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Author Topic: the gun clint used in the gbu  (Read 1718 times)
angeleyesTHE2nd
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« on: July 20, 2004, 05:05:32 AM »

That pistol he used in the GBU was i believe a revolover that took black powder. The earlier versions were made like that and believe or not i own a pistol that looks almost identical to the one Clinte used in the movie.
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KC
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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2004, 05:52:12 AM »

angeleyesTHE2nd, because of the period (Civil War), all the guns were made to look like "black powder" revolvers, though in fact, Eastwood's character is seen loading his with metal cartridges.

Don't point that thing at a policeman. And please don't spell Clint's name with an "e" at the end. ;)
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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2004, 05:58:23 AM »

Here is DAmbrosia's post about this gun. It's from the "Clint's Guns" at the top of this Forum.

The Good The Bad And The Ugly--1966

The Gun the that Blondy uses in The Good the Bad and the Ugly seems to be some sort of Super Modified Bad-Ass Gun; Pre-prototye Richards Conversion as seen below:

Blondie's modified 1851 Navy Colt with silver rattlesnake grips (See Above)




The earlier convertions still left the loading lever in place and did not have ejector rod prevalent to the Colt ‘73’s  The conversions started to add ejector rods around the same time colt came out with the Peacemaker, however many revolvers still had the intact  loading lever as well as none at all…

Although there were metallic cartridges during the Civil War (Smith and Wesson, .44 Henry Rimfire, .22 Short and .56-56 Spencer to name a few) Leone thought to put the barrel of an 1851 Colt Navy on the frame of an 1851 Navy that had been changed to the Richards-Mason cartridge conversion which didn't happen until 1871?  

1871 is when the breech loader patent held by Smith and Wesson ran out and companies could began to manufacture legally bore though cylinders.  

However who is to say that if you had enough money and knew the right gunsmith and had access to metallic cartridges, well,   Faster to reload and saves time - I suppose that was their reason. Even better, look at Lee Van Cleef's belt - you will see metallic cartridges in the loops, even though there are percussion caps on the cylinder of his revolver.
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