News: Now showing in theaters: CRY MACHO, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


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Author Topic: Tag You're It #5!!!  (Read 57604 times)
The Schofield Kid
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« on: November 22, 2015, 06:24:56 PM »

I think it's time we had another game of "Tag You're It"!!

It's been 7 years since our last Tag game and if you're not familiar with the concept here's a link to #4 to get you up to speed.

Here's how the game works:

I'll start by naming two members and asking them Eastwood-related questions.  If they choose to answer the question, they will then be able to "tag" two more members and come up with questions for them to answer. You may not join in the game unless you are tagged.  But, if there's a very interesting question that is asked of someone else that you'd like to answer, by all means start a topic on the board in the appropriate forum.  This game is ALL ABOUT getting Eastwood conversation rolling, learning from each other's differing opinions, getting to know each other better, and getting our less talkative members to start talking it up.

If it's your turn to ask two members questions, you may want to PM (Private Message) the members so that they'll know they were tagged. 

I'll start the game rolling by asking two members who post regularly a question. Once we get things rolling, it'll be great to pose questions to the members who rarely post or who have just returned ( :) ), to see if we can get them posting more often.


AmericanBeauty:  With your love of photography, is there any place from an Eastwood movie you'd love to visit and photograph?

Rawhide 7: If you had to choose one of your Eastwood DVD's over all the others, which one would it be?
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Rawhide7
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« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2015, 09:12:21 PM »

Without question I would choose my Unforgiven DVD. My brother gave me the two disc special edition several years ago for Christmas.  Unforgiven is not only my favorite Eastwood western and favorite western movie but it's my second favorite overall movie period. Plus I enjoyed watching all of the special features and stuff. Really great movie and awesome two disc special edition DVD.

KC: If you could ask Clint only one question what would you ask him?

Jed Cooper:  Your a huge fan of Elvis Presley. Which one of Clint's movies would you have liked to see both Clint and Elvis costar in?  This can include any movie that Clint acted in after Elvis passed away.
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Americanbeauty
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« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2015, 02:17:55 PM »

A place from an Eastwood movie that I'd like to visit and photograph... It's a tie between New Orleans and Washington DC :)


Matt: After going on an "Eastwood hiatus" for years, you decide to ease back into his films by binge watching several of them. Let's say 4 in a row. Which ones do you pick?


Christopher: can you guess the Eastwood movie from that one and only screen capture?

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Matt
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« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2015, 02:26:53 PM »

A place from an Eastwood movie that I'd like to visit and photograph... It's a tie between New Orleans and Washington DC :)

Great choices! How about Africa?


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Matt: After going on an "Eastwood hiatus" for years, you decide to ease back into his films by binge watching several of them. Let's say 4 in a row. Which ones do you pick?


Well, I'm going to have to do that exactly. After the holidays, I'll probably get back into them. I don't know them well enough to really discuss them anymore -- definitely need a refresher course. It was more fun last time though, when I was new to the forum because KC was helping me stay enthusiastic with her whip and training sessions. Now... I've got AKA and Brendan. ;)

I would actually start with all the newer ones that I haven't seen yet, but I think you'd rather know which 4 of his that I've already seen....

I'd do four westerns just to get me really excited again... Definitely For A Few Dollars More, The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, The Outlaw Josey Wales and Unforgiven.

Schofield Kid:   What did you think of Hereafter. I don't want a film review -- I want you to dig deep and give me your thoughts on the subject matter.

Conan: 
You've got another date with another girl who, sorry soul, has never seen a Clint Eastwood movie. She is quite possibly... the one. You want to reel her in and show her a great time. What's your double feature, and to make it a little fun and off-topic -- what kind of food are you serving?


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Jed Cooper
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2015, 06:10:41 AM »

Great idea for a thread revival, SK!  "Thankyouverymuch" for including me, Rawhide7! 

To answer your question, Charro! came to mind first but that's more of an individual project.  Interesting to note that Eastwood was first considered, but turned it down.  Too bad, because it would've been a better film. 

No offense to Clint's singing, but I honestly don't see him in any of Elvis' musicals.  Or, I'd have to give that some more thought before answering.  But, to save time I would say Flaming Star.  Clint would play Elvis' older brother.  That would seem to be the best fit.  Elvis' acting was good in that film and, as it turns out, was directed by Don Siegel. 

