News: Having trouble registering?  Please feel free to contact us at help[at]clinteastwood.org.  We will help you get an account set up.


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Eastwood Movie Challenge, Week Seven: Dirty Harry, Joe Kidd  (Read 12237 times)
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2016, 11:33:24 PM »

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dP9Cc_wdNeM" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dP9Cc_wdNeM</a>

Love this song.
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2016, 11:41:48 PM »

I thought Don Siegel's cameo in Dirty Harry was at the beginning? He's wearing sunglasses and a hat as Harry walks down the street to the building, Scorpio fired from the rooftop.

I can't find him.  :(
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2016, 12:03:46 AM »

Joe Kidd is one weird western. True, it's one of his weakest films, but like Christopher I find that I enjoyed it more than Two Mules for Sister Sara.  The licensing must have been cheap for this movie because I think it was the most replayed Eastwood film on TV when I was growing up. People my age knew Clint as "Joe Kidd". None of them were die-hard fans, just friends of mine.

I like the train scene mainly because of the bartender/saloon owner, who is still pouring drinks after the train crashes through his saloon, but doesn't say a word until Joe grabs a gun to try to shoot down Harlan's men, when he finally yells 'Jesus, Joe!"   ;D

Some strange casting in this one with John Saxon as Louis Chamas. The year after Joe Kidd he'd have his career role in Enter the Dragon.



Playing the protagonist in back-to-back years in movies with the two biggest stars of the 1970's (and maybe my two favorite actors of all time) is not a bad couple of years.

Stella Garcia as Helen Sanchez is one of the weakest leading ladies of all Eastwood. That is some pretty bad acting.

Not even a whole lot of good Eastwood one-liners, and not many laughs... just a few funny moments between Lamar and Joe.

Robert Duvall was very good. He'd only get better with age. It's funny when you see Robert Duvall and start to think that he looks young. I guess that's when you know you're getting up there.

Yeah, not a great film, but it was enjoyable enough to watch again, and glad the run-time was kept short on this one.
Logged
Hemlock
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2652



View Profile Email
« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2016, 12:37:41 AM »

Dirty Harry is pure greatness.Everything in that film is perfect.
After seeing so many film-psychos,I still think Andrew Robinson's Scorpio is the best and thrillers/horror films etc are as good as the villains in them...which does not mean that the hero is no as important...and Harry Callahan is the ultimate police in the film world.

Joe Kidd gets better with every viewing.It's not among Eastwood's finest westerns but still solid,entertaining film.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 12:50:37 AM by Hemlock » Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2016, 12:46:02 AM »

I was looking through the cast list of Dirty Harry and noticed the name Debralee Scott as Ann Mary Deacon. The name sounded familiar, so I looked her up on IMdb and found this sad news:

Quote
Ironically, she died in Florida shortly after moving there from New York City to help an ailing sister. One day she collapsed and was in a coma for several days but awoke in the hospital and seemed to be fine for a spell. She was released two days later on her birthday. No explanation was given for the coma, but she seemed fine and in good spirits. Three days later she went to take a nap and never woke up. Cause of death uncertain despite an autopsy. She was cremated.

She was only 52.

And before that:

Quote
She was engaged to John Levi, who was a police officer with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, who was killed in the September 11 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center.

I guess this would explain it:

Quote
The mother of her fiancé said Scott developed a drinking disorder shortly after the the 9/11 atrocities. She says, "Debralee has cirrhosis of the liver from her drinking." The actress' sister Jerri Scott adds, "She never did get over Dennis' death.".

 :'(

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0779047/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #25 on: March 14, 2016, 07:02:45 AM »

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dP9Cc_wdNeM" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dP9Cc_wdNeM</a>

Love this song.

And do you remember how long it took us to figure out what it was (composer, singer and even the lyrics?)

http://www.clinteastwood.org/forums/?topic=2530.0

http://www.clinteastwood.org/forums/?topic=2553.0
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 07:07:47 AM by KC » Logged
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6863



View Profile Email
« Reply #26 on: March 14, 2016, 11:21:30 AM »

Joe Kidd is one weird western. True, it's one of his weakest films, but like Christopher I find that I enjoyed it more than Two Mules for Sister Sara
SK was the one who mentioned that. I'd still put Two Mules over Joe Kidd. Two Mules has that exciting battle sequence at the end, and Joe Kidd has no such exciting scenes in it. My main criticism of Two Mules is that it feels a bit too long.

I never knew that was Andy Robinson's stepson at the end of the movie!
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #27 on: March 14, 2016, 11:26:07 AM »

SK was the one who mentioned that. I'd still put Two Mules over Joe Kidd. Two Mules has that exciting battle sequence at the end, and Joe Kidd has no such exciting scenes in it. My main criticism of Two Mules is that it feels a bit too long.


