News: Now showing in theaters: CRY MACHO, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood!


0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this board.
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: What it is like working with Clint  (Read 7362 times)
Wilbur Eddings
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


View Profile Email
« on: April 09, 2013, 02:16:18 PM »

Don't get too excited, I have never worked with Mr Eastwood (would love to though) but I found this interesting article tonight and thought I would share it with y'all.

http://www.flickeringmyth.com/2011/12/working-with-clint-michael-owens-talks.html

Anyone else have juicy tidbits like this?

As an aspiring filmmaker I am really interested in cool stuff like this!
Logged
Wilbur Eddings
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


View Profile Email
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2013, 02:25:55 PM »

Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2013, 04:58:10 PM »

Nice idea for a thread! There are many such articles, some might already be posted here, but it would be nice to see them gathered in a single thread.
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2013, 08:49:32 PM »

Joel Cox on working with Eastwood:

http://www.iftn.ie/news/?act1=record&only=1&aid=73&rid=4285038&tpl=archnews&force=1

This was posted by Dan Dassow last year, but it definitely belongs here too.
Logged
Rawhide7
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1289



View Profile Email
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2013, 02:35:38 PM »

Palooka should comment on this as he's worked with Clint before.
Logged
Wilbur Eddings
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


View Profile Email
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2013, 12:41:10 PM »

Joel Cox on working with Eastwood:

http://www.iftn.ie/news/?act1=record&only=1&aid=73&rid=4285038&tpl=archnews&force=1

This was posted by Dan Dassow last year, but it definitely belongs here too.

Fantastic!

Thank you.
Logged
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2013, 01:47:01 PM »

Logged
JSE
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 145


Don't just do something, stand there...


View Profile Email
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2013, 04:00:24 AM »

Here's a fantastic 46 minute video of Stephen Campanelli and Michael Goldman (the author) at a book signing for "Clint Eastwood: Master Filmmaker At Work".

Stephen, who has been Clint's camera operator for the better part of 2 decades, discusses at length what it's like to work with Clint.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCVT6Zi-HvU
Logged
palooka
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 573



View Profile Email
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2013, 12:23:07 AM »

Here's a fantastic 46 minute video of Stephen Campanelli and Michael Goldman (the author) at a book signing for "Clint Eastwood: Master Filmmaker At Work".

Stephen, who has been Clint's camera operator for the better part of 2 decades, discusses at length what it's like to work with Clint.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCVT6Zi-HvU

Wonderful interview!
Logged

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
palooka
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 573



View Profile Email
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2013, 12:23:46 AM »

Palooka should comment on this as he's worked with Clint before.



I'd love to write with my experiences on Clint's sets, but I feel I might bore everyone rigid. I'm unlikely to ever stop talking.
Logged

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
KC
Administrator
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 32408


Control ...


View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2013, 08:03:40 AM »

Not at all, palooka! Please share any experiences you care to, we'd love to hear them.
Logged
AKA23
Classic Member
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3598



View Profile Email
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2013, 09:32:43 AM »



I'd love to write with my experiences on Clint's sets, but I feel I might bore everyone rigid. I'm unlikely to ever stop talking.

Yeah, I second this. I am all for hearing as much as possible about your experiences working with Eastwood. You always have interesting and valuable things to share, so post away, my friend.  O0
Logged
TWOMULES
Guest


Email
« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2013, 02:24:44 PM »



I'd love to write with my experiences on Clint's sets, but I feel I might bore everyone rigid. I'm unlikely to ever stop talking.

Please do, I would love to hear all about it palooka. :)
Logged
Lin Sunderland
Guest


Email
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2013, 08:06:19 AM »

Yes I would love to hear about it too palooka.  :)
Logged
JSE
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 145


Don't just do something, stand there...


View Profile Email
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2013, 09:10:49 AM »

Me too Palooka  :)

Looks like there's a groundswell of interest starting here... O0
Logged
Rawhide7
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1289



View Profile Email
« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2013, 01:38:22 PM »

Yes please share Palooka! :)
Logged
-satu-
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1719



View Profile Email
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2013, 11:05:36 AM »

I'd love to hear about it as well  O0
Logged

Could anyone else have seen the beauty of it?
palooka
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 573



View Profile Email
« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2013, 01:20:03 PM »

Outvoted. I'm on it.
Logged

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
TWOMULES
Guest


Email
« Reply #18 on: April 30, 2013, 10:56:02 PM »

Outvoted. I'm on it.

