was gaffer, lighting consultant or chief lighting technician on the following Eastwood films: Sudden Impact, Tightrope, Pale Rider, Heartbreak Ridge, Bird, The Rookie, Unforgiven, A Perfect World and Space Cowboys. Blood Work was his first job as D.P., and it's very like Eastwood to promote someone whose works he likes after a long apprenticeship; more or less the same thing happened to Jack N. Green, who had been camera operator on many Eastwood films going back to the 70s before being promoted to D.P. for Heartbreak Ridge in 1986.

Green worked for other directors all through the nineties, and according to the IMDb, he has no fewer than four projects in the works for next year ... so it may simply be a case of his being too busy to participate on Malpaso projects any more.

Green is also a director ... I saw his Eastwood-influenced debut feature, Traveller in 1997, but I missed last year's Pretty When You Cry (which was apparently only on television). Did anyone see it?

KC
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