News: Coming in 2021: CRY MACHO, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


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Author Topic: KC, our beloved Board Administrator, our Everything, has passed away  (Read 1735 times)
Christopher
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« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2021, 09:36:29 AM »

Thanks for posting those, Matt. I don't think I'd ever seen a photo of her, but the one article did show her with the scarf the library gave her.
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« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2021, 10:11:57 AM »

I just read this, I am shaking.  KC was here since this board started years ago in old formats. Life hasnt been easy here with covid reaching thousand deaths for day. Hearing this made me question so many things . I felt like I knew her. She was always very kind to me during all those years. She will be forever in my heart. Rest in peace, Kathie.
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2021, 04:31:02 PM »

I woke up last Tuesday excited to be heading out for a weeks vacation. Laying in bed and I hear my wife say, "Oh no!", I can tell by the tone of her voice that its serious and she reads Laura's email. We are both stunned.

I joined the board in 2004 and my first post was answered by Kathie. I think I drove her a little crazy the first few months I was on the board asking questions. A lot I was asking was already discussed and just needed to you use the search function.

We became good internet friends and when my wife and I were planning our honeymoon in 2014, we were going to spend 10 days in New York and I asked Kathie if she wouldn't mind getting us tickets to a Yankees game. I wasn't sure if she'd be comfortable about taking two people she'd never met in real life but she didn't hesitate in saying yes.

Not only did she get tickets but my wife and I got a tour of the NYPL including where Kathie worked in the rare books section, not open to the public. We then had lunch before a subway trip to the game. The Yankees played Pittsburgh that day and won 7-1. After the game we went to a little Greek restaurant down from Kathie's apartment. We finished the night at Kathie's apartment just chatting like we'd known each other in real life for years.

On the cab ride back to our accomodation that night, I just remember thinking how wonderful Kathie was to spend most of the day with us. So warm and welcoming. A couple of years ago my wife's boss was in New York and I emailed Kathie about giving him a tour of the NYPL. Again without hesitation she said yes.

I'll never forget that day in New York. Such wonderful memories.

Kathie was the heart and soul of this forum. It's a huge loss, like Matt mentioned it's up to all of us to keep the board alive. I know I need to practice what I preach. I don't spend as much time posting like I have in the past. I'm not saying everyone needs to posts daily, that's just not practical. Life gets in the way but I'm sure if we all stick around and discuss Clint's new upcoming film and other topics that interest us all, the board will survive.
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« Reply #23 on: April 22, 2021, 08:35:51 AM »

I am so sorry to hear this.
Even if I started to come here three years ago or so, I noticed and respected her tremendous and honorable knowledge in Clint Eastwood films that she generously shared.
KC always had the specific answers that we were looking for. She will be missed.

My heartfelt condolences.

Rest in peace, Kathie.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2021, 08:42:50 AM by Hocine » Logged
Matt
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« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2021, 07:09:55 AM »

Kathie's obituary in the New York Times has been posted online.  The article mentions that it will be in today's print edition (Saturday, April 24).

I'm going to post the entire article, which we usually don't do here, but these are extenuating circumstances, and the New York Times will sometimes require a subscription to read articles (especially if you've already read a few articles on their site without subscribing):

Quote
Kathie Coblentz, 73, Dies; Not Your Ordinary Librarian

A Yankees fan, marathon runner, cinephile, editor, and, yes, a cataloger, she was the New York Public Library's third-longest serving employee.

Kathie Coblentz, a Renaissance woman who read or spoke 13 languages; collaborated on books about the directors Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood and Alfred Hitchcock; and, during her day job, cataloged rare books for more than 50 years at The New York Public Library, died on April 3 at a hospital in Manhattan. She was 73.

She was apparently grazed by a car pulling out of an underground garage as she was walking home to her apartment on West 58th Street, fell and hit her head and never regained consciousness, her friend and former colleague Jane Greenlaw said.

In that home, of 900 square feet, were some 3,600 books of her own, all having served as inspiration in her writing The New York Public Library Guide to Organizing a Home Library (2003).

Ms. Coblentz was recruited for a library job in 1969 even before she graduated from the University of Michigan, said Anthony W. Marx, the library's president and CEO. "She thought she'd work at The New York Public Library until she figured out what to do next," he said. "Well, she never left."

She was the library's third-longest serving employee, working most recently in the 42nd Street research library's special formats processing department of the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs.

Her supervisor, Deirdre Donohue, described her as the "matriarch of our work family," who cataloged hundreds of items "that were the products of detective work, deep research and skepticism about facts."

Ms. Coblentz was a bibliophile with interests that ranged well beyond the written word. Her blog on the library's website was full of eclectic arcana. She demystified a Wikipedia debate over whether the Syrian author of "Scala Paradisi" wrote in the sixth or seventh century. And she rhapsodized about photographs of the last "blue blood moon" seen over North America in 1866.

As a rare materials cataloger for the Spencer Collection -- it "surveys the illustrated word and book bindings of all periods and all countries and cultures," the library says -- she conducted public tours of the steel stacks beneath what is now known as the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42nd Street, reminding visitors that browsing among those books was prohibited and that researchers had to order hard copies of materials from the card catalog, which was later digitized.

"That's why catalogers are the most important workers in this library," she would tell her tour group.

Ms. Coblentz was a true-blue Yankees fan (she and a friend were planning to go to a game being played two days after her death), and a committed cinephile.

She collaborated with her former teacher from the 1990s at the New School, Robert E. Kapsis, a professor emeritus of Sociology and Film Studies at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, on researching (including translating avant-garde European criticism into English), editing and indexing books.

