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Author Topic: Dead Pool Harpoon Scene  (Read 11344 times)
rr-electricangel
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« on: December 25, 2012, 10:57:01 AM »

There are lots of reasons to pick one Dirty Harry movie over another but one things stands out in my mind. How a movie ends seems to matter. If you ever watch an action movie, sequel or not, the ending is probably the most fulfilling or biggest letdown if not properly thought out. By the time The Dead Pool came out Harry was invincible. Not only could he escape a full blown machine-gun assault in an elevator without a scratch but he was able to take out his foe as though they were of no consequence. The harpoon scene in The Dead Pool was far too quick. It left me with the most unfulfilling ending of any Dirty Harry movie.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2012, 12:38:56 PM by rr-electricangel » Logged

Clint Eastwood's words of wisdom: "Take your profession seriously; don't take yourself seriously. Don't take yourself seriously in the process, because you really only matter to a certain degree in the whole circus out here."
KC
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« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2012, 11:04:06 AM »

I tend to agree with you there. By the time of The Dead Pool, the series had descended into self-parody
« Last Edit: December 25, 2012, 11:05:13 AM by KC » Logged
rr-electricangel
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« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2012, 12:41:44 PM »

KC, by self parody do you mean the endings of each Dirty Harry movie or the way each movie was handled in regards to Harry's character?
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Clint Eastwood's words of wisdom: "Take your profession seriously; don't take yourself seriously. Don't take yourself seriously in the process, because you really only matter to a certain degree in the whole circus out here."
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« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2012, 04:50:26 PM »

The first four movies were serious enough and not particularly ironic, though obviously the "set pieces" at the beginning of each were played for laughs. But in The Dead Pool, it's as though all the expected features of the Dirty Harry series were being "quoted," but in a diminished or slightly ridiculous way (like the car chase with the toy car). The ending is only the climax of that.
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rr-electricangel
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2012, 02:44:02 AM »

Hmm. That's a tough call KC. Audience expectation sometimes makes these type of situations happen I suppose. When I had my meeting with Hollywood Pitch they mentioned a lot about appealing to a younger audience. Radio controlled cars and harpoons were choices made based upon what a younger audience might like to see. I didn't have a problem with the harpoon gun. The scene was simply over too quickly but maybe that is just the way it was to me. The radio controlled car well...that's another story.  ;)
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Clint Eastwood's words of wisdom: "Take your profession seriously; don't take yourself seriously. Don't take yourself seriously in the process, because you really only matter to a certain degree in the whole circus out here."
Tang Lung
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2013, 10:23:40 AM »

TAS episode Beware the Gray Ghost stole the exploding toy car plot device  ;)

Death Wish sequels also became more and more OTT.......
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2013, 01:01:29 PM »

What's TAS?  ???
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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2013, 03:18:17 PM »

Apparently, as is well known to aficionados: "Batman: The Animated Series."  :D
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The Schofield Kid
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« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2013, 04:18:58 PM »

Thank you. :)
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Tang Lung
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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2013, 04:03:08 PM »

Yup , I meant BTAS.

STAS is Superman  :police:
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Richard Earl
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« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2013, 04:17:30 PM »

I went to see The Dead Pool in the theater when I was in High School. I loved it then. I watch it now and it does not hold a candle to the others. The one liners are enjoyable though. I agree with KC how the movie parodied the series.
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exit00
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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2013, 07:22:23 AM »

Yeah,  while I enjoyed The DeadPool, it certainly had a terribly written ending. Much too quick and without any tension.  Also, since the bad guy was not compelling,  the ending was just blah..... not one that you want to yell "YEAH"
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The Man With No Aim
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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2013, 11:52:27 PM »

The first four movies were serious enough and not particularly ironic, though obviously the "set pieces" at the beginning of each were played for laughs. But in The Dead Pool, it's as though all the expected features of the Dirty Harry series were being "quoted," but in a diminished or slightly ridiculous way (like the car chase with the toy car). The ending is only the climax of that.

What's a "set piece"?

And how was the opening episode in Dirty Harry played for laughs?

Hey, I gots to know.
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« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2013, 01:18:27 AM »

What's a "set piece"?
From merriam-webster.com:

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set piece  noun

1
a : a composition (as in literature, art, or music) executed in a fixed or ideal form often with studied artistry and brilliant effect
b : a scene, depiction, speech, or event that is obviously designed to have an imposing effect

I'm thinking of the episodes at or (I should have said) NEAR the beginning of each movie that have little or no connection to the rest of the story, but show off Harry's ... special abilities in a spectacular way. The bank robbery scene in Dirty Harry, the airplane hijacking scene in Magnum Force, the liquor store robbery in The Enforcer, etc.