Ok, I think I'll pick on the mods first.  I have the same question for both KC and Schofield Kid:  If you had the opportunity to appear in an Eastwood movie with Clint, which one would it be, why and what part would you play?   

...Is it okay to ask the same question of two members/mods?  ???
« Last Edit: November 24, 2015, 06:11:45 AM by Jed [Brian] Cooper » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2015, 07:53:32 AM »

Quote from: Matt
Conan:  You've got another date with another girl who, sorry soul, has never seen a Clint Eastwood movie. She is quite possibly... the one. You want to reel her in and show her a great time. What's your double feature, and to make it a little fun and off-topic -- what kind of food are you serving?

Aw yeah, she's stepping into the Cone Zone.  The smooth dulcet tones of Barry White is kicking as I open the door in my monogrammed velour robe and...Ok to be serious, I've got a lady these days and she has seen American Sniper and Trouble with the Curve and thought both were ok.  I've held off on showing her the classics, though that will happen soon.  So if I was "breaking in" a new date on Eastwood, and lets assume she has no specific preference on movie genre, I would choose The Beguiled and Unforgiven.  The former has some romance while showcasing early Clint, and is interesting in an original way that most thrillers aren't.  Unforgiven is so amazing that it just must be shown.  It is also not so "western" that you have to be a fan of westerns to appreciate, and the rollercoaster of emotions would make for great after-movie conversation.  After that, I would of course be serving my patented Seafood Mix with a side of Conan Lovin' aw yeah baby.  *shakes head furiously* Sorry, I was getting caught up again...So in addition to the Seafood mix main course, I'd serve a small cobb salad and a bowl of diced exotic fruits for desert.


Whistledixie:  Sometimes you see a flick and just know that the screenwriter was either a bit messed up or at least going through a rough patch when they wrote the movie.  Which of Eastwood's movies (any of them, he doesn't have to be the screenwriter) most appears to have been written by a tormented writer suffering from "acerbic bitterness"?

Richard Earl:  Steven Spielberg has ordered you to recast the leads for a Paint Your Wagon remake.  You have been given an unlimited budget, and the plot and overall tone are the same as the original.  Who do you cast in the lead roles?
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Richard Earl
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2015, 06:57:39 PM »

Thank you Conan! That is a good question but I would not feel right about answering this question since I cannot make it through watching the film. I just do not like it. If there is anyone here on the board that has a good answer to Conan's question please be my guest. O0
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Matt
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2015, 09:47:12 AM »


Richard Earl:  Steven Spielberg has ordered you to recast the leads for a Paint Your Wagon remake.  You have been given an unlimited budget, and the plot and overall tone are the same as the original.  Who do you cast in the lead roles?

The only way this would work. A modern retelling Black Lives Matter style, Paint Your Crib starring Beyonce and Flo Rida.

(They did it with The Wiz, you know.)

Just wanting to keep the thread movin' and the newly returned back in the game.



DOUG:  You can go back in time and tweak any Clint Eastwood movie dialogue or plot. You can do it just one line that would make all the difference in the world, or rewrite the entire script. Which film do you pick, and why? If it's not too much work, what are the reasons and revisions you'd like made?

AKA23:  What Eastwood character (performed by Clint) do you have a hard time reconciling the most for his moral actions, and what in particular makes them the hardest to accept?
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Matt
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« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2015, 09:53:57 AM »

Aw yeah, she's stepping into the Cone Zone.  The smooth dulcet tones of Barry White is kicking as I open the door in my monogrammed velour robe and...Ok to be serious, I've got a lady these days and she has seen American Sniper and Trouble with the Curve and thought both were ok.  I've held off on showing her the classics, though that will happen soon.

 ;D  The Cone Zone.  Hey, congrats and best of luck with the lady. It's about time you found a good one. Guess this means you finally dumped the Eagle.
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Matt
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« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2015, 10:01:08 AM »

...Is it okay to ask the same question of two members/mods?  ???

Sure, it's been done before.  :)

Some of our members are a little busy with things, and the holidays coming up on us, but if the thread stalls, we'll just jump in and keep it rollin'. I'm sure once Christmas is behind us, everyone will have more time.