She edited anthologies of interviews with contemporary filmmakers and was a contributing editor, writer and programmer for Professor Kapsis's interactive Multimedia Hitchcock project in 1999 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles.

And she ran in several New York City Marathons.

Kathie Lynn Coblentz was born on Nov. 4, 1947. Her father was Dr. Jacob Coblentz, an immigrant born in Riga, Latvia, who was a bacteriologist in Lansing, Mich., where she appears to have been born. He also worked in Tennessee and Ohio before settling in Frankfort, Mich., where he was employed by the Pet Evaporated Milk Company and the Michigan Department of Health; he died when she was 10. Her mother was Sidney Ellarea Coblentz, an art teacher and artist.

Even in high school in Frankfort, in northwest Michigan, Ms. Coblentz demonstrated a bent for cataloging, winning a mathematics award for a paper titled "Some Possible Systems of Numerical Notation."

She earned a degree in German from Michigan State University in 1968 and a master's of library science from the University of Michigan in 1969. She learned Danish, Norwegian and Swedish so that she could read her favorite Scandinavian authors of murder mysteries unaltered by translation.

She had no immediate survivors. Her older brother, Peter, died in 1969.

For a lifelong cataloger who wrote a high school paper on improving ways to sort things numerically, her system of classifying her own collection of books at home defied library science and was ripe for parody. Ms. Coblentz had 16 bookcases holding more than 200 feet of shelf space in her one-bedroom apartment. The books were arranged by country of origin, size, sentimentality and personal obsession.

"Your system doesn't have to be logical," she told The New York Times in 2005. "It just has to work for you."

Sam Roberts, an obituaries reporter, was previously The Times's urban affairs correspondent and is the host of "The New York Times Close Up," a weekly news and interview program on CUNY-TV. @samrob12




https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/23/obituaries/kathie-coblentz-dead.html

Thank you, Laura, for sending the link for me to share here.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2021, 07:20:07 AM by Matt » Logged
The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2021, 03:33:01 PM »

Thanks for posting that Matt.

Such an extraordinary woman.
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« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2021, 09:43:42 PM »

Thank you Matt..
What an amazing lady. I feel privileged to have known her.
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Christopher
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« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2021, 12:19:05 PM »

I'd wondered if she had any siblings or any other family around. Sad to see that she lost a brother so many years ago.
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Matt
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« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2021, 03:30:13 PM »

Thank you Matt..
What an amazing lady. I feel privileged to have known her.

She was! And I feel the same.

This is just so sad. She had a friend who always took her to the first home series of the Yankees  season, and one of the things that broke my heart was seeing that she was getting to go to that big game within 2 days of this accident, especially since with COVID there hadn't been home games for such a long time. She got vaccinated in preparation for it. She must have been so excited to go. It just breaks my heart. I miss her. I have this awful habit of missing people more when they are gone, and taking for granted when they are with us. I keep trying to bear this in mind with my friends and family. Having lost 4 of my very best friends in the past 6 months, it is just so difficult.  But, of all my friends, she was the most magnificent. She was the one who I truly felt privileged to say was my friend.
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Jed Cooper
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« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2021, 08:34:01 AM »

I just came across this thread and offer my sincerest, most heartfelt condolences.  I truly hope KC is with loved ones, family and friends that God chose to call Home before her.

I say this with as much meaning and feeling now as ever before:

God Bless you, KC. 🙏🏻  May you Rest In Peace. 🙏🏻

« Last Edit: May 12, 2021, 08:52:53 AM by Jed Cooper » Logged

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« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2021, 08:21:15 AM »

  I see in that NY Daily News article KC is referred to as the "matriarch of our work family" by a colleague at the NY Library.  She was the matriarch of the board in my mind.  I eventually upped my grammar game after seeing her meticulously well-written posts.  Throughout the years I always enjoyed talking to KC and reading her thoughts on Eastwood movies  - and anything else really.  I figured one day on a trip to New York I'd happen to be near the library and I'd stop in and say hello.  I'm really sad that I'll never get that chance.  She was an awesome person in so many ways, and had a seemingly tireless energy and a rare "renaissance woman" varied skillset.  Even in the somewhat limited capacity (via the board) in which I knew her, I'm still lucky to have known her.

  RIP KC

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Brendan
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« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2021, 12:37:29 PM »

I don't even know what to say.

I have no words.

This was absolutely heart breaking to hear this news.

Kathie was great. Hands down. Great. She had helped me several times with school work in terms of anything from proofreading my work, editing it and offering suggestions. The knowledge she possessed was astounding. There were words that'd she use on the board and in PMs that I'd have to look up! We may have had some differences at times but she was always level headed in our talks and would respond to each point and by the end of it we were good. She was awesome like that.

I was in NYC many years ago and I hate that I never had time to meet up. Every now and then I'd think that if I ever went back to the city I'd make sure I'd visit her. It saddens me that this will not happen.

I don't even know what I'm saying so I apologize if this seems like I'm rambling.

KC was quite the person. The board won't be the same. 
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« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2021, 09:49:09 PM »

I am very shocked to read this. I watched the Yankees no hit my Texas Rangers earlier tonight. After the game was over I instantly thought about KC cause I know she's a die hard Yankees fan. I was going to message her about the game but came across this sad post. I haven't been able to get on the site as much as I use to in the past so I'm just now learning of her passing. She was always very nice and kind to me answering any questions I had. Her and SK were first members that I spoke with when first joining the site. I never got to meet KC in person. But just talking with her online you could tell she was a genuine caring person. The site won't be the same without her. R.I.P KC.
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