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And how was the opening episode in Dirty Harry played for laughs?

Hey, I gots to know.

I meant the bank robbery scene, of course. And you gots to admit, it's pretty funny.
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The Man With No Aim
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« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2013, 01:51:46 AM »

Thanks for the definition of set piece.
 
What's the humour in the bank robbery? You mean the sadistic humour when Harry pulls the trigger and shows the punk that he was bluffed with an empty gun? I was born with a natural understanding of sadistic humour but I have always considered myself sadistic, not (intentionally) humorous. But is that what you mean?
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« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2013, 01:24:53 PM »

Well, yes, perhaps sadistic humor there, but the whole scene has a comic edge to it. From the interruption to Harry's humble lunch ...



(why couldn't the bank robbers have waited until the on-duty police arrived, or until he had finished his hot dog, at least!)

... to the imperturbable way he strides out into the street, holding the gun but still chewing the hot dog, and demands that the robbers "Halt!" ...



... to the chaotic shootout that ensues, climaxing with a car crashing into a flower stand and a fire hydrant, scattering blossoms and releasing a gusher skyward ...



... to the long shot with the small figure of Inspector Callahan, still striding calmly towards danger ...  and the theater marquee in the background that just happens to be advertising Clint Eastwood's debut film as a director ...



(Contrast Harry's calm with the abject terror of passersby ...)



... and then the whole "Feel lucky?" sequence, the dialogue delivered by Harry like a routine he's gone through many times before. No one is in danger here; the punk will never feel lucky, and Harry always knows exactly how many shots he's fired. The climax is his beatific grin after he's completed his little joke ...


Funny? Yes, I, for one, have always found this scene very funny and I guarantee you it gets laughs when the film is screened in a theater.
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exit00
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« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2013, 03:51:20 PM »

Well, yes, perhaps sadistic humor there, but the whole scene has a comic edge to it. From the interruption to Harry's humble lunch ...

... and then the whole "Feel lucky?" sequence, the dialogue delivered by Harry like a routine he's gone through many times before. No one is in danger here; the punk will never feel lucky, and Harry always knows exactly how many shots he's fired. The climax is his beatific grin after he's completed his little joke ...

Funny? Yes, I, for one, have always found this scene very funny and I guarantee you it gets laughs when the film is screened in a theater.

Yeah, I agree that this scene is funny, especially the hot dog eating part.  Although I always felt the whole "feel lucky" sequence in the beginning was to set up the ending "feel lucky" sequence.  And I certainly laugh at the entire "feel lucky" scene in the beginning... and I think this scene also shows us from the getgo that Harry is a different type of cop.
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KC
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« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2013, 11:32:35 PM »

Although I always felt the whole "feel lucky" sequence in the beginning was to set up the ending "feel lucky" sequence. 

According to Clint, it was the other way around ... or at least, the script originally had only  the "feel lucky" sequence in the bank robbery scene, and it was Clint's idea to repeat it in the end, with a difference, From an interview with David Thomson:

Quote
Q: These tags that become so important in some of your films, like “Make my day,” do you think up some of those?

A: That particular one came from the screenwriter, came from Joe Stinson. The only thing I did is I reprised it at the end—that’s my contribution. I saw the line as a goodie, so I said let’s throw it in right here. Much like we did with Dirty Harry and, Did he fire six shots or five … ? “To tell you the truth I’ve forgotten in all this excitement. But seeing this is a .44 Magnum …” And so I thought, let’s do it at the very end, let’s close with it. Because it’s obviously going to be something special. And I told Don [Siegel], I said I can play it looser, with humor, to begin with, so there’s a certain irony, but at the end I can play it with a whole different attitude. With a certain, absolutely peak velocity. But that was written in there originally by Harry Julian Fink, in the screenplay. When I read the screenplay it jumped right out and I thought, “Oh, yeah, this’ll be quite unusual.” You can feel them. “Smith & Wesson and me,” I made up. “Who’s this ‘we’? It’s Smith & Wesson and me.”

(From Film Comment, v. 20, no. 5 (September/October 1984); reprinted in Clint Eastwood: Interviews, 1999 and 2012 editions)

And I certainly laugh at the entire "feel lucky" scene in the beginning... and I think this scene also shows us from the getgo that Harry is a different type of cop.

That he is, exit00 ... That he is!  ;)
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