Good to see you still here, Richard.  O0
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Whistledixie
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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2015, 01:46:18 PM »

Whistledixie:  Sometimes you see a flick and just know that the screenwriter was either a bit messed up or at least going through a rough patch when they wrote the movie.  Which of Eastwood's movies (any of them, he doesn't have to be the screenwriter) most appears to have been written by a tormented writer suffering from "acerbic bitterness"?

Hmm...tough call, unless it's based on the characters themselves displaying acerbic bitterness. Whether you take that as the screenwriter's outlook would be another issue. Walt from Gran Torino shows it...though not sure he fits the qualifier of it being "born of rejection," since he usually did the rejecting...and not sure about the screenwriter's outlook. Probably the Dirty Harrys, particularly the first one, written in part, and Magnum Force, written in full by John Milius, the guy John Goodman's character in The Big Lebowski is based on, assuming he's actually like that character (and why not for the sake of argument?)

Would have to do more research to cue on the screenwriter's outlook, though. An interesting question, and definitely something that jumps out at you sometimes.

In general I'd think of Raymond Chandler and the noir screenwriters. They had the best bad attitudes in that regard...though like any voice, it can get old, too.
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« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2015, 04:04:22 PM »

Whistledixie , I wonder if John Lee Hancock who wrote the storyline to A Perfect World had some things going on in his head. I tried to do some research after reading the question that was addressed to you thinking about that film.  I love A Perfect World. Kevin Costner's character had some issues but I loved how he cared for the boy like a son and how it ended.   I hope it is okay to comment on someone else's question. It was a good one and made me think.
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Whistledixie
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« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2015, 04:30:16 PM »

^ Good candidate! Although I don't know anything about him, just given the content and characters he created I'd say he belongs in the shopping cart to check out later...plus if it works with screenwriters like it does with lone gunmen (and I have to believe it does) that use of all three names, particularly with one of them being "Lee," can't be a good sign... :idiot2: ;D

It is a good question. Gets you thinking...
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Matt
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« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2015, 05:20:46 PM »

I thought of Tightrope.

Whistledixie, don't forget to tag 2 people.
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Americanbeauty
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« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2015, 05:42:17 PM »

Probably the Dirty Harrys, particularly the first one, written in part, and Magnum Force, written in full by John Milius, the guy John Goodman's character in The Big Lebowski is based on, assuming he's actually like that character (and why not for the sake of argument?)

In general I'd think of Raymond Chandler and the noir screenwriters. They had the best bad attitudes in that regard...though like any voice, it can get old, too.

Chandler-izing Dirty Harry ::)
Oh yeah, it could have totally worked.

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« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2015, 06:17:22 AM »

Whistledixie, don't forget to tag 2 people.

Getting up to speed now...just noticed I had a tag notice in my messages from the 24th! Will send two notices after posting this.

Okay, I'll tag Matt and Jed...if you had to defend Clint Eastwood movies/his persona/message on an intellectual level to, say, a film critic like Pauline Kael (who famously called Harry a fascist), or just explain why you think he has lasting appeal and/or varies from the general public image, what would you say? (Trying not to ask a leading question revealing my thoughts.)

American Beauty, a Chandler-izing of Harry would be awesome! Probably have to show more of his personal grumblings about things...although Philip Marlowe was generally more introspective than Harry, which was kind of the point of Harry I guess. Acerbic humor works nicely with the character, though... :)
« Last Edit: November 28, 2015, 06:40:05 AM by Whistledixie » Logged
The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2015, 06:26:58 AM »

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Schofield Kid:   What did you think of Hereafter. I don't want a film review -- I want you to dig deep and give me your thoughts on the subject matter.

I remember seeing this film when it was released and came away disappointed. It wasn't bad but I hoping for better. Maybe it had something to do with me being very sceptical when it comes to psychics,clairvoyants and such.

I just don't buy that anyone can speak to the dead and I believe a lot of psychics prey on the vunerable who have suffered great loss in their lives and in the hope of communicating with their lost loved ones. I've seen plenty of psychics on TV and they ask audience members questions about their lives and I just think, "Stop asking them questions and just come out and say things but no, if you do that, most of the time you'll get nowhere and you'll look like a failure."

It's like astrology and all that mumbo jumbo. You can read in the paper that you'll meet a stranger today and he'll give you money. Or expect a change in your relationship status if you're single, love is in the air for you this month.