My bad!  But, Joe Kidd has those great jail scenes, and the train!
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #28 on: March 14, 2016, 11:59:10 AM »

And do you remember how long it took us to figure out what it was (composer, singer and even the lyrics?)

http://www.clinteastwood.org/forums/?topic=2530.0

http://www.clinteastwood.org/forums/?topic=2553.0

I do! It took me all of five seconds to find it now. Back then, the internet was still so young it wasn't "out there" yet. Now, all I had to do was google "just take your mask away halloween season", and up popped the YouTube video, and links to our threads. If we could have time traveled to 2016 back in 2002  it would have saved us a tremendous amount of research.
Logged
Jed Cooper
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5233



View Profile Email
« Reply #29 on: March 14, 2016, 12:10:17 PM »

I've always rated Joe Kidd at the bottom of Eastwood's westerns but after seeing it today, I have to place it above Two Mules For Sister Sara now. Joe Kidd isn't a great movie but I'm not bored with it and at 80 odd minutes, it doesn't drag on.

I like Lalo Schifrin score, Eastwood plays it cool again. I like how he puts people in there place. The guy in jail with him pushes the coffee cup away then cops the stew in the face and then the saucepan. He pulls Don Stroud down the staircase by his pants and the big finale of driving a train through the saloon then starts shooting. Reminds me of Dirty Harry doing a similar thing with a car into the liquor store.

Overall an entertaining movie.

I agree with rating Joe Kidd above Two Mules For Sister Sara.  There was a time I’d rated these two, along with Pale Rider, as Eastwood’s worst westerns.  Except for Two Mules, I now see them in a more favorable light. 
Logged

“Eyuh.”
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #30 on: March 14, 2016, 01:40:08 PM »

One reason I enjoy Joe Kidd more than Two Mules for Sister Sara ...



 


Joe is cooler than Hogan. Clint isn't trying here... he's naturally cool, whereas I wrote about Hogan that Clint almost seems to be trying to be as cool as his Spaghetti Westerns... instead of just being his natural cool self, like Harry and Kidd.

Plus, Clint is a sidekick to MacLaine in Two Mules. It seems more her movie than his.
Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #31 on: March 14, 2016, 02:48:55 PM »

Here's another reason Joe Kidd > Two Mules



Robert Duvall insisting on calling Luis Chama (SH sound and rhymes with Llama)  Louis Chama (rhymes with hard CH sound and rhymes with GAME-uh -- I can't think of a better rhyme).  And the accent on Lew-EES vs. the way he says LEWis.

It's one of his ways of disrespecting Chama, but in such an understated way. It's a great little characterization that Duvall adds to the Harlan character.
Logged
Christopher
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6863



View Profile Email
« Reply #32 on: March 14, 2016, 04:40:22 PM »

Robert Duvall is wonderful in Joe Kidd. O0
Logged
Doug
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2940


"May I make a suggestion..."


View Profile Email
« Reply #33 on: March 15, 2016, 05:07:07 AM »

I'm still trying to figure out what movie you guys watched by the title of Two Mules for Sister Sara, because these criticisms of it make no sense to me. Two Mules ... fun. Joe Kidd ... I don't even want to go there. I seriously never want to watch it again. It's probably five or six times I've seen it all the way through and a dozen more incomplete viewings, and that is more than enough for one lifetime.
Logged

"Yes, well, when I see five weirdos dressed in togas stabbing a guy in the middle of a park in full view of a hundred people, I shoot the bastards, that's my policy."  Frank Drebin, Police Squad.
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #34 on: March 15, 2016, 09:41:33 AM »

Joe Kidd is fun. You just gotta get into the right frame of mind. Put on your fake gringo mustache and sombrero... talk like LUIZ SHHHHAAAMA.  And get drunk, undo your tie, eat sandwiches with thumb and one finger, extending all others and practice saying completely carelessly "I have nothing against Luis Chama." Polish up your cookware in the event you need a weapon if someone wants a Please before giving you coffee. Maybe you can learn great tips like how to swing pottery from 2nd floor buildings without hitting it against the building, or how to throat punch someone with a rifle butt, and find loose floorboards to pull away from unsuspecting pacers.

Yes, there's a tremendous amount of fun to be had with Joe Kidd. I put it up against Two Mules any day. :)
Logged
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3598



View Profile Email
« Reply #35 on: March 19, 2016, 10:28:44 AM »

"Dirty Harry" is another really great Eastwood movie. Eastwood is absolutely perfect for the role, and "Dirty Harry" is definitely the best movie of this series. It has the most compelling story, and the most iconic villain. Andy Robinson's portrayal of Scorpio is terrifying. He did such a great job. Don Siegel's selection of him was definitely the right choice. He looks so innocent and naive, but underneath that deceptive exterior is a monster.