Good man, palooka. O0 Looking forward to hearing all about your experiences working with Mr. Eastwood. :)
Logged
palooka
Member Extraordinaire
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 573



View Profile Email
« Reply #19 on: May 01, 2013, 07:50:45 AM »

It is best to start by making it very clear that I’m a huge fan of Mr Eastwood’s. That would of course be a hideous understatement, but I need to show my obvious bias before stating what it is like to be at work on one of Clint’s sets. Any opinion I have is warped by the awe that I hold for Clint Eastwood as a director, an actor and an icon.

I’d made it a mission in my life to meet my hero face to face and shake his hand. A mission it seemed might be doomed to failure. As many of this boards long term residents know, I finally got that opportunity through a charitable donation to be on the set of INVICTUS.

I doubt I’ll be able to add anything new or insightful to this thread. Everything you already know of Clint’s workplace is true. It is a friendly place, a happy place, a productive place.

I have been lucky enough to spend a total of six days on location with Clint Eastwood , spread over 4 movies, on 3 continents. In all that time I heard no moaning, no complaining, no yelling and no criticism. Everyone on Clint’s sets seem to have his same friendly outlook on life. All have a job to do and it’s quite evident they are more than capable of doing it.  He hires the best and then sticks with them. He is loyal and the loyalty is returned. His team move quietly and quickly to set up and complete every shot, well aware of what is expected of them and well thanked after they do it.

The hardest thing for me, a complete novice at “acting” was understanding when the camera was actually rolling. We all know that a twirl of Clint’s wrist generally get things underway but if you can’t see him clearly then it’s really hard to know. All the assistant directors mimic the hand movement in an attempt to spread the word across the set but it is surprising, even when on full alert, how easily it passes you by unnoticed. While waiting to film my scene at a courthouse in Virginia in J. EDGAR, our initial instructions were to chat amongst ourselves as we awaited “the verdict”. We were also warned that a few minutes into the shot a second camera would mingle into the crowd from behind and we were to be diligent in moving to the side to let the camera through. This movement would be signalled by receiving a tap on the shoulder from the assistant director. I was fully engrossed in conversation with fellow extras when the camera operator and the tap on the shoulder came to me. I was so surprised we were already filming it took a horrible amount of time for it to register and for me to respond accordingly. I’m still adamant my confusion there led to that particular shot failing to make the final cut!

Most of the shots I was involved with or witnessed were executed with one efficient take. It is another well-known trait of Clint’s method. However, one scene in HEREAFTER required a few takes, this was entirely down to the “blocking” or actor positioning for that shot. It was fascinating to watch Matt Damon, Clint Eastwood and camera operator, Stephen Campanelli, work out how best to solve it. The room in which we were filming was rather small, the scene required Matt Damon to get to the far side of that room even though he entered it last. He only had a few seconds to complete that task and had to get past all of the extras, ideally without pushing us all over. The discussion amongst the three effortlessly worked out who was to stand where and at what time. The path of the cameraman and sound man were also mapped out and tape markers were added to the floor for everyone to reference. A couple more takes were still required to finesse the whole operation but the desired outcome was guaranteed.

Clint is a very friendly and polite man and although clearly intent on getting things right on set still has time for kind and inspiring words to us lowly extras. Nothing could possibly invigorate an extra more than being told “nice work” and “great celebrations” (on the set of INVICTUS) by Clint Eastwood  as he moves past you to get ready for the next scene. I don’t really care if he meant it or not, the smile resulting from those quietly spoken words just appeared on my face again while writing this.  I defy anyone not to volunteer to walk through a wall for him after that. I believe that is how all his entire crew feel. It is the respect that the man commands. Similar words were spoken on all the movies I participated in, it is what he does, it is how he rolls.

My experiences culminated last spring in TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE when I actually got to do a couple of scenes with Clint. Something I never thought possible. Something I’ll never forget. At one point in proceedings it started to rain. Some of the co-stars and some of the extras sort shelter under an equipment tent. It wasn’t raining too hard and as far as this Englishman was concerned, it was still a glorious Spring day, so I decided to stay on the bleachers. Mr Eastwood was sitting directly in front of me and he too decided to stay put. A conversation stated among a few of us about the Masters golf about to take place that weekend in nearby Augusta. No pretence, no ego, just a few guys sitting in the Georgia springtime talking about golf. A production assistant came over with an umbrella and held it over Clint’s head but he did not ask for it and I think he would have happily got quite wet rather than bother anyone else. Kind of sums him up for me.

If my career in Clint Eastwood movies is over, I can tell you quite honestly that they rank among the greatest experiences of my life. 
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 07:51:56 AM by palooka » Logged

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
 




C L I N T E A S T W O O D . N E T