I mean, please are you kidding me? I get money from strangers everyday. It's called change from a cashier when I buy something!

I find near death experiences of people seeing white lights or departed loved ones calling them into the light more believable than talking to the dead around a table in a darkened room. 

Quote
Schofield Kid:  If you had the opportunity to appear in an Eastwood movie with Clint, which one would it be, why and what part would you play?

Easy. The Schofield Kid in Unforgiven. Me an unknown in a part about a cocky younger man trying to show off with all his big talk about killing people but when the time comes to pull the trigger for real, his true self appears.

Gant:

What's the most jaw dropping moment from an Eastwood film that you remember?

Elizabeth77:

Who's your favourite actress from an Eastwood movie?
« Last Edit: November 28, 2015, 06:32:36 AM by The Schofield Kid » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2015, 06:50:48 AM »

American Beauty, a Chandler-izing of Harry would be awesome! Probably have to show more of his personal grumblings about things...although Philip Marlowe was generally more introspective than Harry, which was kind of the point of Harry I guess. Acerbic humor works nicely with the character, though... :)
Poor choice of emoji on my part, I meant ^-^ and not  ::) (posted the reply with my phone which apparently has a mind of its own)

Of course it would be awesome, I absolutely LOVE Raymond Chandler.
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« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2015, 07:17:23 AM »


Okay, I'll tag Matt and Jed...if you had to defend Clint Eastwood movies/his persona/message on an intellectual level to, say, a film critic like Pauline Kael (who famously called Harry a fascist), or just explain why you think he has lasting appeal and/or varies from the general public image, what would you say? (Trying not to ask a leading question revealing my thoughts.)


"On an intellectual level" ...  you had to go and make it difficult for me. *summoning powers of KC. Asking Matt Damon to channel just a little bit of KC's brilliance so that I can write something that makes sense outside of this padded cell.

Doing my best....

So, growing up BC (Before Clint), our heroes were perfect, and we couldn't really connect with them, or aspire to be like them. Well, we could try, but we'd always fail. We could never be like The Duck, or Gary Cooper. We weren't bad, though. We just didn't always do the right thing. Sometimes, we wanted to f@#k with the world a little (High Plains Drifter), sometimes we wanted to just be left alone (Unforgiven). Sometimes we wanted to just have fun with friends (EWWBL), and fall in love (Bridges). Instead, we were human. Flaws and all. We all are. We understand that. We root for him, because he's like us. But he's better than us. Someone we can still look up to and aspire to be like. You don't have to be perfect to be The Good.

He always, always has a heart. He's never cold and calculating.

A fascist? Why not just call all of us fascists then who aren't Christ-like? Maybe Pauline Kael just doesn't like the human race, or was angry that someone had the balls to show that there are heroes inside failed people, and that strength doesn't come from winning, but from fighting and never giving up.

Matt Damon, you let me down. KC would have done much, much better.

I don't know, Whistledixie. I do love Clint's movies, and I Have admired him since I was a kid and who wouldn't want to be like him? But one of the reasons I love his movies is because they're heart-pounding, exciting, entertainment, and Clint is so damn cool.  8)

Tagging:  Higgy (I don't want to lose this post on my sucky iPad by trying to switch windows to look up her name).  When did you become a Clint fan? Was there a particular movie that led you to wanting to seek out more of his movies and made you more than a casual fan? (I don't see that ANYONE who joins this board is a casual fan, you have to literally find it, sign up for it, and read and comment here -- not something people do for an actor they sorta liked in one movie).

BDC28:  Dirty Harry or Josey Wales? Was one more of an outlaw of their time?
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Matt
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« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2015, 07:38:44 AM »

I just don't buy that anyone can speak to the dead and I believe a lot of psychics prey on the vunerable who have suffered great loss in their lives and in the hope of communicating with their lost loved ones. I've seen plenty of psychics on TV and they ask audience members questions about their lives and I just think, "Stop asking them questions and just come out and say things but no, if you do that, most of the time you'll get nowhere and you'll look like a failure."

See, the movie shows that exactly. So, you agreed with the subject matter then? (missing smilie with question marks above his head)

Quote
I find near death experiences of people seeing white lights or departed loved ones calling them into the light more believable than talking to the dead around a table in a darkened room. 

I have more questions. Guess what? You're getting tagged again next time I'm up. :)

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