 I think it also most successfully develops its themes. Embedded within "Dirty Harry" is a great social commentary on the tension between getting justice for victims and protecting the society from the harms criminals cause, and preserving and defending the rights of those criminals. It questions whether society at that time had struck the right balance or had bent over too far towards criminals and too far away from victims, justice, and the preservation of safety. The fearlessness with which it questions these things is why it was so controversial at the time. Things like a police officer needing a search warrant before being able to gather evidence, the right for the accused to receive the counsel of an attorney, and the need for a police officer to inform an accused criminal of their rights are so foundational to our society today that they are no longer questioned. They are seen as essential. They are seen as necessary checks on police power, but back then, a lot of people saw them as impediments to the preservation of a safe society. Surely all of us recognize that in many cases they still are.

In a case like Scorpio's, his guilt is clear, the danger he represents is there for everyone to see, and yet the system still doesn't seem to work well enough, or fast enough, or at all, for his victims. And that's where Dirty Harry arrives to right those wrongs. He doesn't care about all that bureaucratic red tape. He isn't "broken up" about psychopaths rights. He's concerned with obtaining justice, but doing what is just is not always legal, and doing what is legal is not always just. Not all the time. Or, is it? Those are the questions that the movie so effectively poses.

The character of "Dirty Harry" has also been so influential in so many ways. John McClane in the "Die Hard" series, Martin Riggs in the "Lethal Weapon" series, Paul Kersey in the "Death Wish," series, Jack Bauer in "24," none of them would even exist without Dirty Harry. The man on a mission who will stop at nothing to get his man, and who isn't too bothered about breaking some laws or cutting through some bureaucracy in pursuit of his own brand of a higher justice, these characteristics are most identified first with the Dirty Harry character. They all stand on the shoulders of Eastwood and his unforgettable performance as Inspector Dirty Harry Callahan.

This theme of man against the system, or of the criminal justice system being flawed, not working as intended, or not being able to hold wrongdoers accountable for their crimes, were themes Eastwood would later develop in his own career as a director, most notably in "The Gauntlet," "A Perfect World," "Absolute Power," and "True Crime." Ben Shockley was needed to protect a witness and bring down a corrupt police chief who had raped her. Red Garnett tried to protect Butch Haynes from being killed after the criminal justice system only made his pathologies worse. Luther Whitney was needed to bring down the President of the United States when the most powerful man in the world used his power and influence to avoid punishment for his crimes. Steve Everett had to save an innocent man from execution for a crime he didn't commit. Before all these characters in all these movies, there was Dirty Harry who was doing the very same thing in his own time.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 10:31:13 AM by AKA23 » Logged
Matt
Global Moderator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14885



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #36 on: March 19, 2016, 11:04:17 AM »

Just when I thought there wasn't anything left to say about Dirty Harry. :)

I would like to respond to it, but I don't have anything to add. You said it all perfectly. The only thing I can even think to say is in response to this:

Don Siegel's selection of him was definitely the right choice. He looks so innocent and naive, but underneath that deceptive exterior is a monster.


The IMDb trivia page (link provided in one of my posts above) has the following to say about the casting of Robinson:

Quote
Andrew Robinson was cast at the behest of Clint Eastwood who had seen him in a Broadway production of Fyodor Dostoevsky's "The Idiot". Eastwood then convinced director Don Siegel that Robinson had the right unnerving characteristics to make an effective Scorpio.

Quote
One of the reasons why Don Siegel cast Andrew Robinson as Scorpio was because he wanted someone "with a face like a choirboy".

AKA, next week is a catch up week. Maybe you'll slam dunk a few more and keep posting. :)
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #37 on: March 19, 2016, 05:00:01 PM »

AKA, I 'm beginning to think you missed your calling ... you should have been a movie critic!
Logged
Elizabeth77
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1298



View Profile Email
« Reply #38 on: March 19, 2016, 06:43:27 PM »

I must have been very tired when I watched Dirty Harry, because it didn't seem to strike any kind of chord with me this time, positive or negative.  I do like the film, but somehow didn't get into it.  It's been said already, but it's the contrast between the sweetness of Scorpio's face and the darkness of his character that makes him so terrifying.  I really admire the lady who drove the school bus.  She was fantastic.  Her performance was the one that really stood out for me this time.

I have voluntarily watched Joe Kidd more than once and enjoyed it, but have to admit that it's not very memorable.  The train ride and its aftermath is probably my favorite scene.  I had completely forgotten that Robert Duvall was in this, so that was a pleasant surprise.  I think it will probably be a long time before I watch this film again.  There are so many other westerns that I like better.
Logged

"Thought I was having trouble with my adding.  It's all right now."
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3598



View Profile Email
« Reply #39 on: March 22, 2016, 08:15:29 AM »

AKA, I 'm beginning to think you missed your calling ... you should have been a movie critic!

It's easy to write a review when the movie is as good as "Dirty Harry."  :D
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T